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Literary career of William Faulkne 



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THE LITERARY CAREER OF 
WILLIAM FAULKNER 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/literarycarOOmeri 



The Literary Career of 

William Faulkner 

A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL STUDY 
BY JAMES B. MERIWETHER 




PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

1961 




NOT T A KEN 

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Copyright, 1961, by Princeton University Library 

L.C. CARD NO. 61-14261 

♦ 

Design by P. J. Conkwright 

Printed in the United States of America 

by Princeton University Press at Princeton, New Jersey 

Collotypes by The Meriden Gravure Company 



In Memory 
of 

SAXE COMMINS 
HAROLD OBER 



CONTENTS 

Foreword vii 

I. The Exhibition 1 



Introduction 
Catalogue 


5 

7 


II. The Manuscripts 


55 


Introduction 
Handlist 


59 
63 


III. The English Editions 


95 


Introduction 
Bibliography 


99 
101 


IV. The Translations 


119 


Introduction 
Check List 


123 

127 


V. Motion Pictures and Television 


151 


Introduction 
Check List 


155 
156 


Appendix: 




Short Story Sending Schedule 


165 



Index 



FOREWORD 

This catalogue and the several bibliographical listings which here 
supplement it have been compiled to serve as a published record 
of the exhibition, "The Literary Career of William Faulkner," 
held in the Princeton University Library from May 10 through 
August 30, 1957. The exhibition was first planned during the 
early fall of 1956, at which time I was writing a dissertation on 
Faulkner for the Princeton English Department, and compiling 
a check list of Faulkner's writings for publication in the Princeton 
University Library Chronicle. Through the cooperation of Wil- 
liam S. Dix, University Librarian, and Saxe Commins, Faulkner's 
editor and long a devoted friend of the Library, arrangements 
were made which enabled me to begin gathering materials and 
information for an exhibition. 

After the opening of the exhibition the following spring, the 
check list of Faulkner's published writings appeared in an issue 
of the Chronicle (Vol. XVIII, No. 3) devoted to Faulkner. At 
the same time, in the belief that the annotations for the exhibition 
would prove useful to have available in more permanent form, 
it was planned to publish them, along with accompanying bib- 
liographical material that would further illustrate the scope of 
the exhibition and supplement the basic information in the 
Faulkner check list, which in the meantime had been made 
available separately, under the imprint of the Princeton Uni- 
versity Library. 

The five parts of this book, then, are designed to bring up 
to date and make available the information contained in, or 
collected for, that exhibition, and are to be considered in con- 
nection with the previously published check list as a basic bib- 
liographical reference for the study of Faulkner's literary career. 
Mr. Faulkner's kindness in depositing his own collection of his 
manuscripts in the Princeton University Library made it possible, 
both in the text of the annotations and in the handlist of the 
manuscripts, to make available for the first time much significant 
material about this aspect of his work. The listing of English edi- 
tions and translations has its basis in the emphasis placed 
in the exhibition upon Faulkner's reputation abroad. Their 
compilation delayed the publication of this book but it has 
thereby gained, I trust, in inclusiveness. Motion picture and 

vii 



television productions of Faulkner's writings, and his own work 
for those media, form another category which has benefited 
from the delay by expansion of the information made available 
in the exhibition itself. Finally, the presentation in tabular form 
in an appendix of the information in one of the Faulkner manu- 
scripts, a sending schedule which he at one time kept for his 
short stories, provides valuable information about a neglected 
aspect of Faulkner's career at one of its most interesting periods. 

In accordance with the Library's policy of bringing out in 
the Chronicle, if practicable, the annotations for its major 
exhibitions, Part I of this book was published in the Spring, 
1960 issue (Vol. XXI, No. 3). Also included were the first twenty- 
one of the illustrations used here. In preparing the annotations 
for republication in book form, a few changes and additions 
were made, but their format remains, as it was, largely determined 
by the needs and policies of publication in the Chronicle. 

Individual aid rendered in the preparation of all but Part I 
of this book has been acknowledged in the introduction to each. 
But thanks are due here for assistance given in preparing the 
exhibition itself, and in making possible this published record 
of it. Because publication was several times delayed, it is with 
apologies for their tardiness that the following acknowledgments 
are made to the individuals and institutions whose cooperation 
made possible the original exhibition, and the publication of 
this material from and related to it: 

First, very grateful acknowledgment is made to William Faulk- 
ner, who consented to the transfer to Princeton of his own col- 
lection of his manuscripts, which had been stored for several years 
at Random House, his publishers. None of this material had been 
previously shown or made available for study, and any distinction 
which the exhibition may have had was due to his kindness. 

To acknowledge the debt of this exhibition to Saxe Commins is 
to recall with sadness the loss suffered at his death in July, 1958, 
by his friends, by the Library, and by Princeton University. As 
Faulkner's editor, he arranged for the transfer of the Faulk- 
ner manuscripts to Princeton, he made available his own files 
and collection of Faulkner material for the exhibition, and he gave 
the necessary permissions for the publication of Faulkner manu- 
script material in the Faulkner issue of the Chronicle and in this 
catalogue. 

It is also saddening to recall here the death of Harold Ober, in 
October, 1959. Likewise a friend for many years of the Library, 



vui 



and Faulkner's literary agent, Mr. Ober was responsible not only 
for assistance in making arrangements for the exhibition, but 
also for permission to reproduce or quote from unpublished Faulk- 
ner writings. 

In all the processes of assembling and organizing the materials 
for the exhibition, and subsequently in preparing this catalogue, 
I have been grateful for the invaluable assistance of Alexander 
D. Wainwright, of the Library's Department of Rare Books and 
Special Collections, and Editor of the Chronicle. I am also grate- 
ful to him for help in the preparation of the annotations in 
Section XXX of the catalogue. For his help with the annotations 
of Sections II and XII I am indebted to George P. Garrett, Jr., 
though final responsibility for the form and accuracy of all the 
annotations is mine. To Mr. Garrett, too, I am greatly indebted 
for his assistance with the task of identifying, sorting, and arrang- 
ing the two packing boxes of Faulkner manuscripts when they 
arrived at the Princeton Library. 

Of the individual collectors who lent materials to the exhibition, 
the greatest debt is to Linton R. Massey, of Keswick, Virginia. 
Only the most significant of the many items which he made avail- 
able from his notable Faulkner collection are individually ac- 
knowledged in this catalogue, but special thanks are given him 
here for his willingness to supply, on the shortest notice, whatever 
the exhibition needed to fill a gap in a showcase or to illustrate a 
manuscript page by a printed one. 

Other lenders to whom thanks are due are C. Waller Barrett, 
Hodding Carter, Maurice E. Coindreau, Carvel Collins, George 
P. Garrett, Jr., Miss Mary Killgore, Leon Picon, Edward Shenton, 
James Silver, Phil Stone, and Ben Wasson. Items were also kindly 
lent by the New York Public Library, the Mary Buie Museum of 
Oxford, Mississippi, Random House, the Newberry Library, CBS 
Television, Lever Brothers Company, and Paramount Pictures 
Corporation. John Sykes Hartin, Director of Libraries of the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, was kind enough to make available photo- 
stats of Faulkner material from local newspapers. 

In June, 1959, the Faulkner manuscripts were transferred to 
the Alderman Library of the University of Virginia, where they 
are now on deposit. For making them available to me there in 
order to complete work on the catalogue, I am indebted to Faulk- 
ner's daughter, Mrs. Paul D. Summers, Jr., and I am grateful to 
Miss Anne Freudenberg, Assistant in Manuscripts at the Alder- 
man Library, for frequent and generous assistance. 

ix 



The drawing of the Oxford courthouse and Confederate monu- 
ment on the title-page is reproduced from the cover of the original 
exhibition leaflet, for which it was made by Gillett G. Griffin. 
Also taken from the leaflet is the Introduction to the exhibition 
annotations. 

The list of items shown, freed from the case-by-case limitations 
of the exhibition itself, has been partially rearranged, and the 
annotations have been expanded, where necessary, by descrip- 
tions of or quotations from the items they originally accompa- 
nied. Where the original note is now out of date or misleading, 
a footnote has been used to correct it, though no change has been 
made in the present tense originally used in the leaflet and an- 
notations. Throughout, the catalogue follows the final arrange- 
ment of the exhibition, though during its progress several addi- 
tions and changes were made, both in the items shown and the 
accompanying annotations. 

With the entry for each item in the catalogue is given the name 
of the lender, or, in the case of material owned by the Princeton 
University Library, the call number or name of the collection in 
which the item may be found. Many of the periodicals actually 
exhibited were single copies borrowed for the purpose, but, in 
order to make the catalogue as useful a reference as possible, these 
are listed with the call numbers (the majority of which represent 
bound files) of the copies in the Princeton University Library. In 
most cases where more than one copy of an item was exhibited 
only the designation of the Library's copy is given. 

The John E. Annan Memorial Fund generously subsidized 
the costs of this book, and for their efforts in behalf of its pub- 
lication I am particularly indebted to William S. Dix and to 
two members of the Princeton English Department, Willard 
Thorp and Lawrance Thompson, who have befriended the project 
at every stage. 

James B. Meriwether 
University of North Carolina 



PART ONE 
THE EXHIBITION 



CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION 

PAGE 

Introduction 5 

1. Faulkner at the University of Mississippi 7 

2. The Marble Faun, 1924 9 

3. Faulkner in New Orleans 10 

4. Faulkner's County 13 

5. Sartoris, 1929 14 

6. The Sound and the Fury, 1929 16 

7. As I Lay Dying, 1930 17 

8. Sanctuary, 1931 18 

9. These 13, 1931 20 

10. Idyll in the Desert and Miss Zilphia Gant 21 

11. Light in August, 1932 22 

12. A Green Bough, 1933 23 

13. Doctor Martina and other stories, 1934 24 

14. Pylon, 1935 25 

15. Absalom, Absalom! 1936 26 

16. The Unvanquished, 1938 27 

17. The Wild Palms, 1939 28 

18. 77*e Hamlet, 1940 29 

19. Go Down, Moses, 1942 30 

20. Intruder in the Dust, 1948 32 

21. Knight's Gambit, 1949 33 

22. Collected Stories, 1950 34 

23. Requiem for a Nun, 1951 36 

24. ^4 Fable, 1954 38 

25. flz'g Woods, 1955 39 

26. The Snopeses of Yoknapatawpha, 1929-1957 40 

27. The Town, 1957 44 

28. Anthologies 45 

29. Movies and Television 47 

30. Awards and Public Career 49 

31. Photographs of William Faulkner 54 



INTRODUCTION 

A span of nearly forty years, from the appearance of the poem 
"L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune" in The Neiv Republic on August 6, 
1919, to the publication of the novel The Tozvn by Random 
House on May 1, 1957, is covered by this exhibition tracing the 
literary career of William Faulkner. Included among the works 
displayed are all of his twenty-five books, from two presentation 
copies of The Marble Faun, a volume of poems published in 1924, 
to the limited, signed issue of The Town, as well as many of his 
short stories, poems, articles, and other publications. Thanks to 
the deposit in the Library of Mr. Faulkner's own collection of his 
manuscripts, and through the co-operation of his editor, Saxe Com- 
mins, and of his publishers, Random House, it is possible to 
show manuscript material for all of his books, and for much of 
the other published work included in the exhibition. 

William Faulkner was born on September 25, 1897, in New 
Albany, Mississippi, but has lived most of his life in the nearby 
college town of Oxford, where his family moved when he was a 
boy, and where his father was later to hold several administrative 
posts at the university. There his literary career began, upon his 
return to college after service in World War I, with the appear- 
ance of "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune" and the pieces, mostly poems, 
which he contributed to the college weekly, The Mississippian. 
Shortly after the publication of The Marble Faun, his first book, 
he left Oxford for New Orleans. There, during the first half of 
1925, he wrote fiction for the Sunday magazine section of the 
Times-Picayune, became a friend of Sherwood Anderson, and 
wrote his first novel, Soldiers' Pay, which was published the fol- 
lowing year by Liveright, Anderson's publisher. A trip abroad was 
followed, in 1927, by a second novel, Mosquitoes. 

The publication of his third novel, Sartoris, in 1929, marked a 
turning point in Faulkner's career. It was the first volume in what 
has become the Yoknapatawpha series. "With Soldiers' Pay I 
found out writing was fun," he has said in an interview. "But I 
found out after that not only each book had to have a design but 
the whole output or sum of an artist's work had to have a design." 
Sartoris marked not only the inception of the design that was 
eventually, after years of neglect, to bring Faulkner in 1950 the 
Nobel Prize for literature, but it was the first of his works whose 



setting was the author's own north Mississippi countryside, a land 
of small farms and rolling hills: "Beginning with Sartoris," he 
said, "I discovered that my own little postage stamp of native soil 
was worth writing about and that I would never live long enough 
to exhaust it." 

The more than a dozen books and three dozen short stories of 
the Yoknapatawpha series which have followed Sartoris have in- 
deed shown no signs of exhausting the materials of Faulkner's 
county. No two Faulkner novels, within or outside the Yoknapa- 
tawpha series, are alike, and such works as The Sound and the 
Fury (1929), As I Lay Dying (1930), Light in August (1932), Ab- 
salom, Absalom! (1936), The Hamlet (1940), Go Down, Moses 
(1942), and The Town (1957), show, in their rich variety, the con- 
stant, restless urge of their author to experiment with new forms 
and methods. Neither critical nor (in the case of Sanctuary) popu- 
lar acclaim has ever led him to repeat an experiment or imitate a 
success, and this refusal to remain within a literary pigeonhole, to 
be classified, has made the proper recognition of his achievement 
far more difficult. 

In Faulkner a literary pioneer's interest in technical inno- 
vation has been combined with a craftsman's care to perfect his 
work. A glance at the manuscripts in the exhibition shows how 
painstaking has been the process of revising and rewriting, and dis- 
played are many works which not only went through several 
manuscript versions but have undergone subsequent revision in 
their various published appearances. 

The history of the Snopes family of Yoknapatawpha, which is a 
minor theme in several of Faulkner's novels and the main subject 
of a number of short stories, of The Hamlet, and of The Town, 
is given special emphasis in the exhibition. By the inclusion of 
numerous translations, the exhibition also suggests the widespread 
influence and reputation of Faulkner's writings throughout the 
world. 



1. FAULKNER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MISSISSIPPI 

In World War I William Faulkner served briefly in the Royal 
Air Force, although he was still a cadet, in training in Canada, at 
the end of the war. After his return to Mississippi, he enrolled as 
a special student in the fall term of 1919 at the University of Mis- 
sissippi, where his father, Murry C. Falkner, was Assistant Secre- 
tary. (William Faulkner apparently first added the "u" to his sur- 
name while in the RAF, and afterward retained it as his "literary" 
signature.) He soon became a well-known campus figure in his 
British uniform. 

During the academic year 1919-1920 thirteen of his poems ap- 
peared in The Mississippian, the weekly student newspaper, where 
they were attacked, defended, and parodied energetically. Draw- 
ings by Faulkner had appeared in Ole Miss, the yearbook of the 
University of Mississippi, before his departure for service in the 
RAF, and other drawings and poems appeared in the volumes for 
1919-1920 and 1920-1921. 

1. Photograph of Faulkner in RAF uniform. Glossy photostat, en- 
larged, from Ole Miss . . . 1919-1920 [University, Miss., 1920], 
p. 107. [Original lent by Carvel Collins] 




"L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune." 

Faulkner's literary career may be said to have begun with the 
publication of the poem "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune" in The 
New Republic on August 6, 1919. With the exception of a few 
drawings, this is his first known published work. His first con- 
tribution to The Mississippian was a reprinting, with minor 
alterations, of this poem a few months later. 



a. The New Republic, August 6, 1919, p. 24. [Lent by Linton R. Massey; Library 
copy, 090i.N562q] 

b. Photostat of "L'Apres-Midi D'un Faune" from The Mississippian, October 29, 
1919, p. 4. [Original in the University of Mississippi Library] 

3. "Cathay" and "Clair de Lune." 

Faulkner's first poem originally published in The Mississip- 
pian was "Cathay." "Clair de Lune" was one of several poems 
'From Paul Verlaine' which appeared during the spring se- 
mester. 

a. Photostat of "Cathay" from The Mississippian, November 12, 1919, p. 8. [Orig- 
inal in the University of Mississippi Library] 

b. Typescript of "Cathay." 1 p. It differs slightly from the published version. [Lent 
by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 3 

c. Photostat of "Clair de Lune" from The Mississippian, March 3, 1920, p. 6. 
[Original in the University of Mississippi Library] 

4. "Landing in Luck." Photostat from The Mississippian, No- 
vember 26, 1919, pp. 2, 7. [Original in the University of Mis- 
sissippi Library] 

The short story "Landing in Luck" won Faulkner a prize for the best story pub- 
lished in The Mississippian during the academic year 1919-1920. Apparently Faulk- 
ner's first piece of published fiction, it describes a near-crash by a cadet at what is 
obviously an RAF flight training field. 

5. Critical pieces in The Mississippian. 

Most of Faulkner's contributions to The Mississippian were 
poems, but he also published book reviews, essays, and dra- 
matic criticism. 

a. Photostat of essay on Conrad Aiken's Turns and Movies from The Mississippian, 
February 16, 1921, p. 5. [Original in the University of Mississippi Library] 

b. Photostat of article on Eugene O'Neill from The Mississippian, February 3, 
1922, p. 5. [Original in the University of Mississippi Library] 

6. "The Marionettes." 

The list of members of the student dramatic group in the 
1920-1921 Ole Miss is accompanied by a drawing that is almost 
certainly by Faulkner, who appears in the list as property-man. 
The drawing and the caption, with its characteristic reversed 
s's, are similar to those of the poem "Nocturne," in the same 
volume. 

The manuscript play, "The Marionettes," which has never 
been published, dates from this period in Faulkner's career and 
his association with the dramatic group. According to Faulk- 
ner's letter of authentication, he made six copies of the play. On 
the verso of the title-page of the copy exhibited Faulkner 
printed "FIRST EDITION 1920" and the flyleaf is signed by 
Ben Wasson, the president of the dramatic group, who later 
became Faulkner's literary agent. 

8 



a. Photostat of drawing and list of members of the Marionettes from The Ole 
Miss, 1920-1921 [University, Miss., 1921], p. 135. [Original lent by Carvel Collins] 

b. "The Marionettes: A Play in One Act," by W. Faulkner. 55-page manuscript, 
with nine pen-and-ink drawings by the author. [Lent by Miss Mary Killgore]. Opened 
to the first page of the text, a description of the setting of the opening scene, with 
its accompanying drawing of Pierrot at a garden table beneath the full moon. See 
Fig. 1 

c. Letter from Raymond Green to William Faulkner, February 9, 1932, requesting 
confirmation of his authorship of the play, with Faulkner's reply written at the 
bottom: "I wrote a play by that name once. It was never printed. I made and bound 
6 copies by hand. I signed none of them. There may also be a mss. It was long ago 
and I dont remember." [Lent by Miss Mary Killgore] 

7. "To a Co-ed." Ole Miss . . . 191 9-1 920 [University, Miss., 1920], 
p. 174. [Lent by Carvel Collins] 

The sonnet "To a Co-ed" was reprinted in an article on Faulkner by his college 
friend Louis Cochran in the Memphis Commercial Appeal Sunday magazine section, 
November 6, 1932, p. 4, and became the first of his writings in student publications 
to be more widely known after Faulkner became a novelist. 

The dawn herself could not more beauty wear 

Than you 'mid other women crowned in grace, 

Nor have the sages known a fairer face 

Than yours, gold-shadowed by your bright sweet hair 

Than you does Venus seem less heavenly fair; 

The twilit hidden stillness of your eyes, 

And throat, a singing bridge of still replies, 

A slender bridge, yet all dreams hover there. 

I could have turned unmoved from Helen's brow, 
Who found no beauty in their Beatrice; 
Their Thais seemed less lovely then as now, 
Though some had bartered Athens for her kiss. 
For down Time's arras, faint and fair and far, 
Your face still beckons like a lonely star. 

8. "Nocturne." The Ole Miss, 1920-1921 [University, Miss., 1921], 
pp. 214-215. [Lent by Carvel Collins]. See Fig. 2 

The unsigned poem "Nocturne" is almost certainly by Faulkner, and is character- 
istic of the poetry he was writing at the time of its appearance. The lettering and 
the accompanying drawing are similar to those of the manuscript play "The Marion- 
ettes." The text on p. 215 was obviously reversed with that on p. 214 in printing. 

9. Drawing. Ole Miss . . . 191J-1918 [University, Miss., 1918], 
p. 111. [Lent by Carvel Collins] 

Faulkner contributed drawings, both signed and unsigned, to the Ole Miss an- 
nuals of 1917, 1918, and 1922. 

2. THE MARBLE FAUN, 1924 

The Marble Faun, a pastoral cycle of nineteen poems, is William 
Faulkner's first book. It appeared in December, 1924, just before 
he left Oxford for New Orleans. Faulkner's friend Phil Stone, a 



lawyer in Oxford, wrote the introduction to the book, noting the 
talent of the author and his potential. It has never been reprinted. 

10. The Marble Faun. Boston, The Four Seas Company [1924]. 
Two copies. [Lent by Linton R. Massey; Ex 3734.92.361] 

The Massey copy contains on the front flyleaf two inscriptions: "To Miss Sallie 
McGuire from W Faulkner"; and "Autographed for Mr. Raymond Green. Oxford, 
Mississippi, April 15, 1932. Phil Stone". It is signed on the title-page: "William 
Faulkner Oxford, Miss. 24 December 1924". 

The Princeton copy also has two inscriptions on the front flyleaf: "To Polly Clark, 
from her friend, Bill Faulkner 19 December 1924"; and "With love to Cousin Polly. 
Phil Stone." It is signed on the title-page: "William Faulkner 19 December 1924". 

11. Typescript of The Marble Faun. [Lent by Ben Wasson]. See 
Fig. 26 

This 27-page carbon typescript is nearly a third shorter than the published book 
of poems. The manuscript corrections are not in Faulkner's hand. Shown is the 
beginning of the second group of poems, entitled "Summer." In the published 
version the titles of the seasons were omitted. 

12. Review by John McClure of The Marble Faun. Photostat 
from the New Orleans Times-Picayune Sunday magazine sec- 
tion, January 25, 1925, p. 6. [Original in the Louisiana State 
University Library] 

John McClure, who was book editor of the New Orleans Times-Picayune and one 
of the editors of The Double Dealer, was one of the first of the reviewers of William 
Faulkner to recognize his achievement and promise. His perceptive and favorable 
review of The Marble Faun appeared not long after Faulkner reached New Orleans, 
early in 1925. 

13. "Study." Photostat from The Mississippian, April 21, 1920, 
p. 4. [Original in the University of Mississippi Library] 

The poem "Study" is indicative of the pastoral mode which Faulkner developed 
for The Marble Faun. It was published in April, 1920, and Faulkner gave the date 
"April, May, June, igig" at the end of The Marble Faun, though it is likely that the 
poems of the book, if they were originally conceived at that date, were considerably 
changed in the five years that elapsed before their publication. 

14. "Portrait." The Double Dealer, III (June, 1922), 337. [0901 
.D727] 

Faulkner's first appearance in The Double Dealer, the little magazine published in 
New Orleans in the 1920's, was "Portrait," a poem characteristic of the verse (both 
published and unpublished) Faulkner was writing in the years preceding The 
Marble Faun. 

3. FAULKNER IN NEW ORLEANS 

Early in January, 1925, Faulkner left Oxford for New Orleans, 
where he spent nearly six months before leaving for Europe. In 
New Orleans he became a friend of Sherwood Anderson, contrib- 
uted poems and articles to The Double Dealer and fiction to the 
Times-Picayune, and wrote his first novel, Soldiers' Pay. 

10 




15. Sherwood Anderson & Other Famous Creoles, 1926. 

This book of drawings by the artist William Spratling was 
published in New Orleans in December, 1926, in a limited 
edition, a few of the copies bound in fancy boards and with 
some of the drawings tinted. 

As John McClure said in his review in the Times-Picayune 
(January 2, 1927), the drawings are "Amusing caricatures of 
familiar figures in the artistic and literary circles of New Or- 
leans, with not a line drawn in malice," and the book as a 
whole is "frankly a take-off" on Miguel Covarrubias' The 
Prince of Wales and Other Famous Americans. "William 
Faulkner," McClure noted, "has written the introduction and 
arranged the subtitles for the two-score sketches in the vol- 
ume. The introduction is a whimsical interpretation of Sher- 
wood Anderson's attitude to the Vieux Carre." Years later, 
in an article about Anderson, Faulkner himself described 
the introduction as a parody of Anderson's "primer-like style" 
which had led to a coolness between the two men (Atlantic, 
June, 1953). 

a. Sherwood Anderson ir Other Famous Creoles. New Orleans, Pelican Bookshop 
Press, 1926. One of about forty copies in fancy boards, signed by the artist. [Ex 
3734.92.3867, copy 2]. Opened to the title-page and tinted frontispiece (a view of the 
cathedral and Cabildo Alley roofs in the French Quarter). 

11 



b. Photostat, enlarged, of the final caricature of the volume. Drawn from the 
mirror, it shows Faulkner and Spratling at a table, writing and drawing. [From Ex 
3734.92.3867, copy 2]. See illustration on p. 11. 

16. Drawing of Faulkner by William Spratling. Photostat, slightly 
enlarged, from the New Orleans Times-Picayune Sunday 
magazine section, April 26, 1925, p. 6. [Original in the Louisi- 
ana State University Library] 

This drawing by Spratling of the twenty-seven-year-old author of The Marble 
Faun originally appeared in the Times-Picayune and was reproduced on the dust 
jacket of Mosquitoes two years later. 

17. Undated typewritten letter from Faulkner to Sherwood An- 
derson. 3 pp. [Lent by the Newberry Library]. See Figs. 27-29 

In his 1953 Atlantic article on Sherwood Anderson, Faulkner referred to the tall 
tales which he and Anderson concocted about the mythical Jackson family when the 
two men were in New Orleans together. The legends were recorded in an exchange 
of letters, of which this undated typescript account by Faulkner of the adventures of 
Al, Elenor, and Herman Jackson is part. Parts of the Jackson legend also appear in 
Mosquitoes (pp. 277-281). 

18. Soldiers' Pay. New York, Boni 8c Liveright, 1926. First edition, 
in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.384] 

Faulkner's first novel, Soldiers' Pay, was written during his stay in New Orleans. 
On Anderson's recommendation, it was accepted by Boni and Liveright, Anderson's 
publishers at that time. 

19. Bound typescript of Soldiers' Pay. 476 pp. [Lent by Mr. Faulk- 
ner]. See Fig. 5 

Opened to p. 151, showing manuscript addition to the text. 

20. Mosquitoes. New York, Boni and Liveright, 1927. First edi- 
tion, in dust jacket with drawing of mosquitoes. [Ex 3734.92 
•3655] 

Faulkner's second novel, Mosquitoes, was written after his return from the trip 
abroad, and has its setting in New Orleans. The verse read aloud by one of the 
characters on p. 252 (p. 336 of the bound typescript) appeared, revised, in Faulkner's 
1933 book of poems, A Green Bough. 

The first impression of the novel was issued in two different dust jackets. 

21. Mosquitoes. First edition, in dust jacket with drawing of 
bridge players. [Lent by Miss Mary Killgore] 

22. Bound typescript of Mosquitoes. 464 pp. [Lent by Mr. Faulk- 
ner]. See Fig. 6 

Opened to p. 336, showing manuscript corrections. 

23. Sketches in the Times-Picayune. 

Faulkner contributed sixteen short pieces of fiction in 1925 
to the New Orleans Times-Picayune, the first of which was 
"Mirrors of Chartres Street" and the last was "Yo Ho and 

12 



Two Bottles of Rum." Several of the characters in these 
sketches resemble those in "New Orleans," which appeared in 
The Double Dealer at about the same time. Although thirteen 
of these sketches have been known, in recent years, and have 
been reprinted in two different collections, three of the last 
four have been previously unrecorded. 

a. Photostat of "Mirrors of Chartres Street" from the Times-Picayune Sunday 
magazine section, February 8, 1925, pp. 1, 6. [Original in the Louisiana State Uni- 
versity Library] 

b. Photostat of "Out of Nazareth" from the Times-Picayune Sunday magazine 
section, April 12, 1925, p. 4. [Original in the Louisiana State University Library]. 
This was the only one of the series to be illustrated by William Spratling. 

c. The section subtitled 'The Cobbler' from "New Orleans," The Double Dealer, 
VII (January-February, 1925), 104. [0901. D727] 

d. Photostat of "The Cobbler" from the Times-Picayune Sunday magazine section, 
May 10, 1925, p. 7. [Original in the Louisiana State University Library] 

e. Photostat of "Yo Ho and Two Bottles of Rum" from the Times-Picayune Sun- 
day magazine section, September 27, 1925, pp. 1, 2. [Original in the Louisiana State 
University Library]. One of three previously unrecorded sketches; the others are "The 
Liar" (July 26) and "Country Mice" (September 20). All three appeared after Faulk- 
ner's departure for Europe, July 7, 1925, aboard the freighter "West Ivis." 

24. "Elmer." 130-page typescript, several versions, incomplete. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 7 

After finishing Soldiers' Pay and leaving New Orleans, Faulkner began a second 
novel, which he variously entitled "Elmer," "Portrait of Elmer Hodge," "Elmer and 
Myrtle," and "Growing Pains." Never completed, it contains some of the elements of 
humor and satire that he was to use in Mosquitoes. In one version, the central char- 
acter lived in Jefferson, Mississippi, as a small boy. 

4. FAULKNER'S COUNTY 

25. The maps of Yoknapatawpha County. 

From the publication of Sartoris in 1929 to The Town in 
1957, more than a dozen books and three dozen short stories 
by Faulkner have had their setting in his mythical north Mis- 
sissippi county of Yoknapatawpha. He has twice drawn maps 
of this county— "WILLIAM FAULKNER, Sole Owner & 
Proprietor" — once for Absalom, Absalom! in 1936, and ten 
years later for the Viking Portable Faulkner. (The 1936 map 
was redrawn but not brought up to date for the Modern 
Library issue of Absalom, Absalom! in 1951.) 

a. Map from the first edition of Absalom, Absalom! [Lent by James B. Meriwether] 

b. Photostat, enlarged, of map from the Modern Library issue of Absalom, 
Absalom! [Original: L 3734.92.311] 

c. Photostat, enlarged, of map from the Viking Portable Faulkner. [Original: 
3734.92.1946] 

26. Lafayette County. 

William Faulkner's home county of Lafayette (accented on 

13 



the second syllable: La-fay'-ette) is similar in many ways to 
Yoknapatawpha. The Tallahatchie River is on the northern 
boundary of both, and in the southern part of Lafayette 
County is the Yocona River, which on old maps appears in 
longer form and in various spellings, one of which is Yokna- 
patawpha, the same spelling that Faulkner gives to his imag- 
inary county and to the river that is its southern boundary. 

a. Photostat, enlarged, of Lafayette County and northern Mississippi from the 
United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of Public Roads, "Mississippi 
Transportation Map," 1949. Sheet 1 of 8 sheets. [Original in Maps Division] 

b. Photostat, enlarged, of detail from "Railroad Commissioners' Map of Missis- 
sippi," 1906 (copyright by Brandon Printing Co., Nashville), showing spelling "Yok- 
napatawpha." [Original in Maps Division] 

27. The courthouse and the Confederate monument. 

Descriptions in Faulkner's works of the courthouse in Jef- 
ferson, the county seat of Yoknapatawpha, correspond with 
the appearance of the actual courthouse in his home town of 
Oxford. However, the monument of the Confederate soldier 
in front of the Jefferson courthouse seems modeled after the 
monument on the University of Mississippi campus, rather 
than the one by the Oxford courthouse. 

a. Reproduction of picture of the courthouse and Confederate monument in Ox- 
ford, Mississippi, from David E. Scherman and Rosemarie Redlich, Literary America, 
New York, 1952, p. 148. [3570.815] 

b. Photograph of Confederate monument on the University of Mississippi campus. 
[Lent by Carvel Collins] 

c. Description of the courthouse and Confederate monument in Jefferson from 
Sartoris, p. 166: 

The courthouse was of brick too, with stone arches rising amid elms, and 
among the trees the monument of the Confederate soldier stood, his musket at 
order arms, shading his carven eyes with his stone hand. Beneath the porticoes 
of the courthouse and on benches about the green, the city fathers sat and talked 
and drowsed. . . . 

5. SARTORIS, 1929 

In New Orleans, Sherwood Anderson had advised Faulkner to 
write about his native north Mississippi. This Faulkner did for the 
first time in Sartoris, his third novel, although the small-town 
Georgia setting of Soldiers' Pay and the unidentified rural setting 
of one of the Times-Picayune sketches, "The Liar," seem to some 
extent to draw upon Oxford and Lafayette County. 

Faulkner dedicated Sartoris "TO SHERWOOD ANDERSON 
through whose kindness I was first published," and he recalled the 
importance of Anderson's advice and the significance of Sartoris 
in the "design" of his literary career in his 1953 Atlantic tribute to 
Anderson and in an interview in The Paris Review in 1956. 

14 



28. Sartoris. New York, Harcourt, Brace and Company [1929]. 
First edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734-92.383] 

29. Three pages from the manuscript of Sartoris: 01, 42-C, and 76. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 9 

This manuscript of an earlier version of Sartoris is entitled "Flags in the Dust." 
The Evelyn Sartoris who appears on p. 01 is the John Sartoris, twin brother of 
young Bayard, of the published book. The flyer whose marginal remark "I am 
Comyn of the Irish nation" occurs on p. 01 was omitted from the typescript and 
the published book, but appears, with his remark, in the short story "Ad Astra," 
published in 1931. 

30. Bound typescript of Sartoris (entitled "Flags in the Dust" in 
this version). 594 pp. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 8 

Opened to p. 221 for comparison with p. 76 of the manuscript. 

31. Sartoris. London, Chatto & Windus, 1932. First English edi- 
tion. [Lent by Random House] 

32. Sartoris. [Milan], Garzanti [1955]. Translation into Italian by 
Maria Stella Ferrari. [Ex 3734.92.383.6] 

33. Sartoris. Stockholm, Albert Bonniers Forlag [1955]. Transla- 
tion into Swedish by Th. Warburton. [Lent by Random 
House] 

34. Interview with Faulkner by Jean Stein, The Paris Review, IV 
(Spring, 1956), [28]-52. [0901. P237] 

35. William Faulkner. "Sherwood Anderson: An Appreciation." 
The Atlantic, CXCI (June, 1953), [27P29. [0901. A881] 

36. Colonel William C. Falkner. 

One of the characters of Sartoris, the Civil War officer and 
railroad builder John Sartoris, is modeled after Faulkner's 
great-grandfather, Colonel William C. Falkner (d. 1889). 
Lawyer, Confederate soldier, and railroad builder, Colonel 
Falkner was also author of several books. His novel The White 
Rose of Memphis, originally published in 1881, was reprinted 
thirty-six times in the next thirty years. His last book, which 
appeared in 1884, was Rapid Ramb lings in Europe. The de- 
scription in Sartoris of the effigy of Colonel Sartoris in the 
Jefferson cemetery recalls the monument over the grave of 
Colonel Falkner in Ripley, Mississippi. 

a. The White Rose of Memphis. With an introduction by Robert Cantwell. New 
York, Coley Taylor [1953]- This modern edition omits the epigraph and dedication 
of the original, as well as making numerous minor changes. [3733-754-397] 

b. Rapid Ramblings in Europe. Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1884. [Ex 
1401.338]. Opened to frontispiece, a picture of Colonel Falkner. 

15 



c. Description of the effigy of Colonel Sartoris in Jefferson, in Sartoris, p. 375: 

He stood on a stone pedestal, in his frock coat and bareheaded, one leg slightly 
advanced and one hand resting lightly on the stone pylon beside him. His head 
was lifted a little in that gesture of haughty pride which repeated itself gen- 
eration after generation with a fateful fidelity, his back to the world and his 
carven eyes gazing out across the valley where his railroad ran, and the blue 
changeless hills beyond, and beyond that, the ramparts of infinity itself. The 
pedestal and effigy were mottled with seasons of rain and sun and with drippings 
from the cedar branches, and the bold carving of the letters was bleared with 
mold, yet still decipherable. . . . 

d. Photograph of the monument of Colonel Falkner in Ripley, Mississippi. [Lent 
by James B. Meriwether] 

6. THE SOUND AND THE FURY, 1929 

The Sound and the Fury was published late in 1929 by the new 
firm of Jonathan Cape and Harrison Smith, after it had been re- 
jected by Harcourt, Brace and Company, the publishers of Sar- 
toris. Faulkner has often referred to it as his own favorite amonp- 
his works, and the one which cost him the greatest trouble in writ- 
ing. At the same time, he has emphasized the point that in one 
sense the writing was easy, for in this book he was striving to please 
no audience but himself. (It was written during the period in 
which his previous book, Sartoris, had been rejected by his old 
publisher, and had not yet been accepted by a new one.) 

In an unpublished note on The Sound and the Fury written 
during the early 1930's (lent to the Library by Mr. Faulkner), he 
describes it as "the only one of the seven novels which I wrote 
without any accompanying feeling of drive or effort, or any fol- 
lowing feeling of exhaustion or relief or distaste. When I began it 
I had no plan at all. I wasn't even writing a book. I was thinking 
of books, publication, only in the reverse, in saying to myself, I 
wont have to worry about publishers liking or not liking this at 
all." The writing of his first three novels had cost him progressively 
greater efforts, he continued, and when Sartoris was repeatedly 
turned down, "One day I seemed to shut a door between me and 
all publishers' addresses and book lists. I said to myself, Now I 
can write." The complexity, the control, and the emotional power 
which characterize this novel all seem to owe something to these 
circumstances of the writing. 

37. The Sound and the Fury. New York, Jonathan Cape and 
Harrison Smith [1929]. First edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 

3734-92-3 86 ] 

16 



38. Le Bruit et la Fureur. Paris, Gallimard [1938]. Translation 
into French by Maurice E. Coindreau. [Ex 3734.92.386.7] 

39. Schall und Wahn. Stuttgart, Scherz & Goverts Verlag [1956]. 
Translation into German by Helmut M. Braem and Elisa- 
beth Kaiser. [3734.92.386.6] 

40. L'Urlo e il Furore. [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori, 1956. Trans- 
lation into Italian by Augusto Dauphine. [Ex 3734.92.386.6] 

41. El Sonido y la Furia. Buenos Aires, Editorial Futuro [1947]. 
Translation into Spanish by Floreal Mazia. [Lent by Random 
House] 

42. Six pages from the manuscript of The Sound and the Fury: 
20, 34, 70, 87, 115, and 125. 1 [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See 
Figs. 10 and 11 

43. Bound typescript of The Sound and the Fury. 409 pp. [Lent 
by Mr. Faulkner] 

Opened to p. 86 for comparison with p. 34 of the manuscript. 

44. Undated autograph letter from Faulkner to Ben Wasson on 
The Sound and the Fury. 2 pp. [Lent by Linton R. Massey] 

In this letter Faulkner discusses the problem of indicating the time shifts in the 
stream-of-consciousness of the idiot Benjy, who is the narrator of the first section 
of The Sound and the Fury. Against his wishes, this section was first set up by the 
printer with breaks in the text to indicate the dislocations in time, but Faulkner, 
according to this letter, restored his original device of using italics for this purpose 
when he corrected the proofs. 

The idea of using inks of different colors to accomplish this, which Faulkner men- 
tions as a process which he wishes the publishing business were advanced enough 
to allow, was returned to a few years later when a new edition of the book was 
planned by Random House. Though announced for publication in 1933, the project 
was never completed, and Faulkner has stated in a recent interview that he now 
feels that such a device is unnecessary and the section is sufficiently clear as it stands. 

7. AS I LAY DYING, 1930 

As I Lay Dying was published in 1930, a year after the appearance 
of The Sound and the Fury. "I wrote As I Lay Dying in six weeks, 
without changing a word," Faulkner said in 1932 (in the intro- 
duction to the Modern Library Sanctuary), and this has often been 
interpreted to mean that it was not revised. However, Faulkner 
has said elsewhere that writing this book "was not easy. No honest 
work is," and both manuscript and the bound typescript show 
considerable revision by the author. 

1 For a reproduction of the last page of the manuscript, see The Princeton Uni- 
versity Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate III. 

17 



45- As I Lay Dying. New York, Jonathan Cape: Harrison Smith 
[1930]. First state of first edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734 
•92.313] 

46. As I Lay Dying. Second state of first edition, with the initial 
"I" on p. 11 correctly aligned. [Lent by James B. Meri- 
wether] 

47. Page 32 of the manuscript of As I Lay Dying. 2 [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

48. Bound typescript of As I Lay Dying. 266 pp. [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

Opened to p. 78 for comparison with p. 32 of the manuscript. 

49. Tandis que J 'Agonise. Burins de Courtin. Paris, Editions 
Jean Boisseau, 1946. Translation into French by Maurice E. 
Coindreau. No. 5 (of 10 "hors commerce") of 210 copies. 
[Lent by Maurice E. Coindreau] 

50. Typewritten letter from Faulkner to Maurice E. Coindreau, 
February 26, 1937, about the translation of As I Lay Dying. 3 
[Manuscripts Division] 

51. Medan jag lag och dog. Stockholm, Albert Bonniers Forlag 
[1948]. Translation into Swedish by Marten Edlund. [Lent by 
Random House] 

52. Uitvaart in Mississippi. Amsterdam, Uitgeverij de Bezige Bij, 
1955. Translation into Dutch by Apie Prins and John Van- 
denbergh. [Lent by Random House] 

53. Mientras Agonizo. Madrid, Aguilar, 1954. Translation into 
Spanish by Agustin Caballero Robredo and Arturo del Hoyo. 
[Lent by Random House] 

54. Kun tein Kuolemaa. [Helsinki], Kustannusosakeyhtio Tammi 
[1952]. Translation into Finnish by Alex. Matson. [3734.92 
.313.8] 

8. SANCTUARY, 1931 

Sanctuary, published by Cape and Smith in February, 1931, was 
Faulkner's first popular success. For the Modern Library issue 

2 For a reproduction of the last page of the manuscript, see The Princeton Uni- 
versity Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate V. 

s This letter was reproduced as an illustration in The Princeton University Li- 
brary Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate II. 

18 



in 1932 he supplied an introduction which explained how he wrote 
the original version — "the most horrific tale I could imagine" — 
deliberately to make money. It was rejected by his publisher. Later 
on the publisher changed his mind, and sent the galley proofs to 
the author. "I saw that it was so terrible," Faulkner said, describ- 
ing his reaction to the galleys, "that there were but two things to 
do: tear it up or rewrite it." He chose rewriting; how extensive 
the process was can be seen by the comparison of the manuscript, 
typescript, and galleys of the original version with the finished 
book. 

55. Sanctuary. New York, Jonathan Cape & Harrison Smith [1931]. 
First edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.382, copy 1] 

56. Sanctuary. With an introduction by William Faulkner. New 
York, The Modern Library [1932]. First Modern Library 
issue. Binding variant in green cloth, in dust jacket. [Lent 
by Linton R. Massey] 

The introduction is printed on two pages. In later impressions of the Modern 
Library issue the introduction is printed on four pages. 

57. Four manuscript pages of the original version of Sanctuary: 
1, 9, 15, and 131. 4 [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 12 

The beginning of the original version, as shown by manuscript p. 1, is the de- 
scription of the Negro murderer that appears at the beginning of Chapter XVI of 
the published book. Manuscript p. 131 shows a discarded beginning of the original 
version, the trial scene that appears near the end of the published book. 

58. Bound typescript of Sanctuary. 359 pp. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

Opened to pp. 56 verso and 57 for comparison with pp. 9 and 15 of the manuscript. 

59. Galley proofs of the beginning of the original version of Sanc- 
tuary. [Lent by Linton R. Massey] 

60. Sanctuary. New York, Jonathan Cape & Harrison Smith 
[1931]. "Sixth Printing, July, 1931". [Lent by James B. Meri- 
wether] 

Sanctuary went through six printings between February and July, 1931, all of 
them under the Cape and Smith imprint. 

61. Sanctuary. New York, Harrison Smith and Robert Haas [date 
uncertain]. "Sixth Printing, July, 1931". [Lent by James B. 
Meriwether] 

This copy of the "Sixth Printing" bears the imprint of Smith and Haas, the suc- 
cessors to Cape and Smith who published Faulkner after 1931, though the format is 
similar to that of the Modern Library issue and it contains the later, four-page 
version of the Modern Library introduction. 

4 Page 1 of the manuscript was reproduced as an illustration in The Princeton 
University Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate IV. 

19 



62. Sanctuary. Paris, Crosby Continental Editions, 1932. [Lent 
by Miss Mary Killgore] 

63. Sanctuaire. Preface d'Andre Malraux. [Paris], Gallimard 
[ ] 933]- Translation into French by R. N. Raimbault and 
Henri Delgove. [Lent by Maurice E. Coindreau] 

This copy contains a presentation inscription from the translators to Mr. Coin- 
dreau. 

64. Die Freistatt. Zurich, Artemis- Verlag [1951]. Translation into 
German by Herberth E. Herlitschka. [Ex 3734.92.382.7] 

65. Santuario. [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori [1946]. Translation 
into Italian by Paola Ojetti Zamattio. [Lent by Random 
House] 

66. Santuario. Sao Paulo, Instituto Progresso Editorial [1948]. 
Translation into Portuguese by Ligia Junqueira Smith. [Lent 
by Random House] 

67. Det Allra Heligaste. Stockholm, Albert Bonniers Forlag, 1951. 
Translation into Swedish by Marten Edlund. [Lent by Ran- 
dom House] 

68. Det A Her Helligste. Oslo, Gyldendal Norsk Forlag, 1951. 
Translation into Norwegian by Leo Str0m. [Lent by Random 
House] 

69. Sanctuary. [Tokyo, Getuyo ShobS Company, 1950.] Transla- 
tion into Japanese by Naotaro Tatsunokuchi and Masami 
Nishikawa. [Lent by Carvel Collins] 

9. THESE 13, 1931 

Faulkner's first collection of short stories, These 13, followed soon 
after the success of Sanctuary. Published in September, 1931, it 
was the first of his books to be brought out simultaneously in 
trade and limited, signed issues. Seven of its thirteen stories were 
published for the first time. 

70. These 13. New York, Jonathan Cape & Harrison Smith [1931]. 
First trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.389] 

71. These 13. Limited, signed issue. No. 286 of 299 copies. [Ex 
3734-92-389- 11 ] 

72. 'A Rose for Emily." The Forum, LXXXIII (April, 1930), 
233-238. [0901.F747] 

20 



Aside from his brief pieces of fiction in The Mississippian and the Times-Picayune, 
Faulkner's first published short story was "A Rose for Emily," in 1930. It was slightly 
revised for its appearance in These 13. 

73. First page of the manuscript of "A Rose for Emily." [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

74. Treize Histoires. [Paris], Gallimard [1939]. Translation into 
French by R. N. Raimbault and Ch. P. Vorce with the col- 
laboration of M. E. Coindreau. [Ex 3734.92.3915.6] 

"Une Rose pour Emily," translated by Mr. Coindreau, pp. [i35]-i46.s 

75. "Ad Astra." American Caravan IV, New York, The Macaulay 
Company, 1931, pp. 164-181. [3588.668] 

The short story "Ad Astra" first appeared in the fourth volume of American 
Caravan, an annual anthology of American writing. It was considerably revised for 
These 13. 

76. Page 1 of the manuscript of 'Ad Astra." [Lent by Mr. Faulk- 
ner] 

77. "Red Leaves." The Saturday Evening Post, October 25, 1930, 
pp. 6-7, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64. [ogoi.S254q] 

One of the best stories in These 13 is "Red Leaves," the first of several stories 
about the Indians in north Mississippi which Faulkner published in the 1930's. Like 
the other previously published stories in These 13, it was revised from its periodical 
appearance, and the manuscript and typescript differ from each other and from 
both published versions. 

78. Page 1 of the manuscript of "Red Leaves." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

79. Page 1 of carbon typescript of "Red Leaves." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

80. Questi Tredici. Turin, Lattes [1948]. Translation into Italian 
by Francesco Lo Bue. [Lent by Random House] 

"Foglie Rosse," pp. 113 ff. 

10. IDYLL IN THE DESERT AND 
MISS ZILPHIA GANT 

81. Idyll in the Desert. New York, Random House, 1931. No. 40 
of 400 copies, signed by the author. [Ex 3734.92.348] 

The short story Idyll in the Desert, issued in a limited, signed edition of 400 
copies in December, 1931, and never reprinted, was the first Faulkner title to be 
published by Random House. 

5 This translation, the first work of Faulkner to appear in France, was first pub- 
lished in Commerce, XXIX (1932). For a reproduction of a letter, April 14, 1932, 
from Faulkner to Mr. Coindreau, which includes a comment on the translation, see 
The Princeton University Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate II. 

21 



82. First page of the manuscript of Idyll in the Desert. [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

83. Miss Zilphia Gant. [Dallas], The Book Club of Texas, 1932. 
No. 32 of 300 copies. [Ex 3734.92. 365] 

The short story Miss Zilphia Gant was issued in a limited edition of 300 copies 
by the Book Club of Texas in June, 1932, and has never been reprinted. Although 
in the prospectus which announced the book it was stated that "Mr. Faulkner tells 
us that 'Miss Zilphia Gant' is in reality the basis for a novel which he plans to write 
in the near future," it bears little resemblance to any of his subsequently published 
work. 

84. First page of the manuscript of Miss Zilphia Gant. [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

85. Page 1 of a typescript version, with manuscript corrections, 
of Miss Zilphia Gant. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

86. Certificate of copyright registration for Miss Zilphia Gant, 
from Copyright Office, Library of Congress. [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

It gives June 27, 1932, as the date of publication; July 2 as the date the affidavit 
was received; and July 5 as the date the copyright deposit copies were received. 

11. LIGHT IN AUGUST, 1932 

William Faulkner's eighth novel, Light in August, was published 
in October, 1932, by the new firm of Smith and Haas. On p. 340 
an error occurred in the first line, where the name "Jefferson" is 
printed instead of "Mottstown". This mistake was picked up as a 
"point" by early bibliographers of Faulkner, who believed that 
this error distinguished between two states of the first impression, 
as did the misaligned "I" in As I Lay Dying. That it is simply an 
error, and an uncorrected error, not a point, is shown by the fact 
that it persists in three subsequent Smith and Haas printings; in 
the English issue and the 1947 New Directions issue (both 
printed photographically from the Smith and Haas text); and in 
the 1950 resetting of the text for the Modern Library. 

87. Light in August. [New York], Harrison Smith & Robert Haas 
[1932]. First edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.358] 

88. Light in August. London, Chatto & Windus, 1933. First Eng- 
lish issue [Ex 3734.92.358.11] 

89. Manuscript pages of the beginning and end of Light in 
August: 2 and 187. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

22 



go. Light in August. [Norfolk, Conn., New Directions, 1947.] 
[Lent by James B. Meriwether] 

Opened to p. 271 for comparison with p. 110 of the manuscript. 

91. Page 1 10 of the manuscript of Light in August. [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

That Faulkner's revisions of the manuscript involved rearrangement of this epi- 
sode is indicated by the different page and chapter numbers which are cancelled. 

92. The first four printings of the Smith and Haas edition of 
Light in August and a remaindered copy of the fourth print- 
ing in a Random House binding. [Lent by James B. Meri- 
wether] 

93. Lumiere d'Aout. Paris, Gallimard [1935]. Translation into 
French by Maurice E. Coindreau. [3734.92.358.6] 

94. Luce d'Agosto. [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori [1954]. Trans- 
lation into Italian by Elio Vittorini. [Ex 3734-92.358.9] 

95. Licht im August. Berlin, Verlag Volk und Welt, 1957. Trans- 
lation into German by Franz Fein. [Ex 3734.92.358.6] 

96. Geboorte in Augustus. Amsterdam, Em. Querido, 1951. Trans- 
lation into Dutch by I. E. Prins-Willekes-Macdonald. [3734 
.92.358.8] 

97. M0rk August. Oslo, Gyldendal Norsk Forlag, 1951. Transla- 
tion into Norwegian by Sigurd Hoel. [Lent by Random 
House] 

98. Svetloba v Avgustu. Ljubljana, Cankarjeva Zalozba, 1952. 
Translation into Slovenian by Mira Mihelic. [Lent by Ran- 
dom House] 

12. A GREEN BOUGH, 1933 

In 1933 William Faulkner, now established and well known as a 
novelist and short story writer, brought out his second volume of 
poems, A Green Bough. It had been announced early in 1925, 
when Faulkner was in New Orleans, that he was preparing another 
book of verse for publication, and the dated manuscripts of several 
of the poems of A Green Bough show that they were written in 
the 1920's, but they were revised and tightened for book publica- 
tion. Since 1933 Faulkner's published work has been exclusively 
in prose forms. 

23 



gg. A Green Bough. New York, Harrison Smith and Robert Haas, 
ig33. First trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734^2. 341.11] 

100. A Green Bough. Limited, signed issue. No. 5 of 360 copies. 
[Ex 3734.g2.341] 

101. "My Epitaph." Contempo, I (February 1, ig32), 2. [Ex 3734 
.g2-326f, copy 1] 

The last poem in A Green Bough had been published twice before: as "My 
Epitaph" in an issue of Contempo devoted to Faulkner, and in pamphlet form, 
entitled This Earth. All three versions differ slightly. 

102. Typescript of Contempo text of "My Epitaph." 1 p. [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

103. This Earth. New York, Equinox, ig32. [Ex 3734.g2.3g1] 

104. Le Rameau Vert. Paris, Gallimard [ig55]. Bilingual edition 
of A Green Bough, with translation into French by R. N. 
Raimbault. [3734^2. 341. 8] 

105. Typescript of sonnet "Spring," dated "13 December, ig24" 
in Faulkner's hand. 1 p. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

The sonnet which appeared, untitled, as number XXXVI of the poems in A 
Green Bough had been previously published, in a slightly different version, in the 
Faulkner issue of Contempo, entitled "Spring." According to the date of this type- 
script of the Contempo version, it was originally written about the time of the 
publication of The Marble Faun. 

106. Typescript version of poem XXXII of A Green Bough, with a 
humorous inscription by Faulkner for Sam Gilmore, whom 
he knew in New Orleans in ig25- 1 p. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. 
See Fig. 4 

13. DOCTOR MARTINO AND OTHER 
STORIES, 1934 

Doctor Martino is Faulkner's second collection of short stories. 
Two of its fourteen stories were published for the first time, and 
only two of the twelve which had been previously published were 
revised for their appearance in the collection. 

107. Doctor Martino and other stories. New York, Harrison Smith 
and Robert Haas, ig34- First trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 

3734-92-33 1 - 11 ] 

108. Doctor Martino and other stories. Limited, signed issue. No. 
6g of 360 copies. [Ex 3734-92-33 1 ] 

log. First page of an untitled manuscript version of "There Was 
a Queen." [Lent by Linton R. Massey] 

24 



Although the short story "There Was a Queen" was not revised from its original 
periodical publication when it was included in Doctor Martino, the three manu- 
script and typescript versions exhibited all differ from the printed texts as well as 
from each other. 

1 10. First page of a manuscript version of "There Was a Queen" 
entitled "An Empress Passed," with cancelled title "Through 
the Window." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

111. First page of a typescript version of "There Was a Queen." 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

112. "Death-Drag." Scribner's Magazine, XCI (January, 1932), 
[34]-42. [0901.S436] 

Faulkner's interest in flying continued after his RAF service, as both the novel 
Pylon and the short story "Death-Drag" attest. 

113. Page 1 of the manuscript of "A Death-Drag." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

114. Le Docteur Martino et Aatres Histoires. [Paris], Gallimard 
[1948]. Translation into French by R. N. Raimbault and 
Ch. P. Vorce. [Ex 3734.92.331.8] 

"La Course a la Mort" ("Death Drag"), pp. [7i]-g2. 

115. "A Mountain Victory." The Saturday Evening Post, De- 
cember 3, 1932, pp. 6-7, 39, 42, 44, 45, 46. [ogoi.S254q] 

One of the best of the stories in Doctor Martino is "Mountain Victory," which 
was revised from its original appearance in The Saturday Evening Post. 

1 16. First page of the manuscript of "A Mountain Victory." [Lent 
by Mr. Faulkner] 

14. PYLON, 1935 

117. Pylon. New York, Harrison Smith and Robert Haas, Inc., 
1935. First trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734-92.374] 

118. Pylon. Limited, signed issue. No. 96 of 310 copies. [Ex 3734 
•92-374-13] 

Opened to the title-page and the folded, tipped-in reproduction of p. 58 of the 
manuscript. 

119. Page 78 of the typescript setting copy of Pylon. [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

120. Pylone. [Paris], Gallimard [1946]. Translation into French 
by R. N. Raimbault with the collaboration of G. Louis- 
Rousselet. [Lent by Random House] 

Opened to pp. [68]-6g, for comparison with p. 78 of the setting copy. 

25 



121. Unnumbered manuscript page of Pylon, containing a version 
of parts of pp. 9, 10, and 27 of the published book. [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 13 

122. Trekanten. Copenhagen, Winthers Forlag [1952]. Transla- 
tion into Danish by Peter Toubro. [Ex 3734.92.374.9] 

123. Pylon. Barcelona, Luis de Caralt [1947]. Translation into 
Spanish by Julio Fernandez-Yanez. [Lent by Random House] 

124. Wendemarke. Hamburg, Rowohlt [1951]. Translation into 
German by Georg Goyert. [3734.92.374.6] 

15. ABSALOM, ABSALOM! 1936 

Absalom, Absalom! was Faulkner's first novel published by Ran- 
dom House, who have been his publishers ever since. Faulkner ap- 
pended a chronology, a genealogy of the principal characters, and 
a map of Yoknapatawpha County to this volume, which appeared 
in October of 1936. 

125. Absalom, Absalom! New York, Random House, 1936. First 
trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.311, copy 1] 

126. Absalom, Absalom! Limited, signed issue. No. 187 of 300 
copies. [Ex 3734.92.311.11] 

127. First page of the final typescript of Absalom, Absalom! [Lent 
by Mr. Faulkner] 

128. Two pages from the typescript of a version of the first chap- 
ter of Absalom, Absalom!: 9 and 13, with manuscript anno- 
tations by Faulkner and his editor. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. 
See Fig. 14 

129. "Absalom, Absalom!" The American Mercury, XXXVIII 
(August, 1936), 466-474. [0901.A491] 

Opened to pp. 466-467, the beginning of a version of the first chapter of Absa- 
lom, Absalom! 

130. First manuscript page (unnumbered) of a version of the 
Chronology of Absalom, Absalom! [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

131. "Wash." Harper's Magazine, CLXVIII (February, 1934), 
[258]-266. [0901.H295] 

Opened to pp. [258J-25Q, the beginning of the story, which is an early version of 
the episode of Sutpen's death in Chapter VII of Absalom, Absalom! 

26 



132. Absalom, Absalom! Introduction by Harvey Breit. New York, 
The Modern Library [1951]. First Modern Library issue, 
in dust jacket. [Lent by Linton R. Massey; Library copy, 
L 3734-92-3 11 ] 

133. Absalon! Absalon! [Paris], Gallimard [1953]. Translation 
into French by R. N. Raimbault with the collaboration of 
Ch. P. Vorce. [Lent by Random House] 

134. Absalom, Absalom! Stuttgart, Rowohlt [1948]. Translation 
into German by Hermann Stresau. [Lent by Random House] 

135. Assalonne, Assalonne! [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori [1954]. 
Translation into Italian by Glauco Cambon. [Ex 3734.92 
.311.6] 

136. jAbsalon, Absalon! Buenos Aires, Emece Editores [1950]. 
Translation into Spanish by Beatriz Florencia Nelson. [Lent 
by Random House] 

16. THE UNVANQUISHED, 1938 

The Unvanquished, published in February, 1938, is a novel made 
from six previously published short stories, revised and with a 
seventh and concluding chapter, "An Odor of Verbena," added. 
The illustrations were made by Edward Shenton, who had pre- 
viously illustrated the magazine appearance of the sixth chapter. 

137. The Unvanquished. New York, Random House [1938]. First 
trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.393.11] 

138. The Unvanquished. Limited, signed issue. No. 90 of 250 
copies. [Ex 3734-92-393] 

Opened to p. 243, the beginning of "An Odor of Verbena." 

139. Page 1 of the manuscript of 'An Odor of Verbena." [Lent 
by Mr. Faulkner] 

140. Page 1 of the typescript of 'An Odor of Verbena." [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

141. "Skirmish at Sartoris." Scribner's Magazine, XCVII (April, 
!935). [i93]"2oo. [0901.S436] 

Opened to p. [193], the beginning of the story which was revised to become the 
sixth chapter of The Unvanquished. 

142. LTnvaincu. [Paris], Gallimard [1949]. Translation into 
French by R. N. Raimbault and Ch. P. Vorce. [Ex 3734 
•92-393-8] 

27 



143- Die Unbesiegten. Zurich, Fretz & Wasmuth Verlag [1954]. 
Translation into German by Erich Franzen. [3734.92.393.6] 

144. Gli Invitti. [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori, 1948. Translation 
into Italian by Alberto Marmont. [Ex 3734.92.393.7] 

145. Los Invictos. Barcelona, Luis de Caralt [1951]. Translation 
into Spanish by Alberto Vila de Aviles. [3734.92.393.9] 

146. De Obesegrade. Stockholm, Folket i Bilds Forlag [1948]. 
Translation into Swedish by Hakan Norlen. [Lent by Ran- 
dom House] 

17. THE WILD PALMS, 1939 

In form, The Wild Palms is one of Faulkner's most experimental 
novels. The action of the two sections of its double plot, "Wild 
Palms" and "Old Man," never combines. Printed in alternate 
chapters, their only unity is thematic. 

147. The Wild Palms. New York, Random House [1939]. First 
trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92. 397, copy 1] 

Opened to pp. 22-23, trie end of the first chapter of "Wild Palms" and the be- 
ginning of the first chapter of "Old Man." 

148. The Wild Palms. Limited, signed issue. No. 164 of 250 
copies. [Lent by Maurice E. Coindreau] 

Opened to p. 143, the beginning of the third chapter of "Old Man." 

149. Manuscript page (unnumbered) of the end of the first chap- 
ter of "Wild Palms." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

150. Manuscript (p. 92) of the beginning of the third chapter of 
"Old Man." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

151. Title-page of the typescript which was used as the setting 
copy of The Wild Palms, showing cancelled title, "If I For- 
get Thee, Jerusalem" (a reference to Psalms 137:5). [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

152. Pages 4 and 36 of the typescript setting copy of The Wild 
Palms, the first page of each section of the novel. [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

153. The Old Man. New York, New American Library [1948]. 
First Signet edition of this erroneously entitled paperback. 
[Lent by James B. Meriwether] 

28 



154- Les Palmiers Sauvages. [Paris], Gallimard [1952]. Transla- 
tion into French by M. E. Coindreau. [3734-92.397.6] 

155. Yasei no jo Netsu. [Tokyo], Mikasa Shobo [1951]. Transla- 
tion into Japanese by Yasuo Okubo. [Ex 3734.92.397.83] 

18. THE HAMLET, 1940 

Volume One of the Snopes trilogy, The Hamlet, was published in 
April, 1940. Faulkner had planned a novel about the Snopes fam- 
ily from the inception of the Yoknapatawpha series in the 1920's, 
and The Hamlet incorporates four previously published short 
stories which had appeared in the 1930's: "Fool About a Horse," 
"The Hound," "Spotted Horses," and "Lizards in Jamshyd's Court- 
yard." All were extensively revised for the book, which also makes 
use of material from the short stories "Barn Burning" and "After- 
noon of a Cow." 

156. The Hamlet. New York, Random House, 1940. First trade 
issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.342] 

157. The Hamlet. Limited, signed issue. No. 220 of 250 copies. 
[Lent by Maurice E. Coindreau] 

158. Bound carbon typescript of The Hamlet. 2 vols. [Lent by 
Phil Stone] 

Opened to p. 1 of the first volume, with manuscript dedication: "To My Godson, 
Philip Alston Stone | May he be faithful | fortunate, and brave | William Faulk- 
ner I Xmas 1945 I Oxford, Miss". 

The Hamlet is dedicated to Phil Stone, who wrote the preface to The Marble 
Faun, and with whom Faulkner had worked up many of the events of the Snopes 
stories in tall tales the two men told each other in the late 1920's. To Stone's son 
Philip, Faulkner presented this first carbon of the typescript setting copy of The 
Hamlet. Bound in two volumes, it is inscribed on the first page and signed on the 
last page of each. 

159. "Barn Burning." Harper's Magazine, CLXXIX (June, 1939), 
[86]-96. [0901. H295] 

Opened to p. [86], the beginning of the story. The short story "Barn Burning," 
first published in Harper's, was written to be the first chapter of The Hamlet, as the 
manuscript and typescript show. 

160. Page 1 of the manuscript of "Barn Burning." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner]. See Fig. 15 

161. Page 1 of the typescript of "Barn Burning." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

162. Page 58 of a manuscript version of the first part of the "Eula" 
section of The Hamlet, indicating that at one time Faulkner 

29 



planned to begin the section with what is the end of its first 
chapter in the published version. 6 [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

163. Page 317 of a typescript version of The Hamlet, in which the 
name Mordred (nicknamed "Maud") Snopes appears for 
the character Launcelot (nicknamed "Lump") Snopes of the 
published book. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

164. El Villorrio. Buenos Aires, Editorial Futuro [1947]. Trans- 
lation into Spanish by Raquel W. de Ortiz. [Lent by Random 
House] 

165. El Villorrio. Barcelona, Luis de Caralt [1953]. Translation 
into Spanish by J. Napoletano Torre and P. Carbo Amiguet. 
[ Ex 3734-92-342-8J 

19. GO DOWN, MOSES, 1942 

Go Down, Moses and Other Stories was published in May, 1942. 
Eight previously published short stories are incorporated into its 
seven sections, or chapters, but the volume has a basic unity which 
was emphasized in later printings by the omission of "and Other 
Stories" from the title. 

166. Go Down, Moses and Other Stories. New York, Random 
House [1942]. Presumable first state of the binding, first 
trade issue, in black cloth, with top edges stained red; in dust 
jacket. [Lent by Linton R. Massey] 

167. Go Down, Moses and Other Stories. Variant state of the 
binding, first trade issue, in red cloth, with top edges un- 
stained; in dust jacket. [Ex 3734-92.339] 

Several other binding variants of the first impression have been noted. 

168. Go Down, Moses and Other Stories. Limited, signed issue. 
No. 12 of 100 copies. [Lent by Linton R. Massey] 

This is the smallest of the limited issues of Faulkner's books, and the most difficult 
to obtain at the present time. 

169. Go Down, Moses. New York, The Modern Library [1955]. 
First Modern Library edition, in dust jacket. [Lent by Alex- 
ander D. Wainwright] 

170. Page 1 of a typescript version of "Was," the first section of 
Go Down, Moses. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 16 

6 For a reproduction of the first page of the manuscript of The Hamlet, see The 
Princeton University Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate VI. 

30 



The "Bayard" who narrates this story is a nine-year-old boy, the Bayard Sartoris 
of The Unvanquished. This is the only section of the book from which no part had 
been previously published. 

171. Page 1 of a typescript, with alternate titles "An Absolution" 
and "Apotheosis," of a story, unpublished in this form, 
which was incorporated into the second section of Go Down, 
Moses, "The Fire and the Hearth." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. 
See Fig. 17 

172. "Lion." Harper's Magazine, CLXXII (December, 1935), 
[67]-77. [0901. H295] 

The longest chapter of Go Down, Moses is the fifth, entitled "The Bear." An early 
version of this section had been published in 1935, entitled "Lion," and a version 
of part of the section appeared, entitled "The Bear," in The Saturday Evening 
Post, May 9, 1942, just two days before the publication date of the book. 

173. Page 186 of the typescript setting copy of Go Down, Moses, 
the first page of "The Bear," showing cancelled original title 
of the section, "Lion." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

"The Bear" contains some of Faulkner's most complex writing, and his note on 
p. 253 of the typescript setting copy indicates that it might have presented dif- 
ficulties for editor and printer as well as the reader: "This is the section referred 
to in Red Underlining in note 9 Nov 41. Set it as written, without caps or stops 
at beginning and end of paragraphs. Unless put there by me. . . ." 

174. "The Bear." The Saturday Evening Post, May 9, 1942, [30]- 
31, 74, 76, 77. [ogoi.S254q] 

Opened to pp. [3o]-3i, showing the beginning of the story and the illustrations 
by Edward Shenton. 

175. Page 3 of a typescript version of "Delta Autumn," the sixth 
section of Go Down, Moses. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

176. Page 6 of a typescript version of the title story and concluding 
section of Go Down, Moses. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

177. Manuscript page of genealogy of McCaslin family in Go 
Down, Moses. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

The genealogy differs in several particulars from the family as it appears in the 
published book, although Faulkner included no such genealogical chart in it. 

McCaslin : 1 Beauchamp 



Buck Buddy Mary Edmonds 

I I 

Isaac Carothers E. 

I 
Zack 

Carothers 



Eunice. N 



Tomey's Turl. N 



Lucas Beauchamp 
31 



178. jDesciende, Moises! Barcelona, Luis de Caralt [1955]. Trans- 
lation into Spanish by Ana-Maria de Foronda. [Lent by 
Random House] 

179. Descends, Mo'ise. Paris, Gallimard [1955]. Translation into 
French by R. N. Raimbault. [Lent by Random House] 

180. Scendi, Mose. [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori, 1947. Transla- 
tion into Italian by Edoardo Bizzarri. [Ex 3734.92.339.58] 

181. Das Verworfene Erbe. Stuttgart, Scherz & Goverts Verlag 
[1953]. Translation into German by Hermann Stresau. 

[3734-92-339-9] 

20. INTRUDER IN THE DUST, 1948 

Faulkner's first book in more than six years, Intruder in the Dust 
was published in September, 1948. It was his first book since 1932 
to appear without a limited, signed issue. 

182. Intruder in the Dust. New York, Random House [1948]. 
First edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.349] 

183. Intruder in the Dust. A copy of the second printing, signed 
by the author; in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.349.11] 

Opened to the first page of the text. 

184. Manuscript page of the beginning of Intruder in the Dust. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

185. Manuscript p. 65 of dialogue between the sheriff, Miss Haber- 
sham, and Stevens, from a version of Intruder in the Dust. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

186. Page 29 of typescript setting copy of Intruder in the Dust, 
with manuscript corrections. 7 [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

187. Inkrdktare i Stoftet. Stockholm, Albert Bonniers Forlag 
[1950]. Translation into Swedish by Th. Warburton. [Lent 
by Random House] 

188. Intruso en el Polvo. Buenos Aires, Editorial Losada [1951]. 
Translation into Spanish by Aida Aisenson. [Lent by Ran- 
dom House] 

189. Griff in den Staub. Zurich, Fretz & Wasmuth Verlag [1951]. 
Translation into German by Harry Kahn. [3734.92.349.7] 

1 For a reproduction of p. 65 of the corrected typescript, see The Princeton Uni- 
versity Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate VII. 

32 



190. L'Intrus. [Paris], Gallimard [1952]. Translation into French 
by R. N. Raimbault. [Lent by Random House] 

191. Non si Fruga nella Polvere. [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori, 
1956. Translation into Italian by Fernanda Pivano. [Ex 
3734-92-349-S] 

192. Intruder in the Dust. [Tokyo], Hayakawa ShobS [1951]. 
Translation into Japanese by Shozo Kato. [Lent by Random 
House] 

193. Ongenode Gast. Amsterdam, Wereld-Bibliotheek, 1951. 
Translation into Dutch by Apie Prins. [Lent by Random 
House] 

194. Ubuden Gaest i St0vet. Copenhagen, Aschehoug Dansk For- 
lag, 1950. Translation into Danish by Mogens Boisen. [Lent 
by Random House] 

21. KNIGHT'S GAMBIT, 1949 

Knight's Gambit, published in November, 1949, collects five pre- 
viously published short stories, and prints for the first time the 
title story, a 33,000-word novella rewritten for this volume from 
an unpublished short story. All six pieces are detective stories in 
which Gavin Stevens is the main character. 

195. Knight's Gambit. New York, Random House [1949]. First 
edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734-92.352] 

196. Page 1 of the manuscript of "Smoke." [Lent by Mr. Faulk- 
ner] 

The first story in Knight's Gambit is "Smoke," which was originally published in 
Harper's in April, 1932, and reprinted in Doctor Martino in 1934. The first page 
of the setting copy of this story, for Knight's Gambit, was typescript; tear sheets 
from Doctor Martino were used for the remainder of the setting copy, and tear sheets 
from their magazine appearances were used for the setting copy of the other four 
previously published stories of the book. 

197. Typescript setting copy of the beginning of "Smoke." [Lent 
by Mr. Faulkner] 

198. Tear sheet, p. 121, of the second page of "Smoke," from 
Doctor Martino, used as setting copy. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

199. "An Error in Chemistry." Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, 
VII (June, 1946), 5-19. [Ex 3734-92-3315] 

"An Error in Chemistry," the fifth story of Knight's Gambit, was first published 
in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine in 1946. It had been one of 838 manuscripts 

33 



submitted for the First Annual Detective Short-Story Contest sponsored by the 
magazine, in which it won second prize of $500.00 and high praise from the judges, 
while missing first prize of $2,000.00 by a single vote. 

In their introduction to the story's magazine publication, the editors called it a 
"strange story of almost pure detection . . . stylized, morbid, mystical, and sharply 
and brilliantly narrated." 

200. The Queen's Awards, 1946. Edited by Ellery Queen [pseud.]. 
Boston, Little, Brown and Company, 1946. First edition, in 
dust jacket. [Ex 3734-92-375] 

First book appearance of "An Error in Chemistry," pp. [23]-42. 

201. First page of the typescript setting copy of "Knight's Gam- 
bit." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

202. Page 22 of a carbon typescript version of the original short 
story "Knight's Gambit." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

This final page of the story is very similar to the ending of the published novella, 
although here the narrator and nephew of Gavin Stevens is Charles Weddel, not 
Charles Mallison. 

203. Knight's Gambit. Tokyo, Yukei-sha, 1951. Translation into 
Japanese by Yasuo Okubo. [Lent by Random House] 

204. Gambito de Caballo. Buenos Aires, Emece Editores [1951]. 
Translation into Spanish by Lucrecia Moreno de Saenz. 
[Lent by Random House] 

205. Le Gambit du Cavalier. [Paris], Gallimard [1951]. Transla- 
tion into French by Andre du Bouchet. [Lent by Random 
House] 

22. COLLECTED STORIES, 1950 

Collected Stories of William Faulkner, published in August, 1950, 
was Faulkner's third miscellaneous collection of short stories and 
his first since 1934. During those sixteen years many of his stories 
had been brought together in volumes like The Unvanquished, 
The Hamlet, Go Down, Moses, and Knight's Gambit, and these 
were omitted from Collected Stories, which reprinted forty-two of 
the forty-six stories published since 1930 which had not been in- 
corporated into less miscellaneous collections. 

206. Collected Stories of William Faulkner. New York, Random 
House [1950]. First edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.1950] 

207. Page 1 of the typescript, with manuscript corrections, of an 
early version of "Shall Not Perish." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

One of several Faulkner short stories about World War II, "Shall Not Perish" 
was published in 1943 and reprinted in Collected Stories. 

34 



208. Page 1 of carbon typescript of "Shall Not Perish." [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

On the verso of this page is part of a version of the story "A Courtship," which 
was apparently written about the same time as "Shall Not Perish" but remained un- 
published until 1948. 

209. " 'Once Aboard the Lugger.' " Contempo, I (February 1, 
1932), [1], 4. Entire number printed on green stock. [Ex 
3734-92-326f, copy 2] 

One of four uncollected Faulkner short stories. 

210. Page 1 of the manuscript of "Thrift." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

Another uncollected story, "Thrift" was published in The Saturday Evening 
Post, September 6, 1930. 

211. Page 1 of a typescript of "The Wishing-Tree." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

Faulkner originally wrote this unpublished children's story in the 1920's for 
Margaret Brown, the daughter of one of his teachers at the University of Mississippi. 
More than twenty years later he made a copy for his godchild, Philip Stone. 

212. Page 1 of a later typescript of "The Wishing-Tree," inscribed 
by the author: "For Philip Stone II. | from his God-father | 
William Faulkner | Oxford. | Xmas 1948". [Lent by Phil 
Stone] 

213. First page of a typescript version of "With Caution and Dis- 
patch," on verso of p. 530 of the setting copy of The Hamlet. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

This unpublished story deals with Bayard Sartoris and his adventures in the 
RFC in World War I. Several pages of one version of the story appear on the back 
of the typescript setting copy of The Hamlet, which might indicate that this ver- 
sion was written about 1939, although the other stories ("All the Dead Pilots" 
and "Ad Astra"), and the novel Sartoris, in which Bayard Sartoris appears, appar- 
ently date from at least ten years earlier. 

214. First page of another typescript version of "With Caution 
and Dispatch." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 25 

215. Page 1 of the typescript of "The Big Shot." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

According to the sending schedule of his stories which Faulkner kept for a time, 
The Saturday Evening Post turned down this story in April, 1930. Although it re- 
mained unpublished, Faulkner used one part of it, the episode of a poor boy's re- 
jection by the upper class, in the novel Absalom, Absalom! six years later, where it 
provides a spur to the ambition of an earlier kind of "big shot," Thomas Sutpen. 

216. Sending schedule of short stories. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

For the first two years of the 1930's Faulkner kept on this sheet of cardboard a 
record of the stories he sent to various magazines and agents. He drew a circle 
around each title when it was accepted. 

35 



23. REQUIEM FOR A NUN, 1951 

Requiem for a Nun, published in September, 1951, is a novel in 
the form of a three-act play with a narrative prologue to each act. 
Adaptations for the stage have been produced in Switzerland, Ger- 
many, France, Spain, Greece, Holland, and Sweden. 8 

217. Requiem for a Nun. New York, Random House [1951]. 
First trade issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.376] 

218. Requiem for a Nun. Limited, signed issue. No. 606 of 750 
copies. [Ex 3734-92.376-ii] 

219. Page 100 of the typescript of a version of Requiem for a Nun, 
showing the beginning of the narrative prologue of Act II. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

In the published book this material appears at the end of the prologue (pp. 
1 10-1 11). 

220. Manuscript of the first page of Act II of Requiem for a Nun. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

221. Two typescript versions of the first page of the narrative pro- 
logue to Act I of Requiem for a Nun. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

222. Four examples, from the galley proof of the book, of Faulk- 
ner's revisions in Requiem for a Nun. [Lent by Mr. Faulk- 
ner] 

a. Galley proof of the end of Act II. 

b. Galley proof of the beginning of the narrative prologue to Act III, with an 
author-to-editor note. Exhibited, for comparison, with a copy of the book opened 
to pp. 212-213. 

c. Galley proof from Act II, Scene 1, with manuscript additions. 

d. Galley proof of the final scene, with manuscript additions. See Fig. 22 

223. An author-to-editor manuscript note about the title of the 
narrative prologue to Act II. [Lent by Saxe Commins] 

Re Title — Act II — The Golden Dome 

(Beginning Was — ) 
What I wanted here was to paraphrase Eliot, 

'In the beginning was the Word, 
Superfetation of T b %v-' 
I dont know Greek. 
Can we use 

(Beginning Was to |j<)? 
If not, 

(Beginning Was the Word) 

The quotation is from T. S. Eliot, "Mr. Eliot's Sunday Morning Service." In the 
published book the title became "The Golden Dome (Beginning Was the Word)." 

8 The play was first produced in this country in Ruth Ford's version a year and 
a half after this exhibition had closed. Following is a chronological list of pro- 

36 



224- Requiem pour une nonne [Paris], Gallimard [1956]. First 
edition of the stage adaptation by Albert Camus. [Ex 3734 
•92-376-7] 

225. Program of the 1956 Paris production of the Camus adapta- 
tion of Requiem pour une nonne, given at the Theatre des 
Mathurins. [Theatre Collection] 

226. Poster for the 1956 Paris production of Requiem pour une 
nonne at the Theatre des Mathurins. [Theatre Collection] 

227. Requiem fur eine Nonne. Frankfurt am Main, S. Fischer 
Verlag [1956]. The text of Robert Schnorr's German adapta- 
tion, reproduced from typewritten copy. [Ex 3734.92.376.9 
.11] 

228. Program of the German production of Requiem fur eine 
Nonne, given during the 1956-1957 season at the Schlosspark 
Theater in Berlin. [Theatre Collection] 

229. Poster for the 1956-1957 Berlin production of Requiem fur 
eine Nonne at the Schlosspark Theater. [Theatre Collection] 

230. Photograph of a scene from the 1956-1957 Berlin production 
of Requiem fur eine Nonne. [Theatre Collection] 

231. Requiem for a Nun. London, Chatto & Windus, 1953. First 
English edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.376.12] 

232. Requiem fur eine Nonne. Zurich, Fretz & Wasmuth Verlag 
[1956]. Translation into German by Robert Schnorr. [Ex 

3734-92-37 6 -9] 

233. Requiem para una Mujer. Buenos Aires, Emece Editores 
[1952]. Translation into Spanish by Jorge Zalamea. [Lent by 
Random House] 

ductions of the play (the date given is of the opening only) through the spring 
of 1960: Switzerland (Zurich, October 1955); Germany (Berlin, November 1955); 
Spain (Barcelona, February 1956; Madrid, December 1956); Sweden (Gothenburg, 
February 1956); Holland (Amsterdam, February 1956); France (Paris, November 
1956); Greece (Athens, March 1957); England (London, November 1957); Denmark 
(Copenhagen, March 1958); Argentina (Buenos Aires, September 1958); Italy 
(various cities, beginning with Florence, November 1958); Mexico (Mexico City, 
1958); United States (New York, January 1959); Brazil (October 1959); Yugoslavia 
(October 1959). The American production appeared in New Haven and Boston 
before it reached New York, and it is likely that some of the foreign productions 
also had road tours, before or after appearing in the cities noted here. I am 
indebted to Miss Anne Louise Davis of Harold Ober Associates, Faulkner's agent, 
for supplying me with much of this information. 

37 



234- Requiem per una Monaca. [Milan], Arnoldo Mondadori, 
1955. Translation into Italian by Fernanda Pivano. [Ex 3734 
.92.376.8] 

235. Requiem pour une Nonne. Preface d'Albert Camus. Paris, 
Gallimard [1957]. Translation into French by M. E. Coin- 
dreau. [Ex 3734.92.376-6] 

24. A FABLE, 1954 

A Fable was published in August, 1954. Begun in December, 1944, 
and not completed until November, 1953, it is one of Faulkner's 
longest and most complex novels. 

236. A Fable. [New York], Random House [1954]. First trade 
issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734.92.332.11] 

237. A Fable. Limited, signed issue. No. 600 of 1,000 copies. [Ex 
3734-92.332] 

238. Fine Legende. Stuttgart, Scherz & Goverts Verlag [1955]. 
Translation into German by Kurt Heinrich Hansen. [3734 
•92-333-7] 

239. Una Fdbula. Mexico City, Editorial Cumbre [1955]. Trans- 
lation into Spanish by Antonio Ribera. [Lent by Random 
House] 

240. Uma Fdbula. S. Paulo, Editora Merito [1956]. Translation 
into Portuguese by Olivia Krahenbiihl. [Ex 3734.92.332.7] 

241. Notes on a Horsethief. Greenville, Miss., The Levee Press, 
1950 [1951]- An out-of-series copy of an edition of 975 num- 
bered copies. [Lent by Hodding Carter; Library copy (No. 
247), Ex 3734.92.368] 

In 1951 the Levee Press of Greenville, Mississippi, brought out in a limited, signed 
edition Notes on a Horsethief, an earlier version of the episode that occurs on pp. 
151-189 of A Fable. This copy was inscribed by Faulkner for Hodding Carter, editor 
of the Delta Democrat-Times and co-owner, with Ben Wasson, of the Levee Press. 
According to Carter, Faulkner's original title for the work was "A Dangling Par- 
ticiple from Work in Progress," and at one time the excerpt was so punctuated as 
to form only one or two sentences. 

242. Page 267 of the typescript setting copy of A Fable, showing 
part of the Notes on a Horsethief episode as it occurs in the 
novel. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

Exhibited, for comparison, with a copy of Notes on a Horsethief opened to pp. 
64-65. 

38 



243- Final typescript of A Fable, used as setting copy. 691 pp. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

244. Two typescript pages with manuscript corrections from A 
Fable: 120-Z-7 and 120-Z-8. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

245. Two pages of manuscript additions to the typescript of A 
Fable: inserts 17 and 18. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

25. BIG WOODS, 1955 

Big Woods, published in October, 1955, is a collection of four pre- 
viously published hunting stories. Five brief narrative pieces are 
used, at the beginning and end of the book, and between each 
story, to set or change the mood; Faulkner has described them, in 
an interview in The New York Times Book Review, January 30, 
x 955> as "interrupted catalysts." 

246. Big Woods. New York, Random House [1955]. First edition, 
in dust jacket. [Ex 3734-92.317] 

247. Manuscript page of a draft of Faulkner's dedication to his 
editor, Saxe Commins. [Lent by Saxe Commins] 

248. "Race at Morning." The Saturday Evening Post, March 5, 
»955» PP- 26 " 2 7> 10 3> 10 4. 106. [Ex 3734-92] 

This story was slightly revised for the book. 

249. Tear sheet of "A Bear Hunt." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

"A Bear Hunt," the third story in Big Woods, was revised from its appearance 
in the 1950 Collected Stories. This tear sheet of the earlier version, with Faulkner's 
manuscript corrections (p. 79), is part of the setting copy for Big Woods. 

250. Tear sheet of "The Bear." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

Big Woods includes four of the five sections of "The Bear" from Go Down, Moses. 
This page from the setting copy, a tear sheet from Go Doiun, Moses (p. 254), shows 
the ending of the third section and the beginning of the omitted fourth section. 

251. The last two pages of the typescript setting copy of the epi- 
logue. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

The conclusion of Big Woods is an epilogue revised from "Delta Autumn," the 
sixth section of Go Down, Moses. These two pages of the typescript setting copy 
show manuscript revisions by author and editor. 

252. Drawings by Edward Shenton for Big Woods. [Lent by Ed- 
ward Shenton] 

The decorations for Big Woods were drawn by Edward Shenton, who had il- 
lustrated The Unvanquished and had supplied the drawings for the May 9, 1942 
Saturday Evening Post version of "The Bear." Shown are the originals for the 
following decorations in the book: 

39 



a. Bear paw print, half title 

b. Head of dog, p. [1] 

c. Boy by tree, p. [9] 

d. Snake, p. [99] 

e. Deer and hunters, p. [111] 

f. Bird and steamboat, p. [139] 

g. Man between plow handles, p. [143] 
h. Deer in flood waters, p. [165] 

i. Deer pursued by dogs, p. [173] 

26. THE SNOPESES OF YOKNAPATAWPHA, 

1929-1957 

The Snopes family, who supplied the major characters of The 
Hamlet and The Town, published in 1940 and 1957, have also 
appeared as minor characters in novels and in short stories since 
the beginning of the Yoknapatawpha series in 1929. This section 
of the exhibition traces chronologically the development of the 
family in Faulkner's fiction, both published and unpublished. 

253. Sartoris. New York, Harcourt, Brace and Company [1929]. 
[Ex 3734-92-383] 

The first book in the Yoknapatawpha series, Sartoris, contains the first published 
reference to the tribe of Snopes. Flem, Byron, and Montgomery Ward Snopes all 
make their first appearance in Sartoris, which provides this description of the pro- 
genitor of the tribe (p. 172): 

Flem, the first Snopes, had appeared unheralded one day behind the counter 
of a small restaurant on a side street. . . . With this foothold and like Abraham 
of old, he brought his blood and legal kin household by household, individual 
by individual, into town, and established them where they could gain money. 

254. The Sound and the Fury. New York, Jonathan Cape and 
Harrison Smith [1929]. [Ex 3734.92.386] 

The second published appearance of the Snopes family is in The Sound and the 
Fury (published in October, 1929), where I. O. Snopes appears briefly (p. 271). 

255. As I Lay Dying. New York, Jonathan Cape: Harrison Smith 
[1930]. [Ex 3734.92.313] 

The third published appearance of the Snopeses occurs in As I Lay Dying, where 
mention is made of the episode (described fully the following year in "Spotted 
Horses") of Flem Snopes's sale of Texas ponies (p. 124). 

256. Sanctuary. New York, Jonathan Cape & Harrison Smith 
[1931]. [Ex 3734.92.382] 

In Sanctuary (published February, 1931) Virgil Snopes and Mississippi state sena- 
tor Clarence Snopes appear (pp. 208-209). 

257. "Spotted Horses." Scribner's Magazine, LXXXIX (June, 

1930' 5 8 5-597- [0901 -S436] 

"Spotted Horses," in the June 1931 issue of Scribner's, is the first Faulkner short 
story about the Snopeses. The unnamed first-person narrator is the same itinerant 

40 



sewing machine salesman who first appeared in Sartoris, named V. K. Suratt. In The 
Hamlet (1940) the same character appears as V. K. Ratliff, and "Spotted Horses," 
much revised, appears there in Book Four, "The Peasants." 

258. Unfinished autograph note, addressed to "Mr Thompson," 
and dating from 1931 or not long after, in which Faulkner 
identifies the unnamed narrator of "Spotted Horses" as 
Suratt. 1 p. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

"As you say, I am availing myself of my prerogative of using these people when 
and where I see fit. So far, I have not bothered much about chronology, which, if 
I am ever collected, I shall have to do. 

"'Spotted Horses' occurred about 1900, at Varner's Store, a village in the countv 
of which Jefferson is market town. Suratt must have been about 25. In Sartoris, 
1919, he is 45 say." 

259. Page 2 of the manuscript of "Father Abraham." [Lent by 
the New York Public Library]. See Fig. 18 

It is apparent that Faulkner planned a novel about the Snopes family at about 
the same time that Sartoris was written. The manuscript of the virtually com- 
pleted first chapter of the novel, entitled "Father Abraham," presents a version of 
the "Spotted Horses" episode which is closer to its appearance in The Hamlet than 
in "Spotted Horses." "Father Abraham" and another title, "Abraham's Children," 
which is given to a later typescript version of the episode, are reminiscent of the 
description in Sartoris of Flem's arrival in Jefferson. 

260. Page 18 of a typescript version of "Abraham's Children." 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 19 

261. The Hamlet. New York, Random House, 1940. [Ex 3734 
•92.342] 

Opened to pp. 324-325 for comparison with p. 18 of the typescript of "Abraham's 
Children." 

262. "The Hound." Harper's Magazine, CLXIII (August, 1931), 
[266]-274- Tear sheet of p. 271. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

In "The Hound," a short story published two months after "Spotted Horses," a 
store clerk in Frenchman's Bend named Snopes appears briefly. When the story 
was rewritten to become part of The Hamlet, the name of its central character was 
changed from Ernest Cotton to Mink Snopes. 

263. "Centaur in Brass." The American Mercury, XXV (Feb- 
ruary, 1932), 200-210. [Ex 3734.92.324] 

The short story "Centaur in Brass," originally published in February, 1932, was 
revised extensively to become part of The Town twenty-five years later. 

264. "Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard." The Saturday Evening 
Post, February 27, 1932, pp. 12-13, 5 2 > 57- [°9 01 -S254q] 

The short story "Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard," which also first appeared in 
February, 1932, was extensively revised to become the concluding episode of The 
Hamlet. 

265. Page 6 of a manuscript of "There Was a Queen." [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

41 



In the story "There Was a Queen," published in 1933, the episode in Sartoris of 
the anonymous letters sent by Byron Snopes to Narcissa Benbow is recalled. 

266. Page 17 of a typescript of "There Was a Queen." [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

267. Page 3 of a manuscript of "Mule in the Yard." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

"Mule in the Yard," which first appeared in 1934, was incorporated into The 
Town in 1957, with I. O. Snopes an important character in it. 

268. Page 7 of a typescript of "Mule in the Yard." [Lent by Mr. 
Faulkner] 

269. Page 1 of manuscript of "Fool About a Horse." [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 21 

There were no Snopeses in the original version of "Fool About a Horse," but it 
was rewritten as an episode in The Hamlet, four years later, with Ab Snopes as its 
principal character. The published short story version was narrated by a boy, the 
son of the unnamed principal character; in manuscript and typescript versions of 
the story, however, the narrator is identified as the V. K. Suratt who told the story 
of "Spotted Horses," and in one typescript version Faulkner has changed the nar- 
rator's references to the principal character from the "Pap" of the short story to the 
"Ab" [Snopes] of the version in The Hamlet. 

270. "Fool About a Horse." Scribner's Magazine, C (August, 
1936), [8o]-86. [0901.S436] 

271. Page 23 of typescript of "Fool About a Horse," with Suratt 
as narrator. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See Fig. 20 

272. Page 23 of carbon of above typescript with manuscript cor- 
rections of "Pap" to "Ab." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

273. Page 8 of typescript of "Fool About a Horse," with descrip- 
tion of Suratt's background as the son of a tenant farmer. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

"... a race existing in complete subjection not to modern exploitation but to 
an economic system stubbornly moribund out of the dark ages themselves, who had 
escaped his birthright and into independence and even pride." 

274. "The Unvanquished." The Saturday Evening Post, Novem- 
ber 14, 1936, pp. 12-13, 121, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130. [0901 
.S254q] 

Ab Snopes, the father of Flem, first appears in the short story "The Unvanquished," 
which was revised to form the chapter "Riposte in Tertio" of The Unvanquished 
(1938). 

275. "Vendee." The Saturday Evening Post, December 5, 1936, 
pp. 16-17, 86 > 8 7> 9°. 92, 93' 94- [o9°i- s 254q] 

The next appearance of Ab Snopes is in the story "Vendee," which was also to 
become a chapter in The Unvanquished. 

42 



276. The Unvanqaished. New York, Random House [1938]. 
[L 3734-92-392] 

Opened to p. 135, Ab Snopes's first book appearance in the Yoknapatawpha series. 

277. Typescript of "Afternoon of a Cow." 17 pp. [Manuscripts 
Division] 

In June, 1937, Faulkner gave a typescript of his unpublished story "Afternoon 
of a Cow" to Professor Maurice E. Coindreau, the translator of several of his works 
into French, who later presented it to the Princeton University Library. An episode 
of the story was drawn upon in The Hamlet, and the original story was published 
in Furioso in 1947. (A French translation, by Mr. Coindreau, was published in Fon- 
taine in 1943.) 

278. Page 17 of the manuscript of "Barn Burning," the end of 
the story. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

The story of Ab Snopes was continued in "Barn Burning," published in 1939. 
Originally intended as the first chapter of The Hamlet, it was drastically cut and 
rewritten to form one episode (pp. 15-21) of Chapter One of the published book. 
The central character is Ab's son, Colonel Sartoris ("Sarty") Snopes, who escapes 
from his father and his background at the end of the story. He does not appear 
in the published book. (See also Nos. 159-161.) 

279. The Hamlet. New York, Random House, 1940. [Ex 3734.92 
•342] 

Volume One of the Snopes trilogy. (See also Section XVIII.) 

280. Page 31 of the manuscript of The Hamlet, showing a change 
of the name Suratt to Ratliff. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

281. "My Grandmother Millard and General Bedford Forrest and 
the Battle of Harrykin Creek." Story, XXII (March-April, 
1943), 68-86. [0901.S888] 

Ab Snopes appears in "My Grandmother Millard," a Civil War story about the 
Sartoris family of The Unvanquishcd. 

282. Page 9 of typescript of "My Grandmother Millard." [Manu- 
scripts Division] 

283. "Mississippi." Holiday, XV (April, 1954), 33-47. [0901 
• H 732q] 

The coming of the Snopeses to Mississippi is described by Faulkner in his semi- 
fictional account of his native state, "Mississippi." 

284. Page 4 of typescript of "Mississippi." [Manuscripts Division] 

285. "By the People." Mademoiselle, XLI (October, 1955), 86-89, 
130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139. [Ex 3734.92 
■323] 

How V. K. Ratliff ended the political career of Clarence Snopes is told in "By 
the People," which brings the story of the Snopeses up to the period just after the 
Korean War.s 

9 This episode was included, with its date changed to the period just after World 
War II, in The Mansion (1959). 

43 



286. Page 5 of typescript of "By the People." [Manuscripts Divi- 
sion]. See Fig. 24 

287. The Town. New York, Random House [1957]. [Ex 3734.92 
•3925] 

Volume Two of the Snopes trilogy. (See also Section XXVII.) 

288. Last page of typescript setting copy of The Town. [Lent by 
Mr. Faulkner] 

The final page of The Town marks, for the present (1957), the last completed 
chapter in the chronicle of the Snopeses of Yoknapatawpha, although his publishers 
announce that Faulkner is now at work upon the third volume of the trilogy, The 
Mansion.™ 

27. THE TOWN, 1957 

The Town, published on May 1, 1957, is the middle volume of 
the Snopes trilogy, which chronicles the rise of Flem Snopes, the 
Snopes family, and the Snopes principles, in twentieth-century 
Yoknapatawpha County. The Hamlet (1940) is the first volume of 
the trilogy, which is to be completed by the publication in 1958 or 
1959 of The Mansion, upon which Faulkner is now working. 10 

289. The Town. New York, Random House [1957]. First trade 
issue, in dust jacket. [Ex 3734-92.3925] 

290. The Town. Limited, signed issue. No. 51 of 450 copies. [Ex 
3734-92.3925-n] 

291. Final typescript, used as setting copy, of The Town. 478 pp. 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

292. "The Waifs." The Saturday Evening Post, May 4, 1957, pp. 
27, 1 16, 118, 120. [Ex 3734.92] 

The final episode of The Town, the story of Byron Snopes's four half-Indian 
children, was also printed in The Saturday Evening Post (from galley proof of the 
book), under the title "The Waifs." (Faulkner's suggestion for the title was "Them 
Indians.") 

293. A manuscript worksheet for The Town. [Lent by Saxe Com- 
mins] 

294. Corrected galley proof of The Town: 1 l-A, 36-A, and 83-A. 11 
[Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

10 Published two years after the close of this exhibition: New York, Random 
House [1959]. 

11 For reproductions of two other sections of the corrected galley proof, see The 
Princeton University Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate VIII. 

44 



295- "Centaur in Brass." Collected Stories of William Faulkner, 
New York, Random House [1950], pp. 149-168. [Ex 3734.92 
•1950] 

The short story "Centaur in Brass," originally published in 1932, was incor- 
porated, extensively revised, into Chapter One of The Town. The original version 
had been reprinted, with a few changes, in the 1950 Collected Stories. 

296. Eight versions of the first page of "Mule in the Yard" (orig- 
inally published in 1934), the second of two previously pub- 
lished short stories incorporated into The Town. 

a. First page of manuscript of "Mule in the Yard." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner]. See 
Fig. 23 

b. First page of typescript of "Mule in the Yard." [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

c. "Mule in the Yard." Scribner's Magazine, XCVI (August, 1934), [65]. [0901 
.S436] 

d. "Mule in the Yard." Collected Stories of William Faulkner, New York, Random 
House [1950], p. 249. [Ex 3734-92-1950] 

e. Page 303 of typescript setting copy of The Town. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

f. Galley 75-A of The Town. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

g. Page [231] of page proof of The Town. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

h. Page [231] of foundry proof of The Town. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

297. The Town. First printing, opened to p. 327. [Ex 3734.92 
•3925] 

In the first printing of The Town a line on p. 327 was omitted and the space 
filled by a repetition of another line from the same page, apparently as the result 
of an accident at the press, as the passage is correct in galley, page, and foundry 
proof. 12 

298. Page 327 of page proof of The Town. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

28. ANTHOLOGIES 

An indication of the recent rapid growth in popularity of Faulk- 
ner's work has been the proliferation of anthologies of previously 
published material. 

299. Salmagundi. Milwaukee, The Casanova Press, 1932. No. 395 
of an edition of 525 copies. [Ex 3734.92.381, copy 2] 

A significant early appreciation of Faulkner's importance by Paul Romaine is the 
introduction to the collection Salmagundi, which he edited. The volume reprinted 
three essays and five poems by Faulkner from The Neiu Republic and The Double 
Dealer. 

300. A Rose for Emily and Other Stories by William Faulkner. 
[New York], Editions for the Armed Services, Inc. [Foreword 
dated April, 1945]. [Lent by Saxe Commins] 

Edited, and with a foreword, by Saxe Commins. A Rose for Emily and Other 
Stories is one of the paperback, pocket-sized Armed Services editions which were 
distributed to American servicemen overseas during and immediately after World 
War II. 

12 The error was corrected in the second printing. 

45 



301. The Portable Faulkner. Edited by Malcolm Cowley. New 
York, The Viking Press, 1946. First edition, in dust jacket. 
[Lent by Maurice E. Coindreau; Library copy, 3734.92.1946] 

A collection of short stories and excerpts from novels, with an influential intro- 
duction by Malcolm Cowley. 

302. The Indispensable Faulkner. New York, The Book Society 
[1950]. A copy of what appears to be the first issue under this 
imprint, in glassine wrapper, boxed. [Lent by James B. Meri- 
wether] 

A reprint of The Portable Faulkner, save for the omission of the map on the 
end papers. 

303. Mirrors of Chartres Street by William Faulkner. Introduc- 
tion by William Van O'Connor. [Minneapolis, Faulkner 
Studies, 1953.] No. 318 of an edition of 1,000 copies, in dust 
jacket. [Ex 3734-92.364] 

Eleven of Faulkner's 1925 sketches for the New Orleans Times-Picayune were 
reprinted in this volume, with badly mangled text. 

304. Review by Carvel Collins of Mirrors of Chartres Street. The 
New York Times Book Revieiv, February 7, 1954, p. 4. [DR 
0901.674^ 

After the appearance of this review which called attention to two more Faulkner 
sketches in the Times-Picayune, the editors of Faulkner Studies brought them out 
in the periodical and, later on, in a supplementary volume. Between the publica- 
tion of these two sketches in periodical and book form, an edition of all thirteen 
was published in Japan, under the title New Orleans Sketches, the text based on 
the Minneapolis versions. 

305. "Jealousy" and "Episode." Faulkner Studies, III (Winter, 
1954). OT-53- [ Ex 3734-92-666] 

306. Jealousy and Episode: Two Stories by William Faulkner. 
Minneapolis, Faulkner Studies, 1955. No. 279 of an edition 
of 500 copies. [Ex 3734.92.35 1] 

307. New Orleans Sketches by William Faulkner. Edited with 
notes by Ichiro Nishizaki. [Tokyo], Hokuseido [1955]. [3734 
•92-367] 

308. Faulkner at Nagano. Edited by Robert A. Jelliffe. Tokyo, 
Kenkyusha Ltd. [1956]. First edition, in dust jacket. [Ex 

3734-92-333] 

Faulkner's participation in the 1955 Nagano Summer Seminar in American Litera- 
ture, at the invitation of the United States Department of State, is recorded in 
Faulkner at Nagano, a collection of speeches, interviews, and the text of seminar 
question-and-answer sessions. 

309. Miscellaneous anthologies of Faulkner's work published in 
England, France, and Norway. 

46 



a. Faulkner's County: Tales of Yoknapatawpha County. London, Chatto & Win. 
dus, 1955. [Ex 3734.92.335] 

b. Jefferson, Mississippi. Une anthologie etablie et presentee par Michel Mohrt. 
[Paris, Le Club du meilleur livre, 195G.] [Ex 373492.353] 

c. Noveller. Oslo, Gyldendal Norsk Forlag, 1951. Translation of fourteen short 
stories into Norwegian by Leo Str0m. [Lent by Random House] 

29. MOVIES AND TELEVISION 

For a period of twenty-five years Faulkner has made occasional 
appearances in Hollywood as a film writer, usually in association 
with producer-director Howard Hawks. "When I need money," 
Faulkner has said, "I write to Howard. When he needs writing he 
writes to me." He deprecates his movie-writing and says that "it 
bears about the same relation to my books as letter-writing" (Sat- 
urday Review, June 25, 1955, p. [24]). 

"The moving picture work of my own which seemed best to 
me," he declared in an interview (The Paris Review, Spring, 1956, 
p. 35), "was done by the actors and the writer throwing the script 
away and inventing the scene in actual rehearsal just before the 
camera turned. If I didn't take, or felt I was capable of taking, mo- 
tion picture work seriously, out of simple honesty to motion pic- 
tures and myself too, I would not have tried. But I know now that 
I will never be a good motion picture writer; so that work will 
never have the urgency for me which my own medium has." 

Faulkner first went to Hollywood after Sanctuary had gained 
him wide public recognition in 1931, and he has had a hand in 
many scripts since then. A partial list includes: Today We Live 
(1933), an adaptation of his own story "Turn About," with Joan 
Crawford and Gary Cooper; The Road to Glory (1936), with 
Fredric March and Lionel Barrymore; The Slave Ship (1937), with 
Wallace Beery; To Have and Have Not (1945), an adaptation of 
the Hemingway novel, with Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall; 
The Big Sleep (1946), also with Bogart and Bacall; and Land of 
the Pharaohs (1955). Faulkner has said that he has done screen 
writing for which he has not received screen credit, and one such 
script is that of The Southerner (1945), with Zachary Scott, ac- 
cording to Scott himself (Memphis Commercial Appeal, May 8, 
1955, Section 6, p. 15). 

310. Photograph of Joan Crawford and Robert Young in Today 
We Live. [Lent by the New York Public Library] 

311. Review of Today We Live by John S. Cohen, Jr. Clipping 
from the New York Sun, April 17, 1933. [Lent by the New 
York Public Library] 

47 



312. Photograph of Joseph Schildkraut in The Slave Ship. [Thea- 
tre Collection] 

313. Script of The Big Sleep, by William Faulkner and Leigh 
Brackett, produced by Howard Hawks. [Lent by the New 
York Public Library] 

314. Movie adaptations of Faulkner works. 

Sanctuary was transformed by Paramount into the film 
The Story of Temple Drake (1933), which starred Miriam 
Hopkins and Jack La Rue. Faulkner himself had a hand in 
the adaptation of his short story "Turn About" into Today 
We Live (1933), and in 1949 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer pro- 
duced Intruder in the Dust, which was filmed in Oxford, 
Mississippi, with many of the townspeople cast in minor 
roles. 

a. Script of The Story of Temple Drake, by Oliver H. P. Garrett and Maurice 
Watkins. [Lent by Paramount Pictures Corporation] 

b. Three stills from The Story of Temple Drake. [Theatre Collection] 

c. Photostat of the review of the premiere of Intruder in the Dust by Elizabeth 
Spencer, the Greenville, Miss., Delta Democrat-Times, October 16, 1949, p. 18. [Lent 
by James B. Meriwether] 

d. List of cast and credits for Intruder in the Dust, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer public- 
ity release sheet, dated August 22, 1949. [Theatre Collection] 

e. Four stills from Intruder in the Dust. [Theatre Collection] 

315. Television adaptations of Faulkner works. 

The adaptation (by Faulkner himself) of the short story 
"The Brooch," televised on the Lux Video Theatre, April 2, 
1953, was the first appearance of a Faulkner work on tele- 
vision. Two Faulkner stories, "Smoke" and "Barn Burning," 
were adapted by Gore Vidal and televised by the Columbia 
Broadcasting System in 1954. The scripts were later published 
in a collection of Vidal's television plays. 

a. Script of "The Brooch." [Lent by Lever Brothers Company] 

b. Three photographs of the filming and production of "The Brooch." [Lent by 
Lever Brothers Company] 

c. Scripts of adaptations of "Smoke" and "Barn Burning," by Gore Vidal. [Lent 
by CBS Television] 

d. Gore Vidal. Visit to a Small Planet and Other Television Plays. Boston, Little, 
Brown and Company [1956]. [3973125.393]. "Smoke," pp. [2i7]-233; "Barn Burning," 

PP- [2351-252- 

e. Script of adaptation of The Sound and the Fury, by Frank W. Durkee, Jr., 
televised by the National Broadcasting Company on December 6, 1955. [Manu- 
scripts Division] 



48 



30. AWARDS AND PUBLIC CAREER 

Since the award of the Nobel Prize for Literature in December, 

1950, William Faulkner has received many additional awards and 
prizes, and has increasingly accepted the responsibilities of being 
a widely known public figure, as well as man of letters. He has 
made speeches, has written articles and letters on current affairs, 
and has made official trips abroad for the United States Depart- 
ment of State. 

316. The Nobel Prize, 1950. 

On December 10, 1950, Faulkner was awarded the 1949 
Nobel Prize for Literature in Stockholm, Sweden. The text 
of his speech of acceptance, as printed in the official record 
of the 1950 Nobel Prize ceremonies the following year, dif- 
fers slightly from the text of the typescript Faulkner supplied 
his publishers, from which were derived most of the versions 
which have appeared in this country. 

a. Les Prix Nobel en 1950. Stockholm, Imprimerie Royale, P. A. Norstedt & Soner, 

1951. [Ex 3734.92.837]. Faulkner's speech of acceptance, pp. 71-72. 

b. " 'I Decline to Accept the End of Man.' " New York Herald Tribune Book 
Review, January 14, 1951, p. 5. [DR. 0901.1981] 

c. The Nobel Prize Speech. [New York, The Spiral Press, 1951.] A copy of the first 
impression inscribed by Faulkner for his editor, Saxe Commins. [Lent by Saxe Com- 
mins; Library copy, Ex 3734.92.3863]. There were three impressions of this pamphlet: 
the first, of 1,500 copies, was ready about March 15; the second, of 2,500 copies, 
about March 25; and the third, of 1,150 copies, about April 10. 

d. The 1949 Nobel Prize for Literature, medal and scroll. [Lent by the Mary 
Buie Museum, Oxford, Mississippi]. The text of the scroll, which is in Swedish, 
may be translated as follows: "The Swedish Academy have, at a meeting on 10 
November 1950, in accordance with the terms of the will of Alfred Nobel, drawn up 
on 27 November 1895, decided to confer upon William Faulkner the 1949 Nobel 
Prize in Literature for his powerful and independent artistic contribution to Amer- 
ica's new fictional literature. Stockholm 10 December 1950." See Fig. 32 

317. Commencement address, University High School, 1951. 

On May 28, 1951, Faulkner delivered the address to the 
graduating class of the University High School, Oxford, Mis- 
sissippi, of which his daughter, Jill, was a member. 

a. Photostat of the address in The Oxford Eagle, May 31, 1951, p. 1. [Original in 
the University of Mississippi Library] 

b. First page of the manuscript of the address. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

318. The Legion of Honor, 1951. 

On October 26, 1951, in New Orleans, Faulkner was made 
an Officer of the Legion of Honor. 

a. Photostat of manuscript copy of his speech of acceptance inscribed by Faulkner 
for Saxe Commins. 13 [Lent by Saxe Commins] 

is Reproduced as an illustration in The Princeton University Library Chronicle, 
XVIII (Spring, 1957), Plate I. 

49 



b. The Legion of Honor, medal and scroll. [Lent by the Mary Buie Museum, Ox- 
ford, Mississippi] 

319. Address to the Delta Council, 1952. 

On May 15, 1952, Faulkner spoke in Cleveland, Mississip- 
pi, at the annual meeting of the Delta Council. The com- 
plete text of his address appeared three days later in Hod- 
ding Carter's Delta Democrat-Times and, later in the same 
month, in pamphlet form. 

a. Photograph of the address in the Greenville, Miss., Delta Democrat-Times, 
May 18, 1952, p. 9. [Lent by James B. Meriwether; from the microfilm on file in the 
office of The Delta Democrat-Times] 

b. An Address Delivered By William Faulkner. . . . [Greenville, Miss., Delta 
Council, 1952.] [Ex 3734-92-31 15] 

320. Commencement address, Pine Manor Junior College, 1953. 

On June 8, 1953, Faulkner delivered the address to the 
graduating class of Pine Manor Junior College, Wellesley, 
Massachusetts. The text of his address as printed in The At- 
lantic differs slightly from that of the mimeographed copies 
distributed by the Pine Manor Alumnae Office after August 
31 and from the shortened version published in the Pine 
Manor Bulletin. 

a. "Faith or Fear." The Atlantic, CXCII (August, 1953), [r>3]-55- [0901.A881] 

b. "William Faulkner Addresses Pine Manor Seniors." Pine Manor Bulletin, I 
(J ul y. 1953). 8-9. [Ex 3734-92] 

c. Mimeographed copy of address. 11 pp. [Lent by Linton R. Massey] 

d. Photograph of Faulkner, with President Alfred T. Hill of Pine Manor con- 
gratulating Miss Jill Faulkner, who was graduated with the highest academic record 
in her class. [Manuscripts Division] 

321. The National Book Award, 1951 and 1955. 

Faulkner has twice won the National Book Award, in 1951 
(for the Collected Stories, 1950) and in 1955 (for A Fable, 

1954)- 

a. ". . . William Faulkner's address on the occasion of his receiving on Jan. 25 
the National Book Award for his novel, 'A Fable.' " The New York Times Book Re- 
view, February 6, 1955, pp. 2, 24. [DR 0901.6741] 

b. Typescript of the address, with manuscript corrections. 3 pp. [Manuscripts 
Division] 

322. Address at the University of Oregon, 1955. 

In April, 1955, Faulkner spoke at the University of Oregon 
on "Freedom American Style." Revised for publication, the 
speech was entitled "On Privacy: The American Dream: 
What Happened to It." 

a. Typescript of the original speech, with manuscript corrections. 17 pp. [Manu- 
scripts Division]. See Fig. 31 

b. "On Privacy." Harper's Magazine, CCXI (July, 1955), [33]"38. [0901. H295] 

50 



c. Typescript of the revised version of speech, as published, with a change of 
title on the first page in Faulkner's hand. 16 pp. [Manuscripts Division] 

323. Address to the Southern Historical Association, 1955. 

On November io, 1955, in Memphis, Tennessee, Faulkner 
was one of three speakers on the topic "The Segregation 
Decisions" at the twenty-first annual meeting of the South- 
ern Historical Association. His address, printed in the Mem- 
phis Commercial Appeal the following morning, was ex- 
panded by three additional paragraphs for inclusion in the 
later pamphlet publication of all three papers read at the 
meeting. 

a. Typescript of the original address. [Lent by James Silver] 

b. Typescript of the three added paragraphs. [Lent by James Silver] 

c. Three Views of the Segregation Decisions [cover title], Atlanta, Southern Re- 
gional Council, 1956. [Ex 3734.92. 3835]. William Faulkner, "American Segregation 
and the World Crisis," pp. 9-12. 

324. The Silver Medal of the Athens Academy, 1957. 

On March 28, 1957, Faulkner received, while in Greece 
on an official visit for the United States Department of State, 
the Silver Medal of the Athens Academy. (The Academy 
annually awards two medals, one of gold and one of silver. 
The Gold Medal was awarded in 1957 to the people of 
Cyprus.) While in Athens, Faulkner attended a gala per- 
formance, on March 30, of the Greek production of his play, 
Requiem for a Nun. 

a. The Silver Medal and scroll of the Athens Academy. [Lent by Mr. Faulkner] 

b. Photograph of Faulkner receiving the medal and scroll from the President 
of the Academy, Panagiotis Poulitsas. [Manuscripts Division] 

c. Press releases, by the United States Information Service in Athens, of the Greek 
and English texts of Faulkner's speech of acceptance, March 28, 1957. [Manuscripts 
Division]. The English text is as follows: 

Mr. President, Gentlemen of the Academy, Ladies and Gentlemen: 
I accept this medal not alone as an American nor as a writer but as one chosen 
by the Greek Academy to represent the principle that man shall be free. 

The human spirit does not obey physical laws. When the sun of Pericles cast 
the shadow of civilized man around the earth, that shadow curved until it 
touched America. So when someone like me comes to Greece he is walking the 
shadow back to the source of the light which cast the shadow. When the 
American comes to this country he has come back to something that was 
familiar. He has come home. He has come back to the cradle of civilized man. 
I am proud that the Greek people have considered me worthy to receive this 
medal. It will be my duty to return to my country and tell my people that the 
qualities in the Greek race — toughness, bravery, independence and pride — are 
too valuable to lose. It is the duty of all men to see that they do not vanish 
from the earth. 

d. Photograph of Faulkner speaking to the Swedish ambassador, Count Stackel- 
berg, during the intermission of Requiem for a Nun. [Manuscripts Division] 

51 



e. 



e. Photograph of Faulkner with the actor-producer Dimitri Myrat and the actress 
Voula Zoumboulaki backstage at the performance of Requiem for a Nun. [Manu- 
scripts Division] 

325. The Howells Medal of the American Academy, 1950. 

In 1950 Faulkner was awarded the Howells Medal by the 
American Academy of Arts and Letters. This medal is 
awarded by the Academy "from time to time for work in 
the art of prose fiction over the five years last preceding." 

a. The Howells Medal. [Lent by the Mary Buie Museum, Oxford, Mississippi] 

b. "Letter of Acknowledgment from William Faulkner." Proceedings of the Ameri- 
can Academy of Arts and Letters and the National Institute of Arts and Letters, 
Second Series, No. 1 (1951), 19. [0911.122] 

326. Other awards. [Lent by the Mary Buie Museum, Oxford, 

Mississippi] 

a. Medal from the city of Verdun, 1951. 

b. Page One Award of the Newspaper Guild of New York, 1951. Awarded for 
Collected Stories, 1950. 

327. Faulkner at Nagano, 1955. 

In August, 1955, Faulkner visited Japan as a participant 
in the Summer Seminar in American Literature at Nagano 
conducted under the auspices of the United States Depart- 
ment of State. 

a. Mimeographed State Department report on the seminar, September 27, 1955. 
[Manuscripts Division] 

b. Scrapbook concerning Faulkner's visit to Japan, compiled by Leon Picon, of the 
United States Information Service. [Lent by Leon Picon]. Through the courtesy 
of Mr. Picon, a microfilm of this scrapbook is available in the Princeton Uni- 
versity Library. [Film 3734-92.856] 

c. To the Youth of Japan. [Tokyo, United States Information Service, August, 
^S-l [Ex 3734.92.392]. A bilingual edition of a message Faulkner wrote August 22, 
1955, for the United States Information Service to use in connection with his visit. 
It was reprinted in several newspapers and in Faulkner at Nagano. (See No. 308.) 

328. Public letters. 

On several occasions Faulkner has addressed letters to the 
editors of newspapers and magazines on current affairs and 
literary issues. 

a. Photostat of letter to the editor of The Oxford Eagle, March 13, 1947, p. 5. 
[Original in the University of Mississippi Library] 

b. Photostat of letter to the editor of The New York Times, December 26, 1954, 
Section IV, p. 6. [0921.6784c] 

c. Letter to Richard Walser, in The Enigma of Thomas Wolfe, ed. Richard Walser, 
Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1953, p. [vii]. [399523.974]. Faulkner has on 
several occasions been quoted as calling Wolfe the greatest contemporary American 
writer. In this letter he corrects the misquotations. "I rated Wolfe first," he wrote 
Walser, "because he had tried the hardest to say the most." 

d. Part of a letter to the Batesville, Mississippi, Chamber of Commerce, quoted 
in the Memphis Commercial Appeal, August 11, 1956, p. 15. [Lent by James B. Meri- 
wether] 

52 



e. Photostat of letter to the editor of the Memphis Commercial Appeal, April 17, 
1955, Section V, p. 3. [Original in the Memphis State College Library]. This is 
the last of a series upon the integration question which Faulkner wrote to the 
Commercial Appeal in the spring of 1955. 

329. The "Beer Broadside." 

In connection with an election on the legalization of the 
sale of beer in Oxford, Faulkner had printed and distributed 
1,500 copies of a broadside which, as he explained in a sub- 
sequent letter to The Oxford Eagle, "was only secondarily 
concerned with beer." His primary purpose, he said, was to 
protest against the action of three Oxford ministers who 
campaigned against the legalization of beer sales — "I object 
to ministers of God violating; the canons and ethics of their 
sacred and holy avocation by using, either openly or under- 
hand, the weight and power of their office to try to influence 
a civil election" (The Oxford Eagle, September 14, 1950). 

"To the Voters of Oxford." Broadside printed in Oxford, Mississippi, about Sep- 
tember 1, 1950. [Lent by James Silver] 

330. "A Letter to the North." 

Faulkner's moderate stand on the segregation question 
has aroused the resentment of extremists on both sides. In 
this article, as Faulkner explained in a letter printed in 
Life three weeks later, he was cautioning the pro-integration 
forces to proceed slowly because of his fear that violence 
would erupt over the Autherine Lucy case at the University 
of Alabama. 

a. "A Letter to the North." Life, March 5, 1956, pp. 51-52. [ogoi.L724q] 

b. Typescript of article, entitled "Letter to a Northern Editor," with manuscript 
corrections. 1 1 pp. [Manuscripts Division]. See Fig. 30 

331. The American Dream. 

At Nagano in 1955, Faulkner read, in a seminar, the manu- 
script of an unpublished essay which he said would even- 
tually be a chapter in a book which he planned to call The 
American Dream. Apparently the essay was that which ap- 
peared, entitled "On Fear: The South in Labor," the fol- 
lowing summer, and it would seem that the article "On 
Privacy: The American Dream: What Happened to It" (see 
No. 322), published shortly before the Nagano Seminar, 
is also designed for a Chapter in the book of essays. 

a. Faulkner at Nagano, Tokyo, Kenkyusha Ltd. [1956], opened to pp. 96-97, with 
a reference to The American Dream. [Ex 3734.92.333] 

b. Typescript of "On Fear: The South in Labor," with manuscript corrections. 
17 pp. [Manuscripts Division] 

c. "On Fear: The South in Labor." Harper's Magazine, CCXII (June, 1956), 
[29]-34- [0901. H295] 

53 



31. PHOTOGRAPHS OF WILLIAM FAULKNER 

332. As the author of Light in August (1932). [Lent by Carvel 
Collins] 

333. Four photographs of Faulkner at his home in Oxford (about 
1950). [Lent by Carvel Collins] 

334. By Sabine Weiss (1954?). [Manuscripts Division] 

335. By Carl Van Vechten (1954). [Manuscripts Division] 

(For other photographs and representations of Faulkner, see 
Nos. 1, 15, 16, 320-d, 324-b, 324-d, and 324-e.) 



54 



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10. T/ze Sound and the Fury 

Page 34 of manuscript 

(Catalogue No. 42) 



-SV-7& ' 

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77*e Sound and the Fury 
Page 70 of manuscript 
(Catalogue No. 42) 






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12. Sanctuary 
Page 131 of manuscript (Catalogue No. 57 ) 




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13. Pylon 

Unnumbered page of manuscript 

(Catalogue No. 121) 




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15. "Barn Burning" 

Pa ge 1 of manuscript 

(Catalogue No. 160) 



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18. "Father Abraham" 

Page 2 of manuscript 

(Catalogue No. 259) 



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21. "Fool About a Horse" 

Page i of manuscript 

(Catalogue No. 269) 



(.si 10 c\ts) 



STEVENS 

(follows lliVmgh (lie door)/ 
Qfcourse we are. Hasn't He been\elling us thai 

f 'T ""II 1 " "" "'" iIl "II nl'lll >f«H ■■'"-- 




Ho CTiit s, The door closes in, clashes, the clash and clam 
of the key as the Jailor locks it again; the three pairsl of 
footsteps sound and begin to lade in the outer corr/dor. 



Gutt*«i 



BEARER 



BEARER 



R H A R-£~R~~^^W 



B E A R E 



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22. Requiem for a Nun 

Galley proof of final scene with manuscript additions 

(Catalogue No. 222-d) 



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23. "Mule in the Yard" 

First page of manuscript 

(Catalogue No. 296-a) 



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33- Two views of the Faulkner exhibition in the 
Princeton University Library 



PART TWO 
THE MANUSCRIPTS 



Introduction 



I. BOOKS 



A. PUBLISHED 



Soldiers' Pay, 1926 
Mosquitoes, 1927 
Sartoris, 1929 
The Sound and the 
Fury, 1929 

5. As I Lay Dying, 1930 

6. Sanctuary, 1931 

7. Light in August, 1932 

8. Pylon, 1935 

9. Absalom, Absalom! 

193 6 

10. The Unvanquished, 

1938 

11. The Wild Palms, 1939 



12. 

13- 
14. 

15- 
16. 

18. 
*9- 



The Hamlet, 1940 

Go Down, Moses, 1942 

Intruder in the Dust, 

1948 

Knight's Gambit, 1949 

Requiem for a Nun, 

195 1 

^4 Fable, 1954 
.Big IToods, 1955 
T/ze Town, 1957 



B. UNPUBLISHED 

1. "Elmer" 

2. "The Devil Beats His 
Wife" [?] 



II. SHORT STORIES 



A. PUBLISHED 



1 


"Ad Astra" 


17- 


'Leg" 


2 


"All the Dead Pilots" 


18. 


'Miss Zilphia Gant" 


3 


"Artist at Home" 


1 9- 


'Mistral" 


4 


"Beyond" 


20. 


'Mountain Victory" 


5 


"Black Music" 


21. 


'My Grandmother Mil- 


6 


"The Brooch" 


" 


lard" 


7 


"Carcassonne" 


22. 


'Pennsylvania Station" 


8 


"A Courtship" 


23- 


'Red Leaves" 




["Crevasse" see "Vic- 


24. 


'A Rose for Emily" 




tory"] 


25- 


'Shall Not Perish" 


9 


"Death Drag" 


26. 


'Shingles for the Lord" 


10 


"Divorce in Naples" 


27. 


'That Evening Sun" 


1 1 


"Doctor Martino" 


28. 


'The Tall Men'\ 


12 


"Dry September" 


29- 


'There Was a Queen" 


13 


. "Elly" 


30. 


'Thrift" 


14 


"Foxhunt" 


3 1 - 


'Turnabout" 


15 


"Idyll in the Desert" 


32- 


'Victory" 


16 


. "A Justice" 







57 



note: The following published stories were incorporated by Faulkner into 
books, and are to be found with the manuscripts listed in section IA: 

"Barn Burning" [The Hamlet] 
"Delta Autumn" [Go Down, Moses] 
"An Error in Chemistry" [Knight's Gambit] 
"Fool about a Horse" [The Hamlet] 
"Go Down, Moses" [Go Down, Moses] 
"Gold Is Not Always" [Go Down, Moses] 
"Hand upon the Waters" [Knight's Gambit] 
"Monk" [Knight's Gambit] 
"Mule in the Yard" [The Town] 
"The Old People" [Go Down, Moses] 
"Pantaloon in Black" [Go Down, Moses] 
"Point of Law" [Go Down, Moses] 
"Smoke" [Knight's Gambit] 
"Tomorrow" [Knight's Gambit] 



B. UNPUBLISHED 

i. "Adolescence" 

:. "The Big Shot" 

;. "Love" 

(.. "Moonlight" 

;. "Rose of Lebanon" 



6. "Snow" 

7. "The Wishing-Tree" 

8. "With Caution and Dis- 
patch" 

9. [untitled] 



note: The following unpublished short stories were incorporated by Faulkner 
into published books, and are to be found with the manuscripts listed in 
section IA: 

"An Absolution" [Go Down, Moses] 

"The Fire on the Hearth" [Go Down, Moses] 

"Knight's Gambit" [Knight's Gambit] 

"An Odor of Verbena" [The Unvanquished] 

"Was" [Go Down, Moses] 



III. VERSE 

IV. WRITING FOR MOVIES AND TELEVISION 

V. MISCELLANEOUS 



58 



INTRODUCTION 

Comprising more than 1500 pages of manuscript and 9700 pages 
of typescript, the papers which William Faulkner deposited in 
the Princeton University Library in March 1957 constitute by 
far the largest collection of Faulkner manuscript material yet 
known or made available for examination. Indeed, it appears 
highly unlikely that sufficient material now exists, outside insti- 
tutional libraries, to make up half so large a collection. 1 It includes 
complete or nearly complete manuscript versions of five of the 
novels: Sartoris, The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Sanctu- 

1 In June 1959 this collection was transferred to the Alderman Library of the 
University of Virginia, where it is now on deposit. The second largest such col- 
lection is that of the University of Texas Library. (See James B. Meriwether, 
William Faulkner: An Exhibition of Manuscripts, [Austin:] The Research Center 
of the University of Texas, 1959.) There are important manuscripts in several 
private collections, and in the New York Public Library and the libraries of 
Princeton and Yale universities. Up to the present time, little published use has 
been made of this material by literary scholars. Russell Roth, in "The Brennan 
Papers: Faulkner in Manuscript," Perspective, II (Summer 1949), pp. 219-224, 
presents some interesting information about Faulkner's working methods, and 
about drafts of two sections of Go Down, Moses. (Corroborative information about 
Faulkner's writing methods at an earlier period appears in an interview with 
Henry Nash Smith, in the Dallas Morning News, February 14, 1932, Section IV, 
p. 2.) Norman Holmes Pearson, in "Faulkner's Three 'Evening Suns,' " The Yale 
University Library Gazette, XXIX (October 1954), pp. 61-70, draws on manu- 
scripts at Yale in presenting a model demonstration of the literary significance 
of manuscript material. But as yet we have had no full scale study of Faulkner's 
art, or even of any of the longer works, based upon manuscript evidence, though 
the depth and complexity of Faulkner's writing, as Professor Pearson shows in his 
article, can render such studies more than ordinarily fruitful. 

In the absence or unavailability, for the purpose of such studies, of complete 
or nearly complete unpublished versions of Faulkner's works, it may be worth- 
while to note here the scattered pages of manuscript which have been published 
as illustrations in various places. (An excellent example of the value of what can 
be done with such material is George P. Garrett, "Some Revisions in As I Lay 
Dying," Modern Language Notes, LXXIII, pp. 414-417.) A page of the manuscript 
of Pylon was reproduced in the limited, signed issue of that novel in 1935. The 
first page of the manuscript of Absalom, Absalom! appears as an illustration in 
The Book Collector, IV (Winter 1955), facing p. 279, and the first page of the 
manuscript of As I Lay Dying appears in The Paris Review, IV (Spring 1956), 
pp. [32-33]. In the studies cited above, Professor Pearson reproduces a page from 
a manuscript of the story "That Evening Sun" and quotes from other pages, and 
Russell Roth quotes from typescript drafts of two sections of Go Down, Moses. 
The first page of the typescript setting copy of The Mansion appears as an illus- 
tration in the leaflet distributed at the Faulkner exhibition held at the University 
of Virginia (October 1959-January 1960). Reproductions of manuscripts, type- 
scripts, and corrected galley proof appear in the Texas exhibition catalogue cited 
above, and in The Princeton University Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring 1957), 
as well as in the present volume. 

59 



ary, and Light in August. There are substantially complete type- 
script versions, bound up by Faulkner himself, of Soldiers' Pay, 
Mosquitoes, Sartoris, The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, 
and Sanctuary, and there are unbound typescript versions of all 
the rest of his novels except Light in August (about a tenth 
missing), The Unvanquished (six of seven chapters missing), and 
Go Down, Moses (one chapter missing). There are manuscripts 
or typescripts, sometimes both, for more than thirty of Faulkner's 
published short stories, and eight unpublished. Verse, both pub- 
lished and unpublished, is similarly represented. The collection 
is rounded out by tearsheets from periodical printings of his short 
stories, and by proofsheets and other material relating to the 
printing of his books, particularly the later ones, including front 
matter, dead matter, layouts, and sample pages. (A certain num- 
ber of letters and personal papers, while included in the col- 
lection which Faulkner had preserved and deposited at Prince- 
ton, are omitted from this handlist, since they pertain less to 
his literary career than to his private life.) 

Though this collection is unusually rich in the possession of 
multiple versions of many pages and passages from several of the 
novels, and contains two or more versions of many of the novels 
and stories complete, it contains practically nothing that could 
be called a rough draft or a worksheet. Apparently Faulkner took 
pains to save only finished work. 2 The gaps in the manuscript 
holdings also invite speculation. Where is the manuscript of 
Pylon, for instance? Faulkner kept only one page. There is an- 
other at Texas, and in the University of Mississippi Library is 
p. 1, which he presented to a friend shortly after the novel was 
published. Will the rest of it turn up? What about the manu- 
script of The Wild Palms} Not enough of it is preserved among 
Faulkner's papers to answer the question of the extent to which 
the two plots were developed simultaneously. What about manu- 
script versions of Soldiers' Pay and Mosquitoes} There are no 
manuscript pages from either in the collection. Did Faulkner 

2 That Faulkner used extensive working notes on one occasion is proved by 
the reproduction in Life, XXXVII (August 9, 1954), pp. [77]-y8, of the notes for 
A Fable he recorded on the wall of his study. At the Summer Seminar in Amer- 
ican Literature at Nagano, in 1955, when questioned about his practice, Faulkner 
replied "... I have never kept notes. There have been times when I have made 
notes. . . . Then when I used those notes, I threw the notes away." (Faulkner 
at Nagano, ed. Robert A. Jelliffe, Tokyo: Kenkyusha, 1956, p. 102.) Two examples 
of worksheets in the exhibition, a note on a paraphrase of Eliot in Requiem for 
a Nun and a list of characters, and their ages, for The Town, were both preserved 
by his editor, not by Faulkner. (See items 223 and 293 of the Catalogue.) 

60 



begin them at the typewriter, as he seems to have done, as a rule, 
with his later books? From Sartoris to The Hamlet the collection 
affords ample manuscript evidence to support Henry Nash Smith's 
statement (in the interview cited above) that Faulkner habitually 
wrote first in ink, revising as he went along, and not using the 
typewriter until he was ready to prepare a final typescript for 
the publisher. He kept only a single typescript version of Soldiers' 
Pay and Mosquitoes; did he throw away earlier manuscript or 
typescript drafts? 

Despite the immense interest which these papers have for the 
student of Faulkner's work, it should be said that they make 
no startling changes in the picture of Faulkner the writer which 
emerges from a close examination of his published writings. 
The great lesson which the collection as a whole provides is a 
better understanding of the quality of Faulkner's dedication to 
his craft. The writing of nearly every work represented in this 
collection, it is apparent, was characterized by the most rigid 
discipline, a discipline made equally evident at every stage in 
the writing, from revision involving the rearrangement of whole 
chapters in a novel to the almost endless process of minor stylistic 
polishing. But this lesson has already been taught, though not 
on so large a scale, by the publication of many of Faulkner's 
stories in several versions, which made obvious their author's 
concern with both major revision and minor polishing in the 
changes that took place between periodical and book publica- 
tion. 

The many changes that appear as the manuscript and type- 
script drafts in this collection are collated with the published 
texts seldom reveal radical shifts of emphasis and intention, but 
they often indicate substantial changes in the means Faulkner 
employed to work out those intentions. An example is the four- 
teen page typescript draft of the title story of Go Down, Moses. 
In the published book (p. 369) a character identifies himself to 
the census taker as Samuel Worsham Beauchamp; on the first 
page of the typescript, he appears as Henry Coldfield Sutpen. 
The decision not to involve Go Down, Moses so closely as this 
with the characters and meaning of Absalom, Absalom! is signifi- 
cant, and helps emphasize the difference in the treatment of the 
theme of miscegenation in the two works, though the earlier 
intention of connecting them more closely has its advantages too. 

A more important change is evident in the process of writing 
The Hamlet which the manuscript reveals. At one time Faulk- 

61 



ner planned to use as the opening chapter of the novel the epi- 
sode which was published separately as the short story "Barn 
Burning." Though a shortened version of the episode is incor- 
porated later on in the published book, it eliminates the signifi- 
cant figure of Colonel Sartoris Snopes. Structurally, we can guess 
that the decision to abandon "Barn Burning" and consequently 
to begin the book with what was originally planned as chapter 
two was made to tighten the novel, though "Barn Burning" as 
a prologue would be appropriate to the episodic structure of the 
book. However, the abandoning of Colonel Sartoris Snopes as a 
character represents an important change in the means that 
Faulkner chose to work out the themes of his novel, and a change 
that took place when much of the first part of the book had 
already been decided upon and written down in something not 
too far from its final form. 

Nevertheless it would be a mistake, I believe, to assume too 
hastily from such an instance that the sort of changes in authorial 
tactics and strategy represented by what happened to "Barn Burn- 
ing" reveal either radical shifts of intention, or the abandoning 
of a completed design for a book. Still less does it indicate, I 
think, that Faulkner was approaching the writing of the book 
without such a design, though Faulkner has often said, obviously 
with enjoyment, that sometimes he doesn't know what he plans 
to say when he sits down to write, or that he sometimes doesn't 
know how a book will end when he begins it. Plainly such a 
statement, like so many of the parables in which Faulkner de- 
lights to speak to a world that so often invades his privacy, has 
a germ of truth in it, but also a trap for the unwary. Obviously 
at some point in the conception of any book the author doesn't 
know how it will end. One is tempted to guess that Faulkner's 
imagination can hold a work's general design, or its basic elements, 
the characters and their relationships, firmly in control, allowing 
the author to leave to the inspiration of the actual writing much 
of the working out of these themes and the creation of the action 
that would reveal them. 

The method followed in the description of these papers should 
be self-explanatory. Only in the case of titles have I made any 
change in quoting from them; there Faulkner's habit of putting 
titles in block capitals, perhaps underscored several times, did 
not seem to require more precise transcription for the purposes 
of this listing. In general, the descriptions are more elaborate 

62 



for those items, generally manuscripts, which seemed to pose the 
greatest problems in identification, or in establishing the relation- 
ship of one version to another. 

This handlist of the Faulkner papers by no means pretends 
to deal with them in final fashion. I have assumed that the first 
duty of such a handlist is to identify everything in the collection, 
and to describe it in sufficient detail to establish, where practi- 
cable, the relationship between the different versions of the 
same works which are included. On the whole, I feel that this 
goal has been achieved with reasonable success. But a more defin- 
itive account would certainly indicate in much greater detail 
the relationship between different versions of the same work, 
would identify more precisely the partial versions and brief 
passages which are merely listed here, and would concern itself 
with the difficult question of dates. Ink, watermarks, and changes 
in Faulkner's hand may supply clues toward solving these ques- 
tions, and as other Faulkner manuscripts become available for 
study, many difficulties should be resolved. Another problem that 
needs to be examined more carefully than I have done is that 
of distinguishing precisely between ribbon copies, carbons, and 
typescripts produced by processes such as hectographing. But these 
appear to be tasks more properly belonging to a later time, or to 
extended studies of individual works or groups of works rather 
than of the whole collection. 

I. BOOKS 

A. PUBLISHED 

i. Soldiers' Pay (1926) 

Bound typescript, 476 pp. Many manuscript corrections. 
There are 474 pages of text, numbered 1 through 473, the 
number 440 being given to two consecutive pages. The text 
is preceded by two unnumbered pages: a title page and a page 
with the epigraph. These pages of the text are not numbered: 

[38], [57]' [59]' [H'.t^ 1 ]. [ l8 3]> [239]- At least one P a g e 
shows evidence of having been typed with a carbon. On p. 473 
is this manuscript note: "New Orleans / May ig25". 3 

There are many textual differences between this corrected 
typescript and the published book. 

3 For a reproduction of p. 151 of this typescript, see Fig. 5. 

63 



2. Mosquitoes (1927) 

Bound typescript, 464 pp. Many manuscript corrections. 
There are 461 pages of text, numbered 2 through 464, the 
numbers 93 and 313 being omitted though the text is com- 
plete. The first page of the text is preceded by three unnum- 
bered pages: a title page; a page with the dedication "To 
Helen, Beautiful and Wise"; and a page with the epigraphic 
description of mosquitoes. On p. 464 is this manuscript note: 
"Pascagoula, Miss / 1 Sept 1926".* 

There are many textual differences between this corrected 
typescript and the published book. 

3. Sartoris (1929) 

a. Manuscript, 237 pp. Despite gaps and duplications in the 
pagination, the text is continuous and appears to be com- 
plete. It is numbered as follows: 01 [the zero is crossed 
out], 02, 002, 003, 03, 04, 05, 1 through 30, 30 through 42 
[the number 30 is given to two consecutive pages], 42a, 
42b, 42c, 43 through 52, 52a, 52b, 52c, 52d, 52c, 53-131, 
133, 132 through 163, 163a, 164 through 219. The title 
"Flags in the Dust" appears at the top of the first page. 5 

This manuscript precedes the typescript described be- 
low, and there are many differences between the two 
versions. 

b. Bound carbon typescript, 594 pp. Many manuscript cor- 
rections, including a few in a hand not Faulkner's. Despite 
gaps and duplications in the pagination, this typescript is 
complete. There are 592 pages of text, preceded by an 
unnumbered title page; the final page of the text is also 
unnumbered, and one page (the first p. 513) should have 
been omitted when the typescript was bound, as it is an 
earlier version of parts of two pages (the first p. 512 and 
the second p. 490) of the complete typescript. The text is 
numbered as follows: 1 through 31, 31a, 32 through 105, 
107 through 201, 212 through 265 [the number 221 is 
given to two pages], 270 through 280, 282 through 513 
[p. 513 is superseded by pp. 512 and 490, the pages which 
precede and follow it], 490 through 582, final page un- 

4 For a reproduction of p. 336 of this typescript, see Fig. 6, and for a note on 
this page, see Catalogue item 20. 

5 For a reproduction of the first page of this manuscript, see Fig. g, and for 
a note on this page, see Catalogue item 2g. 

64 



numbered. The title Flags in the Dust appears on the 
title page, and on p. 7. On the last page of the text is this 
manuscript note: "Oxford, Miss / 29 September ig27". 6 
This corrected typescript is approximately a fourth 
longer than the published novel Sartoris, and there are 
many differences between the text of the book and the 
corresponding portions of the typescript. 

4. The Sound and the Fury (1929) 

a. Manuscript, 148 pp. One page (p. 5) is missing; this ver- 
sion is otherwise complete, despite a gap in the pagination. 
The pages are numbered as follows: 1, 1a, 2, 2b, 3, 4, 6 
through 15, 17 through 148. The first two pages appear to 
have been recently copied by Faulkner, presumably from 
the original first page, which is missing. 7 

This manuscript precedes the typescript described be- 
low, and there are many differences between the two 
versions. 

b. Bound carbon typescript, 409 pp. Many manuscript cor- 
rections. Despite gaps and duplications in the pagination, 
the text is continuous and complete. The text, preceded 
by an unnumbered title page, is numbered as follows: 
1 through 15, 15a, 15b, 15c, i5d, 17 through 57, 57a, 58 
through 61, 61a, 62 through 65, 65a, 66, 67, 67a, 68 
through 91, 91a, gib, 92 through 95, 95a, 96 through 101, 
101a, 102 through 116, 116a, 117 through 133, 133a, 134 
through 157, 157a, 158 through 201 [the number 178 is 
given to two pages], 201a, 202 through 337, 339, 337, 340, 
341 through 392. On p. 392 is this manuscript note: "New 
York, N.Y. / October 1928". 

There are many textual differences between this carbon 
typescript and the published book. 

5. As I Lay Dying (1930) 

a. Manuscript, 107 pp. The pagination is continuous from 
1 through 107. Some pages consist of partial leaves pasted 
together, or of whole sheets with inserts pasted on them. 
At the top of p. 1 is this note: "25 October 1929"; at the 

6 For a reproduction of p. 398 of this typescript, see Fig. 8. 

t For reproductions of pp. 34 and 70 of this manuscript, see Figs. 10 and 11; 
for a reproduction of p. 148, see The Princeton University Library Chronicle, XVIII 
(Spring t957), Plate III. 

65 



bottom of p. 107, "Oxford, Miss. / 11 December, 1929". 8 
This manuscript precedes the carbon typescript de- 
scribed below, and there are many differences between the 

two versions, 
b. Bound carbon typescript, 266 pp. An unnumbered title 

page precedes the text, which is numbered 1 through 265. 

On p. 265 is this manuscript note: "Oxford, Missippi 

[sic] I January 12, 1930". 

There are many textual differences between this carbon 

typescript and the published book. 

6. Sanctuary (1931) 

a. Manuscript, 138 pp. Despite a gap in the numbering, the 
text is complete. The pages are numbered as follows: 1 
through 8, 8a, 9 through 33, 33a, 34 through 69, 71 
through 137. 9 Some pages consist of partial leaves pasted 
together, or of whole sheets with inserts pasted on them. 
On the front cover of the manila folder enclosing the 
manuscript is this note in Faulkner's hand: "Sanctuary. / 
January, 1929 May, 1929". 

This manuscript precedes the carbon typescript de- 
scribed below, and there are many differences between 
the two versions. 

b. Bound carbon typescript, 359 pp. A few manuscript cor- 
rections. An unnumbered title page precedes the text, 
which is numbered 1 through 358. On the title page is the 
following manuscript note: "Oxford, Miss. / January — 
May, 1929". On p. 358 is the following manuscript note: 
"Oxford, Miss. / 25 May, 1929". 

There are many differences between this carbon type- 
script and the galleys of the unpublished first version of 
Sanctuary, which was itself extensively rewritten before 
publication. 

7. Light in August (1932) 

a. Manuscript, 188 pp. The text is continuous and complete, 
despite a duplication in the numbering. There is an un- 

8 For a reproduction of p. 107 of this manuscript, see The Princeton University 
Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring 1957), Plate V; for a reproduction of p. 1, see 
The Paris Review, IV (Spring 1956), pp. [32-33]. 

9 For a reproduction of p. 1 of this manuscript, see The Princeton University 
Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring 1957), Plate IV; for a reproduction of p. 131, see 
Fig. 12; for a note on these two pages, see Catalogue item 57. 

66 



numbered title page, with the title "Dark House" crossed 
out and "Light in August" written above it; below it is 
written "Oxford, Mississippi / 17 August, 1931". The 
pages of the text are numbered as follows: 2, 3, 3 through 
187. At the bottom of the final page is "Oxford, Miss. / 19 
Feb. 1932". 

This manuscript precedes the typescript described be- 
low, and there are many differences between the text of 
the two versions, 
b. Typescript setting copy, 468 pp. Some manuscript cor- 
rections. The text is incomplete, the last page (p. 470) 
ending with the words "so humorless, that" which appear 
in the first paragraph of p. 428 of the published book, and 
p. 469 being missing. The text is preceded by a title page 
bearing the pencilled number i, apparently not in Faulk- 
ner's hand; the text is numbered as follows: 2 through 
121, 122 and 123 [one page, marked with both numbers], 
124 through 468, 470 [a page missing between 468 and 
470]. 

8. Pylon (1935) 

a. Manuscript, 1 page. This page is unnumbered, but repre- 
sents an early version of passages which appear on pp. 9, 
10, and 27 of the published book. 10 

b. Typescript setting copy, 344 pages. The text, numbered 
1 through 344, is complete, though some numbers, and a 
few words of the text, have been lost through damage to 
edges and corners of the pages. 

9. Absalom, Absalom! (1936) 

a. Manuscript, 2 pp. These two unnumbered pages are a 
version of the Chronology which appears on pp. 380-381 
of the published book. 

b. Typescript, 17 pages. Manuscript corrections and annota- 
tions by Faulkner and his editor. The following are the 
page numbers: 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 23, 
24, 25, 31, 32. These pages, all from a version of the first 
chapter of the book, are consecutive where the pagination 
is, and show breaks where the pagination does. 11 

10 For a reproduction of this page of the manuscript, see Fig. 13. 

11 For reproductions of pp. 9 and 13 of this typescript, see Fig. 14. 

67 



This version of these portions of the first chapter pre- 
cedes the final version represented by the corrected type- 
script setting copy described below, and there are a num- 
ber of minor differences between them. 

c. Typescript setting copy, 463 pp. Many manuscript cor- 
rections. The text is complete, and has been consecutively 
repaginated by machine, 1 through 463. The original 
numbering is from 1 through 464, with pages 32 and 344 
omitted, and 12a inserted between 11 and 12. 

d. Limited edition certificate of issue statements, 35 leaves. 
These are extra or discarded leaves, intended to be signed 
and numbered by the author and tipped into the limited 
issue of the novel. Ten are signed or inscribed, one is 
numbered but not signed. 

10. The Unvanquished (1938) 

a. Manuscript, 23 pp. This is a complete version of the final 
chapter of the book, "An Odor of Verbena." The pages 
are numbered 1 through 23. 

This version precedes the typescript described below, 
and there are many differences between them. 

b. Typescript, 54 pp. Manuscript corrections. This is a com- 
plete version of the final chapter, "An Odor of Verbena." 
The pages are numbered as follows: 1 through 10, 10a, 
10b, 10c, 11, 12, 13, 13a, 14 through 50. 

There are slight differences between this typescript and 
the text of the published book. 

11. The Wild Palms (1939) 

a. Manuscript of "Wild Palms," 3 pp. These three unnum- 
bered pages are versions of passages that occur in two 
chapters of this section of the book, its main plot. Two of 
them are the last two pages of a version of the first chapter 
of the novel (corresponding to pp. 20-22 of the published 
book). The third is a version of the ending of the penulti- 
mate chapter of "Wild Palms" (corresponding to pp. 227- 
228 of the published book). 

There are many differences between the text of these 
three pages and the corresponding passages in the pub- 
lished book. 

b. Manuscript of "Old Man," 16 pp. These pages are from 

68 



versions of passages that occur in two chapters of this sec- 
tion of the book, its subplot, and are numbered as follows: 
92, 96, 96, 96, 97, 97, 101, ioi, 102, 103, 103, 104, 142, 
*43> 1 43> *44- The first eleven of these pages represent 
several versions of passages that occur in the third chapter 
of "Old Man" (pp. 143-177 of the published book). The 
final four pages represent versions of the first part of this 
section's penultimate chapter (pp. 229-236 of the pub- 
lished book). 

There are many differences between the text of these 
pages and the corresponding passages in the published 
book, 
c. Typescript setting copy, 384 pp., plus 5 pp. front matter. 
Many manuscript corrections. The text is complete, and 
comprises 383 pages, numbered from 1 through 377, with 
the following six additional pages inserted: 22a, 71a, 89a, 
355a, 358a, 362a. There is an unnumbered title page 
bearing the cancelled title "If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem," 
typed in block capitals, with the published title pencilled 
in. 12 The entire setting copy has been repaginated by ma- 
chine, numbered from 1 through 389, with the five pages 
of front matter following the last page of the text. 

12. The Hamlet (1940) 

a. "Abraham's Children," typescript, 3 pp. These pages 
(numbered 18, ig, and 29) are from early versions of the 
episode of the Texas ponies which occurs in Book Four, 
Chapter One, of The Hamlet. P. 29 appears to be an 
earlier version of the material on p. 19, which is con- 
tinuous with p. 18. 13 

b. "Fool about a Horse" 

(1) Manuscript, 10 pp. This is a complete version, the 
pages numbered from 1 through 10, of the short story 
which was incorporated into Chapter Two, part two, 
of Book One of The Hamlet. 14, 

(2) Typescript, 21 pp. Manuscript corrections. This is 

12 For a note on this cancelled title, see Catalogue item 151. 

13 See item 259 of the Catalogue for a more detailed discussion of the relation- 
ship of "Abraham's Children" to "Spotted Horses" and The Hamlet. See Fig. 19 
for a reproduction of p. 18 of the typescript of "Abraham's Children," and item 
261 of the Catalogue for a note on it. 

14 See Fig. 21 for a reproduction of p. 1 of this manuscript. 

69 



a later but incomplete version of the above manu- 
script, the pages numbered 2 through 19, 23, 28, 29. 15 
(3) Carbon typescript, 33 pp. Manuscript corrections. 
This is a carbon of the above typescript, but com- 
plete, and with more, and different, manuscript cor- 
rections. The pages are numbered 1 through 33. 16 

c. "Barn Burning" 

(1) Manuscript, 17 pp. This complete version of the 
published short story bears on its first page the book 
and chapter headings that indicate its original posi- 
tion as the opening chapter of the novel. The pages 
are numbered 1 through 17. 17 

(2) Typescript, 32 pp. This typescript version, the pages 
numbered from 1 through 32, follows the manuscript 
above. There are minor differences between it and 
the published short story text in Harper's, CLXXIX 
(June 1939). 

(3) Carbon typescript, 32 pp. A carbon of the above 
typescript. 

d. Manuscript, 210 pp. This is a practically complete ver- 
sion of the first six and two-thirds chapters of the pub- 
lished novel. Despite gaps and duplications in the pagina- 
tion and differences in the chapter numbers and book 
titles, the text is continuous, with one minor exception. 

Chapter one, 18 pages, numbered 1 through 18. Chap- 
ter two, 20 pages, numbered 19 through 22, 22a, 22b, 23 
through 36. Chapter three, 33 pages, numbered 37 through 
40, 40, 41, 41, 42, 43, 44, 44a, 44b, 45 through 55, 
55 [the a of 55a is cancelled], 56 through 63, 63a. Chap- 
ter four [Book Two, Chapter One of the published novel], 
28 pages, numbered 35 [this page bears two numbers, 
35 and 64, both of them cancelled] through 58, 87 
through 90 [pages 58 and 87 are not exactly continuous, 
but are nearly so; p. 58 also bears the cancelled number 87, 
and p. 87 also bears the cancelled number 86]. Chapter five 
[Book Two, Chapter Two of the published novel], 25 
pages, numbered 90a, gob, 90c, god, 91, 91a, 92 through 
104, 104a, 104b, 104a, 104b, 104c, i04d. 

is See Fig. 20 for a reproduction of p. 23 of this typescript, and item 273 of 
the Catalogue for a note on p. 8. 

16 See items 269 and 272 of the Catalogue for notes on this carbon typescript. 

17 See Fig. 15 for a reproduction of p. 1 of this manuscript. 

70 



The following chapter should be number six, by this 
system. Instead, its first page is marked Book Three, Chap- 
ter One, with the cancelled title "The Peasants," and 
cancelled headings for Book Two, Chapter Seven, and 
Chapter Five. Corresponding to the first part of the first 
chapter of Book Three of the published novel, it has 
46 pages, numbered 105 through 114, 114a, 115 through 
120, 120a, 120b, 121 through 131, 131a, 132 through 146. 
The following chapter, marked Chapter Two, has 40 
pages, numbered 147 through 167, 168 [this page is num- 
bered 168-169, and the text is continuous with pp. 167 
and 170], 170 through 187. This chapter completes the 
text of the manuscript through the first section of Book 
Three, Chapter Two of the published novel. 18 

e. Manuscript, 87 pp. These are miscellaneous pages, many 
of them continuous, from what appear to be a number 
of versions of material from the above manuscript. Most 
of the pages, if not all of them, appear to precede those 
pages of the above manuscript which include the same 
material. They are numbered as follows: 21, 21a, 35, 
36, 41, 52, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 112, 113, 113, 113, 113, 
113, 114, 114, 114, 114, 115, 115, 116, 116, 117, 117, 118, 
118, 119, 119, 120, 122, 123, 124, 124, 124, 125, 125, 125, 
125, 125, 126, 126, 127, 127, 128, 128, 129, 129, 130, 
130, 130, 131, 131, 131, 131, 131, 131, 131, 132, 132, 

1 S 2 ' l 33> 1 34> 1 34' 135. i3 6 » x 40, i4 8 > M 8 * M 8 , 148, 
148, 149, 149, 149, 149, 149, 150, 150, 151, 159, 161, 
163, 164. 

f. Typescript, 18 pp. These are versions of five passages in 
the published novel. The first is from the first chapter 
of Book Three, and occurs in two versions, each con- 
sisting of two consecutive pages numbered 316 and 317. 
The first of these bears at the top of both pages the job 
number 44283, stamped by machine. The second pair 
bears the same job number, and also the setting copy 
numbers 330 and 331. Both pairs have been cancelled, the 
first in red pencil, the second in black, and appear to 
have been part of the complete typescript copy described 
below, the first pair representing the original version, the 

is See items 162 and 280 of the Catalogue for notes on pp. 58 and 31 of this 
manuscript. For a reproduction of p. i, see The Princeton University Library 
Chronicle, XVIII (Spring 1957), Plate VI. 

71 



second a revision which was itself replaced by the final 
version in the setting copy. 19 

The second passage is the beginning of the second part 
of the second chapter of Book Three of the published 
novel, and is represented by a single page, unnumbered 
but with the numeral 2 of the chapter section heading 
at the top. 

The third passage, from the second part of Book One, 
Chapter Two of the published novel, consists of four 
consecutive pages, with a carbon of the fourth. The first 
three pages are all numbered 40; the fourth page and 
its carbon are unnumbered. 

The fourth passage, from the second section of Book 
Three, Chapter One of the published novel, consists of 
six pages, the text consecutive despite the gaps in number- 
ing: 266, 268, 269, 270, 272, 274. 

The fifth passage is in the first section of Chapter One 
of Book Four of the published novel, and is represented 
by two pages, each a version of p. 487 in the final setting 
copy. The first, the earlier of the two versions, bears the 
job number 44283, stamped by machine. This page has 
been cancelled in red pencil. The second version, can- 
celled in black pencil, bears the same job number, and 
the setting copy page number 508, stamped by machine. 
(The third and final version of this page, in the setting 
copy described below, bears the same page and job num- 
bers, 508 44283.) 
g. Typescript setting copy, 604 pp., plus 8 pp. front matter. 
Many manuscript corrections. Despite gaps and repetitions 
in the pagination, the text is continuous, and complete. 
The pages have been renumbered by machine; the orig- 
inal numbering is as follows: 1 through 9, 9a, 10 through 
146, [inserted fly-title for "Eula" section, unnumbered,] 
147 through 214, 214a, 215 through 248, [inserted fly- 
title for "The Long Summer" section, unnumbered,] 
249 through 267, 267a, 268 through 338, 338a, 339 
through 362, 362a, 363 through 371, 371a, 372 through 
374, 374a, 375, 376, 376a, 377 through 379, 379a, 379b, 
380 through 414, 415 [numbered 415 and 416], 417 
through 426, [inserted fly-title for "The Peasants" section, 
unnumbered,] 427 through 504, 504a, 505 through 536, 

10 For a note on the first version, see Catalogue item 163. 

72 



535> 53^ [despite the repetition, the text is continuous], 
537 through 574, 576 [the text is continuous from 574 
to 576], 577 through 582. 20 

13. Go Doiun, Moses (1942) 

a. "Was," typescript, 22 pp. Manuscript corrections. This is 
a complete, unpublished short story version of the open- 
ing chapter of the book. The pages numbered 1 through 
21, with p. 3a inserted, it differs in many ways from the 
published version. 21 

b. "The Fire and the Hearth" 

(1) "A Point of Law," typescript, 21 pp. Manuscript 
corrections. This is a complete version, the pages 
numbered from 1 through 2 1 , of the story which was 
revised to become the first chapter of "The Fire and 
the Hearth" in the book. The text of this typescript 
differs slightly from the short story publication in 
Collier's, CV (June 22, 1941). 

(2) "Gold Is Not Always" 

(a) Typescript, 5 pp. These are unnumbered pages of 
a version, or versions, preceding the complete type- 
script described below. 

(b) Typescript, 19 pp. Manuscript corrections. This 
is a complete version, the pages numbered from 
1 through 18 with the final page unnumbered, 
of the short story which was revised to become 
the second chapter of "The Fire and the Hearth" 
in the book. The text differs slightly from that 
published in Atlantic, CLXVI (November 1940). 

(3) "An Absolution" [typescript title]; also entitled 
"Apotheosis" [in pencil; probably in Faulkner's 
hand], typescript, 17 pp. Manuscript corrections. This 
is an earlier version of the typescript described be- 
low, "The Fire on the Hearth." It is incomplete, the 
pages numbered from 1 through 17, with the ending 
missing. Judging from the ending of "The Fire on 
the Hearth," only about nine typescript lines are 
missing. 22 

20 For a note on a carbon of this typescript, see Catalogue item 158. 

21 For a reproduction of p. 1 of this typescript, see Fig. 16; for a note on it, see 
Catalogue item 170. 

22 For a reproduction of p. 1 of this typescript, see Fig. 17. 

73 



(4) "The Fire on the Hearth" 

(a) Typescript, 20 pp. Manuscript corrections. This 
is a complete version, the pages numbered from 
1 through 20, of an unpublished short story 
which was revised to become the third chapter 
of "The Fire and the Hearth" in Go Down, 
Moses. It follows the typescript "An Absolution" 
described above. 

(b) Typescript, 26 pp. These are miscellaneous 
pages, some unnumbered, from several versions, 
none of them complete, of parts of the unpub- 
lished typescript "The Fire on the Hearth" de- 
scribed above. All of the pages appear to follow 
the corresponding pages of that typescript. A 
p. 29 of this group bears the title "The Fire and 
the Hearth," and on its verso appears the can- 
celled title "WAS / 1859". 

c. "Pantaloon in Black," carbon typescript, 24 pp. Manu- 
script corrections. This is a complete version of the story, 
the pages numbered from 1 through 24. Its text differs 
slightly from that published in Harper's, CLXXXI 
(October 1940). 

d. "The Old People," typescript, 17 pp. Manuscript cor- 
rections. This is a complete version, the pages numbered 
from 1 through 17, of the story. Its text differs from that 
published in Harper's, CLXXXI (September 1940). 

e. "The Bear," carbon typescript, 1 p. The text of this page, 
which is numbered 237, appears to have been revised 
and replaced by the p. 237 of the final typescript setting 
copy described below. 

f. "Delta Autumn," typescript, 18 pp. Manuscript correc- 
tions. This is a complete version of the story, the pages 
numbered from 1 through 17, with p. 4a inserted. The 
text differs slightly from that published in Story, XX 
(May-June 1942). 

g. "Go Down, Moses" 

(1) Typescript, 14 pp. Manuscript corrections. This is a 
complete version of the story, the pages numbered 
from 1 through 14. 

(2) Typescript, 1 p. This is the beginning of a version 
of the story. Numbered p. 1, it appears to follow the 
version described above. 

74 



(3) Carbon typescript, 17 pp. This is a complete version 
of the story, the pages numbered from 1 through 17. 
The text appears to follow that of the complete ver- 
sion and the single page described above, but it dif- 
fers slightly from that published in Collier's, CVII 
(January 25, 1941). 
h. Genealogy of McCaslin family, manuscript, 1 p. This pen- 
cil chart presents a somewhat different version of the Mc- 
Caslin family from that which appears in the published 
book. 23 
i. Typescript setting copy, 411 pp., plus 3 pp. front matter. 
Manuscript corrections. This is the complete text of the 
setting copy. The pages have been renumbered by ma- 
chine; the original numbering is as follows: 1 through 
4, 4a, 5 through 27, 27a, 28, 28a [inserted fly-title for 
"The Fire and the Hearth"], 29 through 54, 54a, 54b, 
54c, 54d, 55 through 71, 71a, 72 through 82, 82a, 83 
through 94, 94a, 95 through 131, 131a [inserted fly-title 
for "Pantaloon in Black"], 132 through 158, 158a [in- 
serted fly-title for "The Old People"], 159 through 185, 
185a [inserted fly-title for "The Bear"], 186 through 206, 
206b [typed as "2o6bis"], 207 through 247, 247a, 247b, 
247c, 247d, 247c, 247f [typed as "247F. 248, 249"; it is 
followed without a break in the text by p. 250], 250 
through 253, 253b [sic], 254 through 298, 298a, 299 
through 337, 337a [inserted fly-title for "Delta Autumn"], 
338 through 370, 370a [inserted fly-title for "Go Down, 
Moses"], 371 through 389. 24 
j. Galley proof, 1 sheet. This is an uncorrected galley of the 
beginning of the book, the fly-title of "Was" and the first 
page of its text. It is dated January 5. 
14. Intruder in the Dust (1948) 

a. Manuscript, 8 pp. One of these is a version of the begin- 
ning of the novel. The other seven are of miscellaneous 
passages of dialogue between characters of the book, as if 
in dramatic form. 

b. Typescript, 284 pp. Many manuscript corrections. These 

23 This chart is printed under Catalogue item 177. 

2 * See Catalogue item 173 for a note on a cancelled title on p. 186 of this type- 
script setting copy, and quotation from p. 253 of Faulkner's instructions for the 
printing of the fourth section of "The Bear." 

75 



are pages, including carbons, of several different versions, 
none of them complete, 
c. Typescript setting copy, 317 pp., plus 8 pp. front matter. 
Many manuscript corrections. The text is complete, and 
is numbered from 1 through 281, with the following 
thirty-six insertions: 15a, 16a, 18a, 21a, 21b, 28a, 29a, 39a, 
87a, 93a, 136a, 143a, 178a, 179a, 220a, 224a, 234a, 234b, 
234c, 234d, 238a, 243a, 243b, 243c, 244a, 247a, 257a, 257b, 
257c, 259a, 264a, 266a, 266b, 269a, 270a, 276a. [P. 218, 
between pp. 217 and 220, is numbered 218-219.] 25 

15. Knight's Gambit (1949) 

a. "Smoke" 

(1) Manuscript, 12 pp. The text is complete, numbered 
1 through 12, and differs from the published version. 

(2) Tear sheets from Harper's Magazine, CLXIV (April 
1932), 9 leaves. This is the complete text, pp. [562]- 

578. 

b. "Monk." See below under g., setting copy. 

c. "Hand upon the Waters" 

(1) Typescript, 2 pp. One page is unnumbered, the other 
bears the pencilled number 100 at the top, though 
this may not be a page number. The two pages are 
not continuous, and though both are versions of pas- 
sages in the two typescript versions below, it is diffi- 
cult to establish their precise relationship to these 
versions. 

(2) Typescript, 30 pp. Manuscript corrections. This is a 
complete version of the story, the pages numbered 
from 1 through 30. 

(3) Typescript, 30 pp. Manuscript corrections. This is a 
later version than the typescript listed under (2) 
above, but still differs from the published version. It 
lacks three pages of being complete. The pages are 
numbered from 1 through 33, with 25, 26, and 28 
missing. 

d. "Tomorrow," typescript, 20 pp. Manuscript corrections. 
This is a complete version of the story, the pages num- 
bered 1 through 20. It differs slightly from the printed 
version, and is untitled. 

25 For a reproduction of p. 65 of this typescript, see The Princeton University 
Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring 1957), Plate VII. 

76 



e. "An Error in Chemistry," typescript, 22 pp. Manuscript 
corrections. This carbon typescript differs from the pub- 
lished version. It is complete, the pages numbered from 
1 through 22. 

f. "Knight's Gambit" 

(1) Typescript, 23 pp. Manuscript corrections. This com- 
plete short story is an early version of the 33,000 title 
story of the book. The pages are numbered 1 through 
22, with 6a inserted. 26 

(2) Typescript, 50 pp. Manuscript corrections. These are 
miscellaneous pages, some of them carbons, from 
several versions, none of them complete. It is difficult 
to establish their precise relationship to the early 
short story version and the longer published version, 
though most of them appear to be drafts of the longer 
one made in revising the short story. 

g. Setting copy: typescript, 162 pp.; tearsheet leaves, 42. 
This is the complete setting copy, comprising a typescript 
version of the previously unpublished title story and tear- 
sheets (save for one page) for the other five stories from 
their previous published appearances: 

(1) "Smoke," typescript, 1 p.; tearsheets, 19 leaves. The 
tearsheets are pp. 121-158 from Doctor Martino and 
Other Stories (New York, 1934). The typescript page 
is copied without change from the first page of the 
story in Doctor Martino (p. 120), and is continuous 
with pp. 121-158, comprising the complete story. 

(2) "Monk," tearsheets, 5 leaves. These are pp. 16-24 °f 
Scribner's Magazine, CI (May 1937). 

(3) "Hand upon the Waters," tearsheets, 4 leaves. These 
are pp. 14, 15, 75, 76, 78, 79 of The Saturday Evening 
Post, CCXII (November 4, 1939). 

(4) "Tomorrow," tearsheets, 6 leaves. These are pp. 22, 
2 3> 3 2 > 35' 37> 3&' 39 °f The Saturday Evening Post, 
CCXIII (November 23, 1940). 

(5) "An Error in Chemistry," tearsheets, 8 leaves. These 
are pp. 5-19 of Eliery Queen's Mystery Magazine, VII 

(June 1946). 

(6) "Knight's Gambit," typescript, 161 pp. Manuscript 
corrections. The pages are numbered from 1 through 

26 For a note on p. 22 of this typescript, see Catalogue item 202. 

77 



148, with the following 13 inserted pages: 14a, 15a, 

30a, 44a, 44b, 44c, 44c!, 44c 441, 44g, 70a, 85a, 123a. 

h. Dead matter, samples, and layout for the printed book, 

28 sheets. 
i. Half-title leaf proofs or samples, 29 leaves. 

16. Requiem for a Nun (1951) 

a. Manuscript, 38 pp. These are miscellaneous passages from 
several versions. Since they do not all seem to precede the 
various typescript versions where they include the same 
material, it appears reasonable to assume that they do not 
represent an early, complete holograph which preceded 
the first typescript version, but only miscellaneous and 
fragmentary work done on portions of the book, perhaps 
when no typewriter was available. Both sides of some 
pages were used. 

b. Typescript, 303 pp. Manuscript corrections. These are 
miscellaneous pages from several versions, some of them 
carbons. 

c. Typescript setting copy, 285 pp., plus 6 pp. front matter. 
Manuscript corrections. The beginning of the typescript 
is missing (one or two pages); it is otherwise complete, de- 
spite gaps in the original pagination. It is numbered from 
1 through 282, with the following extra pages inserted: 
13a, 38a, 44a, 46a, 53a, 54a, 145a, 21 la, 238a, 258a. Though 
no gap in the text results, the following page numbers are 
not used: 96-98, 124, 125. The entire text has been re- 
paginated by machine, including the front matter. 

d. Bound galley proof, 93 sheets. This is a complete set of 
the uncorrected galleys, each sheet cut in half and the 
whole bound up in wrappers. 

e. Galley proof, corrected, 94 sheets. Many manuscript cor- 
rections and attached sheets with typescript additions and 
corrections. This is a complete set of the galleys, num- 
bered from 1 through 93, with an extra copy of 93. (One 
copy of 93 is corrected, the other not.) 27 

f. Front matter, typescript, 6 pp. 

g. Letter from Lemuel Ayres with notes on stage adaptation, 
typescript, 6 pp. The letter, dated July 11, 1951, is ad- 
dressed to Faulkner, and the 5 pp. of notes apparently 

27 For a reproduction of galley 93, corrected, see Fig. 22. 

78 



concern Ayres' suggestions for changes which would bene- 
fit a stage production. 

17. A Fable (1954) 

a. Manuscript, 10 pp. These are miscellaneous, fragmentary 
versions of various passages. 

b. Typescript, 179 pp. Manuscript corrections. These are 
typescript and carbon pages from several versions. 

c. Typescript setting copy, 691 pp., plus 6 pp. front matter. 
Manuscript corrections. The text appears to be complete, 
and the pages are numbered from 1 to 653, with twenty- 
eight extra pages inserted. 

18. Big Woods (1955) 

a. Setting copy: typescript, 34 pp.; tearsheet leaves, 95; galley 
sheets, 8; plus 17 pp. front matter and instructions. This 
is the complete setting copy, comprising tearsheets or 
galleys of the four stories included, with typescripts for 
the five brief pieces in italics which begin and end the 
book and link the stories. In a folder with a page of type- 
script instructions pasted onto the inside front cover. 

(1) Prelude, typescript, 3 pp. (Taken from pp. 101-105 
of Requiem for a Nun). 

(2) "The Bear," tearsheets, 72 leaves. This is the com- 
plete text of the story, pp. 191-331 of Go Down, 
Moses, with the fly-title which precedes it. The 
fourth section of the story, omitted from the print- 
ing in Big Woods, is cancelled (pp. 254-315). 

(3) Interlude, typescript, 9 pp. (Revised from sections 
of the story, "Red Leaves.") 

(4) "The Old People," tearsheets, 14 leaves. This is the 
complete text of the story, pp. 163-187 of Go Down, 
Moses, with the fly-title which precedes it. 

(5) Interlude, typescript, 4 pp. (Revised from sections 
of the story, "A Justice.") 

(6) "A Bear Hunt," tearsheets, 9 leaves. Manuscript and 
typescript revisions. The text is pp. 63-79 °f C°l~ 
lected Stories. Two typescript sheets with inserts are 
attached by staples. 

(7) Interlude, typescript, 6 pp. (Revised from sections of 
the article, "Mississippi.") 

79 



(8) "Race at Morning," galley proof, 8 sheets. These are 
galley proofs from the printing of the story in The 
Saturday Evening Post, CCXXVII (March 5, 1955). 

(9) Epilogue, typescript, 12 pp. (Revised from the story, 
"Delta Autumn," Go Down, Moses.) 

(10) Front matter, layout, and instructions, 17 pp. 

b. Page proof, 72 sheets. This is the complete page proof, 
uncorrected. 

c. Foundry proof, 214 pp., including illustrations. This is 
the complete foundry proof. 

19. The Town (1957) 

a. "Mule in the Yard," manuscript, 10 pp. This is a complete 
version, the pages numbered 1 through 10, of the short 
story which was incorporated into Chapter Sixteen of the 
novel. 28 

b. "Mule in the Yard," typescript, 10 pp. Manuscript cor- 
rections. This is a later but incomplete version of the 
above manuscript. The pages are numbered 1 through 4, 
7 through 12 (unfinished). 

c. Typescript setting copy, 488 pp., plus 10 pp. front matter. 
Manuscript corrections. The text is complete, and the 
pagination continuous, 1 through 477, with [478] un- 
numbered. 

d. Galley proof, 1 19 sheets. This complete set of the galleys 
bears the corrections of the editor and a few replies by the 
author to editorial questions. 29 

e. Page proof, 123 sheets. This complete set of the page 
proofs was corrected by the editor but not the author. 

f. Foundry proof, 361 pp. Though this set of the foundry 
proofs (sometimes called plate proofs) includes all the 
front matter of the book, the following fifteen pages are 
missing from the text: 151, 253, 263, 272, 278, 319, 323, 
340, 342, 344, 348, 353, 357, 367, 370. 

g. Specifications print sample, 4 pp. This sample consists 
of two conjugate leaves, for pp. 3, 4, and 5, with the 
specifications (dated October 30, 1956) on the verso of 
P- 5- 

28 For a reproduction of p. 1 of this manuscript, see Fig. 23. 

29 Two of these galleys appear as illustrations in the Princeton University 
Library Chronicle, XVIII (Spring 1957), Plate VIII. 

80 



B. UNPUBLISHED 

i. "Elmer" 

a. Manuscript, 4 pp. Two are unnumbered, two represent be- 
ginnings of the novel and are both numbered 1. 

b. Typescript, 130 pp. Passages from several versions are in- 
cluded in the total. The pages are numbered as follows: 
1-2, 1-33, 44-51, nineteen unnumbered pages, 66-94, 73- 
106, and five unnumbered. 30 

Four titles are given to the various versions of the be- 
ginning of this unfinished novel: "Elmer," "Elmer and 
Myrtle," "Portrait of Elmer Hodge," and "Growing 
Pains." According to Faulkner (interview March 12, 
1958), he wrote it in Paris on his trip abroad after being 
in New Orleans [1925], but left it unfinished — it was 
"funny, but not funny enough." 

2. "The Devil Beats His Wife" manuscript, 3 pp. All unnum- 
bered, but consecutive, these pages comprise a beginning to 
a novel or story. According to Faulkner (interview March 12, 
1958), he began it in the 1920's after his return from abroad 
[1925], but soon abandoned it. The title was picked up by his 
friend Ben Wasson, who used it for a novel (New York, 
Harcourt, Brace, 1929). 

II. SHORT STORIES 

A. PUBLISHED 

1. "Ad Astra" manuscript, 11 pp. (1-6, 6a, 7-10). [Differs from 
version first published in American Caravayi IV, 1931.] 

2. "All the Dead Pilots" manuscript, 10 pp. (1-10). [Differs 
from version published in These 73, 1931.] 

3. "An Artist at Home" manuscript, 13 pp. (1-13). [Differs from 
version published, entitled "Artist at Home," in Story, III 

(Aug. 1933).] 

4. "Beyond" 

a. Typescript, entitled "Beyond the Gate," 27 pp. (1-27). 

b. Manuscript, 9 pp. (1-9). [Though it differs somewhat from 
the version published in Harper's, CLXVII (Sept. 1933), 
this manuscript is later than the above typescript.] 

30 For a reproduction of p. 1 of this typescript, see Fig. 7. 

81 



5. "Black Music" manuscript, 11 pp. ( 1-1 1). [Differs from the 
version published in Doctor Martino, 1934.] 

6. "The Brooch" 

a. Manuscript, 5 pp. (1-5). 

b. Carbon typescript, 15 pp. (1-15). [A manuscript note, in 
Faulkner's hand, on the verso of p. 7 is dated "Jan 1, 
1931". This typescript appears to follow the above manu- 
script version and to precede the bound carbon typescript 
below.] 

c. Bound carbon typescript, 29 pp. (1-29). In blue folder. 
[Differs slightly from version published in Scribner's, 
XCIX (Jan. 1936).] 

7. "Carcassonne" 

a. Typescript, 7 pp. (1-7). Manuscript corrections. 

b. Typescript, 7 pp. (1-7). [Follows the above typescript, but 
differs slightly from version published in These 13, 1931-] 

8. "A Courtship" carbon typescript, 22 pp. (1-22). Manuscript 
corrections. [Published in Sewanee Review, LVI (Autumn 
1948). On the verso of several pages are typescript pages from 
a version of the story "Shall Not Perish."] 

["Crevasse" see "Victory"] 

g. "Death Drag" 

a. Manuscript, 11 pp. (1-1 1). 

b. Carbon typescript, entitled "A Death-Drag," 27 pp. (1-27). 
[Follows the above manuscript, but differs slightly from 
published version below.] 

c. Tearsheets, 5 leaves. (Pp. 34-42 from Scribner's, XCI [Jan. 
1932].) 

10. "Divorce in Naples" 

a. Manuscript, 6 pp. (unnumbered, but complete). First 
page bears cancelled title "Equinox." 

b. Carbon typescript, 17 pp. (1-17). First page bears manu- 
script note "Unpublished" in Faulkner's hand. [Follows 
the above manuscript, but differs from version published 
in These /_?, 1931.] 

11. "Doctor Martino" 

a. Manuscript, 14 pp. (1-14). 

b. Manuscript, 10 pp. (1, 2, 3, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, and two un- 
numbered). [Apparently follows above manuscript.] 

82 



c. Typescript, 5 pp. (27-31). [Apparently follows above 
manuscript, but differs from version published in 
Harper's, CLXIII (Nov. 1931).] 

12. "Dry September" 

a. Manuscript, entitled "Drouth," 8 pp. (unnumbered). 

b. Carbon typescript, 19 pp. (1-10, 12-18, 18, 19 [despite 
gap and duplication in pagination, text is continuous and 
complete]). First page bears manuscript note "Scribner's" 
in Faulkner's hand. [Follows above manuscript, but differs 
slightly from published version below.] 

c. Tearsheets, 4 leaves. (Pp. 49-56 from Scribner's, LXXXIX 
[Jan. 1931].) 

d. Tearsheets of French translation by Maurice E. Coin- 
dreau, entitled "Septembre Ardent," 9 leaves. (Pp. 49-65 
from La Nouvelle Revue Francaise, XXXVIII [Jan. 

1932]-) 

13. "Elly" 

a. Manuscript, entitled "Selvage," 6 pp. (1-6). 

b. Typescript, entitled "Selvage," 14 pp. (1-14). Manuscript 
corrections. [Follows the above manuscript, and precedes 
the manuscript below.] 

c. Manuscript, 11 pp. (1-11). [Differs from version published 
in Story, IV (Feb. 1934).] 

14. "Foxhunt" 

a. Manuscript, entitled "A Fox-Hunt," 1 1 pp. (unnumbered, 
save for p. 6). 

b. Typescript, 26 pp. (1-19, and seven unnumbered). Manu- 
script corrections. [Follows the above manuscript, but 
differs slightly from published version below.] 

c. Tearsheets, 5 leaves. (Pp. 393-402 from Harper's, CLXIII 
[Sept. 1931].) 

15. "Idyll in the Desert" manuscript, 4 pp. (unnumbered). 

[Differs from version published in 1931 by Random 
House, New York.] 

16. "A Justice" manuscript, 10 pp. (unnumbered). [Differs from 

version published in These 13, 1931.] 

17. "The Leg" 

a. Manuscript, 10 pp. (1-10). 

b. Carbon typescript, 26 pp. (1-26). [Follows above manu- 

83 



script; published, entitled "Leg," in Doctor Martino, 
1934-] 

18. "Miss Zilphia Gant" 

a. Manuscript, g pp. (1-9). 

b. Typescript, 18 pp. (1-18). Manuscript corrections. In 
folder. [Appears to follow above manuscript, and precede 
carbon typescript below.] 

c. Carbon typescript, 23 pp. (1-23). [Differs slightly from 
version published in 1932 by the Book Club of Texas.] 

d. Library of Congress Copyright Office certificate of copy- 
right registration for book version, 1932. [See Catalogue 
item 86.] 

19. "Mistral" 

a. Manuscript, 17 pp. (1-17). 

b. Carbon typescript, 46 pp. (1-13, 12-44 [despite duplica- 
tion in pagination, text is continuous]). [Follows above 
manuscript; published in These 13, 1931.] 

20. "A Mountain Victory" 

a. Manuscript, 18 pp. (ten unnumbered pages; 9, 9a, 10, 
10a, 11-13; an d one unnumbered page). [The text is 
apparently complete, and precedes the typescript below.] 

b. Carbon typescript, 42 pp. (1-42). Manuscript corrections. 
[Differs slightly from the version published in Sat. Eve. 
Post, CCV (Dec. 3, 1932).] 

21. "My Grandmother Millard and General Bedford Forrest and 

the Battle of Harrykin Creek" 

a. Typescript, 2 pp. (1-2). Incomplete. 

b. Carbon typescript, 2 pp. (1-2). [Carbon of above type- 
script. This version of the beginning of the story differs 
from that of the complete typescript below.] 

c. Carbon typescript, 42 pp. (1-42). Manuscript corrections. 
[Differs slightly from version published in Story, XXII 
(March-April 1943).] 

22. "Pennsylvania Station" 

a. Manuscript, 8 pp. (1-8). 

b. Manuscript, 1 p. (1). [This beginning of the story differs 
from that of the above manuscript.] 

c. Typescript, 2 pp. (unnumbered). 

d. Typescript, 4 pp. (19-22). [These pages, and the above 

84 



two, of typescript, differ from the corresponding parts 
of the other versions listed here, but their relationship to 
them is not clear.] 
e. Typescript, 20 pp. (1-19, last page unnumbered). Manu- 
script corrections. [Differs from version published in 
American Mercury, XXXI (Feb. 1934).] 

23. "Red Leaves" 

a. Manuscript, 12 pp. (1, second page unnumbered, 3-12). 

b. Carbon typescript, 36 pp. (1-7, eighth page unnumbered, 
g-36). [Follows above manuscript, but differs from version 
published in Sat. Eve. Post, CCIII (Oct. 25, 1930).] 

24. "A Rose for Emily" 

a. Manuscript, 6 pp. (1-6), incomplete. 

b. Carbon typescript, 17 pp. (1, second page unnumbered, 
3-16, last page unnumbered). First page bears manuscript 
note "Sold to Forum, 1-20-30" in Faulkner's hand. [Fol- 
lows above manuscript, but still differs from published 
version below.] 

c. Tearsheets, 3 leaves. (Pp. 233-238 from Forum, LXXXIII 
[April 1930].) 

25. "Shall Not Perish" 

a. Carbon typescript, 16 pp. (1-16). Manuscript corrections. 
[On verso of p. 1 is part of a version of "A Courtship."] 

b. Typescript, 4 pp. (1, 2, 19, and one unnumbered). Manu- 
script corrections. [Differs from the corresponding pas- 
sages in the above carbon typescript.] 

c. Carbon typescript, 1 1 pp. Miscellaneous pages of several 
versions, incomplete. [All versions listed here appear to 
differ from that published in Story, XXIII (July-Aug. 
1943)0 

26. "Shingles for the Lord" carbon typescript, 21 pp. (1-21). 
[Differs somewhat from version published in Sat. Eve. Post, 
CCXV (Feb. 13, 1943).] 

27. "That Evening Sun" carbon typescript, 26 pp. (1-26). The 
first page bears the original title " — That Evening Sun Go 
Down" with the last two words cancelled, and the remaining 
three words written in again in ink, in Faulkner's hand. Above 
the title Faulkner has written and cancelled the name 
"Forum" and added the name "Mercury". [Differs somewhat 

85 



from version published in American Mercury, XXII (March 
193O0 

28. "The Tall Men" carbon typescript, 18 pp. (1-18). [Published 
in Sat. Eve. Post, CCXIII (May 31, 1941).] 

29. "There Was a Queen" 

a. Manuscript, entitled "An Empress Passed," and Avith 
cancelled title "Through the Window," 8 pp. (1-8). 

b. Typescript, 25 pp. (1-5, 5a, 6-24). Manuscript corrections. 
[Follows above manuscript, but differs somewhat from 
version published in Scribner's, XCIII (Jan. 1933).] 

c. Carbon typescript, 25 pp. [Carbon of above typescript.] 

30. "Thrift" 

a. Manuscript, 5 pp. (1-5), incomplete. 

b. Typescript, 18 pp. (24-41), incomplete. [This ending of 
the story follows the corresponding passages in the above 
manuscript, but differs from the ending of the version 
published in Sat. Eve. Post, CCIII (Sept. 6, 1930).] 

31. "Turn About" manuscript, 16 pp. (first page unnumbered, 
2-16). [Differs from version published in Sat. Eve. Post, CCIV 
(March 5, 1932).] 

32. "Victory" 

a. Manuscript, 9 pp. Miscellaneous pages, only one (p. 1) 
numbered, incomplete. 

b. Typescript, 56 pp. (1-41, 43-57), incomplete. Manuscript 
corrections. [Precedes typescript below. The episode on 
pp. 22-41 of this typescript constitutes a version of the 
story "Crevasse," published in These 13, 1931. It is in- 
complete, but would apparently be completed by the 
missing p. 42. On p. 22 the title "Crevasse" is written in, 
apparently by Faulkner.] 

c. Typescript, 49 pp. (3-51), incomplete. [Follows above 
typescript, but differs from version published in These 75, 
1931. Pp. 25-33 constitute the "Crevasse" episode, which 
is complete here, though untitled.] 

B. UNPUBLISHED 

1. "Adolescence" typescript, 26 pp. (1-26). According to Faulk- 
ner (interview March 12, 1958), it was written in the early 
1920's. 

86 



2. "The Big Shot" typescript, 37 pp. (1-4, 4a, 5-36). Manuscript 
corrections. Faulkner had submitted it to five magazines by 
mid- April, 1930 (see Appendix). 

3. "Love" 

a. Manuscript, 13 pp. (1-13). Apparently complete, this 
version differs from the incomplete manuscript and the 
typescript below. 

b. Manuscript, 5 pp. (1, 3, 6, 7, and 1). These miscellaneous 
pages may be from more than one version. 

c. Typescript, 49 pp. (1-47, and two unnumbered). Incom- 
plete. According to Faulkner (interview March 12, 1958), 
it was written about 192 1[?]. 

4. "Moonlight" carbon typescript, 16 pp. (1-16). Incomplete. 
According to Faulkner (interview March 12, 1958), it was 
written around 1919 or 1920 or 1921 and is "about the first 
short story I ever wrote." 

5. "Rose of Lebanon" manuscript, 9 pp. (all unnumbered), in- 
complete [?]. Faulkner submitted it to three magazines in 
1930 and 1931 (see Appendix). 

6. "Snow" 

a. Typescript, 2 pp. (13a, 13b). Manuscript corrections. 
These two pages precede the corresponding passages in 
the complete carbon typescript below. 

b. Carbon typescript, 18 pp. (1-13, 13a, 13b, 14-16). Accord- 
ing to his agent's records, Faulkner submitted this story in 
1942. 

7. "The Wishing-Tree" typescript, 47 pp. (1-47). Manuscript 
corrections. Faulkner wrote this children's story in the 1920's 
for the daughter of a friend (see Catalogue item 211). 

8. "With Caution and Dispatch" 

a. Typescript, 2 pp. (1, 10). It is not clear what their rela- 
tionship is to the corresponding passages of the typescript 
below. 

b. Typescript, 47 pp. (1-47), incomplete. Manuscript cor- 
rections. According to Faulkner (interview March 12, 
1958), this story dates from about the time of "Turn 
About" (1932). But on the versos of nine pages of the 
setting copy of The Hamlet (pp. 530-536, 535-536 [sic]) 
are pages from what is presumably a later version (see 

87 



Catalogue item 213). According to his agent's records, 
Faulkner submitted this story to him early in 1940. 31 

9. [untitled] typescript, 23 pp. (1-23). This obviously early 
story is related to Faulkner's sketch "The Kid Learns," in the 
New Orleans Times-Picayune Sunday magazine, May 31, 
1925, p. 2. 

III. VERSE 

A. PUBLISHED 

1. "Cathay," typescript, 1 p. Text differs slightly from that pub- 
lished in The Mississippian, November 12, 1919, p. 8. 32 

2. "April," typescript, 2 pp. Text identical with that published 
in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 2. Above the title on 
the first page is the number 9, in ink. 

3. "I Will Not Weep for Youth," typescript, 1 p. Manuscript 
corrections. The text, as corrected, is identical with that 
published in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 1. The title 
appears to have been written in pencil in a hand not Faulk- 
ner's; though it has been erased, it is still faintly legible. 
Below the title is the number 1. 

4. ["Knew I Love Once,"] typescript, 1 p. Manuscript corrections. 
The text, as corrected, is identical with that published in 
Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 1. 33 

5. "My Epitaph," typescript, 1 p. The text is identical with that 
published in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 2. (Also 
published, revised, as A Green Bough, XLIV.) 

6. "Spring," typescript, 1 p. The text is identical with that 
published in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 2. (Also 
published, revised, as A Green Bough, XXXVI.) It is dated 
at the bottom of the page in Faulkner's hand "13 December, 
1924". Above the title has been pencilled, probably not in 
Faulkner's hand, the number 14. 

si For a reproduction of p. 1 of this typescript, see Fig. 25. 

32 For a reproduction of this typescript, see Fig. 3. 

33 A revised version of this poem appeared in Faulkner's second book of verse, 
A Green Bough, New York, 1933. The forty-four poems of this collection are num- 
bered but untitled; this poem appears as number XXXIII. (Subsequent refer- 
ences to this collection will appear in the text.) 

88 



7. "To a Virgin," typescript, 1 p. The text is identical with 
that published in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 2. (Also 
published, revised, as A Green Bough, XXXIX.) 

8. "Twilight," typescript, 1 p. The text is identical with that 
published in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 1. (Also 
published, revised, as A Green Bough, X.) The title appears 
to have been written in pencil, in a hand not Faulkner's; 
though it has been erased, it is still faintly legible. Below 
the title is the number 5. 

9. "Vision in Spring," typescript, 3 pp. The text is identical with 
that published in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 1, en- 
titled "Visions in Spring," save for the presence of an ac- 
cent mark over the word "hushed" in line nineteen of the 
typescript. Above the title is the number 2, in ink. 

10. "Winter Is Gone,"] typescript, 1 p. The text is identical 
with that published in Contempo, I (February 1, 1932), p. 2. 
It is possible that the title was once pencilled in; several 
words at the head of the text have been erased and are illegi- 
ble. Below the erasure is the number 3. 

11. "A Child Looks from His Window," typescript, 1 p. The text 
is identical with that published in Contempo, II (May 25, 
1932), p. 3, save that the published text is italicized. 

12. "Marriage," typescript, 4 pp. The text differs slightly from 
that published as A Green Bough, II. At the top of the first 
page is the number 8, in ink. At the bottoms of the four 
pages, in order, the numbers g, 10, 11, and 12, each in 
parentheses, have been erased, but remain legible. 

13. "Philosophy," typescript, 2 pp. The text differs slightly from 
that published as A Green Bough, V. There is one manuscript 
correction, apparently not in Faulkner's hand. At the bottom 
of the first page is the number 2 1; at the bottom of the second, 
the number 22; both numbers are in parentheses, and both 
have been erased, but are still legible. 

14. ["Man Comes, Man Goes,"] typescript, 1 p. The text differs 
slightly from that published as A Green Bough, VI. (The 
title supplied here, from the first line, was used for the pub- 
lication of the poem in The New Republic, LXXIV [May 

89 



3> J 933]> P- 338-) At the bottom of the page the number 1, in 
parentheses, has been erased, but is still legible. 

15. ["Night Piece,"] typescript, 2 pp. The text differs in a few 
details from that published as A Green Bough, VII. (The 
title supplied here was used for the publication of the poem 
in The Neio Republic, LXXIV [April 12, 1933], p. 253.) 
There is one manuscript correction, apparently not in Faulk- 
ner's hand. On the verso of the second page, not in Faulk- 
ner's hand, is the pencilled note "And [sic] of Section". At 
the top of the first page the number XXVIII was apparently 
typed, then the last I erased to make the number XXVII, and 
that number finally cancelled in ink. 

16. [untitled,] typescript, 1 p. The text differs slightly from that 
published as A Green Bough, IX. At the top of the page 
appears the number 4. 

17. [untitled,] typescript, 1 p. The text as published in A Green 
Bough, XI, omits the second stanza of this typescript version, 
and differs in other details. At the top of the page appears 
the number 7. 

18. [untitled,] typescript, 1 p. The text differs slightly from that 
published as A Green Bough, XII. At the top of the page 
appears the number 6. 

19. [untitled,] typescript, 1 p. The text differs slightly from that 
published as A Green Bough, XIII. At the top of the page 
appears the number 8. 

20. "Puck and Death," typescript, 1 p. The text differs slightly 
from that published as A Green Bough, XVI. At the bottom 
of the page the number 7, in parentheses, has been erased, 
but is still legible. 

21. "On Seeing the Winged Victory for the First Time," type- 
script, 1 p. The text differs slightly from that published as 
A Green Bough, XVII. 

22. "La Lune ne Grade Aucune Rancune," typescript, 1 p. The 
text is identical, save for the omission of capitals, with that 
published as A Green Bough, XXXII. At the bottom of the 
page appears a typed inscription by Faulkner for Sam Gil- 
more. 3 * 

34 For a reproduction of this page, see Fig. 4. The verb in the title is presum- 
ably spelled incorrectly; the expression garder rancune means to owe a grudge. 

90 



23. "Nativity," typescript, 1 p. The text differs slightly from 
that published as A Green Bough, XXXIV. One pencilled 
change in Faulkner's hand ("to swell" for "within", line 11) 
is incorporated into the published text. 

24. "Cleopatra," typescript, 1 p. The text as published in A 
Green Bough, XXXVII, differs somewhat, including the 
change of "Cleopatra" to "Lilith" in line 9. At the bottom 
of the page it is dated in ink, in Faulkner's hand, "9 Decem- 
ber 1924". 

25. "The Flowers That Died," typescript, 1 p. The text is identi- 
cal with that published in Contempo, III (June 25, 1933), 
p. 1, save that the published text is italicized. One manu- 
script revision in Faulkner's hand ("day is born" for "it is 
morn", line 16) is incorporated into the published text. The 
title appears to have been written in pencil, in a hand not 
Faulkner's, and then erased; it is still faintly legible. 

B. UNPUBLISHED 

1. "Adolescence," typescript, 1 p. Twenty-eight lines, in seven 
stanzas. First line, "Within this garden close, where after- 
noon". 

2. "The Dancer," typescript, 1 p. Twenty lines, in five stanzas. 
First line, "I am Youth, so swift, so white, so slim,". Beneath 
the title is the dedication "to V. de G. F." Above the title, in 
ink, is the number 1. At the bottom of the page the number 
4, in parentheses, has been erased, but is still legible. 

3. "Eunice," typescript, 3 pp. Sixty-eight lines, in seventeen 
stanzas. First line, "Is this the house where Eunice lived,". 
The pencilled corrections on the last page appear not to be 
in Faulkner's hand. At the bottoms of the three pages, in 
order, the numbers 17, 18, and 19, each in parentheses, have 
been erased, but remain legible. 

4. "The Shepherd's Love," typescript, 1 p. Twenty lines, in 
five stanzas. First line, "O come, sweet love, and let us keep". 

5. "To Elise," typescript, 1 p. Sixteen lines, in four stanzas. 
First line, "Where has flown the spring we knew together?" 
Above the title, in ink, probably not in Faulkner's hand, is 
the word Dedication. At the bottom of the page is typed "5 
December, 1924". 

91 



6. [untitled,] typescript, 1 p. Sixteen lines, in four stanzas. First 
line, "Shall I recall this tree, when I am old?" Above the text 
appears the number 1. 

7. [untitled,] typescript, 1 p. Twelve lines, in three stanzas. 
First line, "Sweet will it be to us who sleep". 

8. [untitled,] typescript, 1 p. Sixteen lines, in four stanzas. First 
line, "Where I am dead the clover loved of bees". The second 
stanza has been cancelled. There is a one-word correction in 
Faulkner's hand. At the bottom is typed "William Faulkner / 
New Orleans / 10 February 1925". 

IV. WRITING FOR MOVIES AND TELEVISION 

1. The Big Sleep manuscript, 1 p. This page of dialogue was 
identified by Faulkner (interview March 12, 1958). 

2. "Continuous Performance" carbon typescript, 38 pp. (1-30, 
30a, 31-37). An unidentified screen treatment. Cary Grant 
is noted as a possibility for casting. 

3. "Old Man" 

a. Typescript and carbon typescript, 22 pp. (1-16, 16a, 16b, 
17-20). Manuscript corrections. On the versos of some of 
the pages appear typescript pages and passages from ver- 
sions of Faulkner's article "Mississippi," and from his 
television script from the story "Shall Not Perish." 

b. Carbon typescript, 26 pp. (first page unnumbered, 2-26). 
Follows above version. Manuscript corrections. 

c. Carbon typescript letter, 1 p. Dated April 16, 1953, from 
Saxe Commins to Martin Jurow of the William Morris 
Agency, the letter describes this "full synopsis . . . for a 
working script" (i.e., treatment) made by Faulkner from 
the "Old Man" section of his 1939 novel, The Wild 
Palms. (Apparently this treatment was made for the pur- 
pose of television, rather than movie, performance.) 

4. "One Way to Catch a Horse" carbon typescript, 36 pp. (1-35, 
last page unnumbered). Manuscript corrections. An uni- 
dentified treatment (the hero is Ernest Trueblood). 

5. "Revolt in the Earth" carbon typescript, 62 pp. (1-62). This 
is a treatment of Faulkner's 1936 novel Absalom, Absalom! 

92 



by Faulkner and Dudley Murphy. Attached is a Warner 
Brothers house telegram concerning it, dated January 6, 1943. 

6. [untitled science fiction treatment] typescript and carbon 
typescript, 2 pp. This incomplete treatment is unidentified 
(characters who appear are Zweistein and Dale), but dated 
by two accompanying letters from Faulkner to Howard 
Hawks. The first, dated June 18, 1948, is 1 p. typescript, 
unsigned; the second, dated June 29, 1948, is 2 pp. carbon 
typescript, unsigned. 

7. [untitled script] typescript, 31 pp. (29-30, 56-83, 113). This 
unidentified script (characters who appear are Sarastro, Anna, 
Rico, and David) may date from the early 1940's. 

V. MISCELLANEOUS 

1. [untitled,] introduction to The Sound and the Fury [?], type- 
script, 4 pp. (2-5). Internal evidence suggests that this piece 
was written no earlier than 1932 and no later than 1934. It 
discusses the writing of the first seven of his novels, par- 
ticularly The Sound and the Fury, and may quite possibly 
have been intended for the Random House edition of The 
Sound and the Fury which was announced for publication, 
with an introduction by Faulkner, in 1933, but was never 
brought out. 



\-l' 



2. The Viking Portable Faulkner 

a. Appendix on Compson family, carbon typescript, 12 pp. 

(1-2, 4-13), incomplete. 

b. "Dilsey" section, typescript, 35 pp. (first page unnum- 
bered, 2-35). 

3. [untitled,] commencement address, manuscript, 2 pp. This 
is a version of the address Faulkner made to the srraduatins: 
class of University High School, Oxford, Miss., May 28, 1951. 
It was printed in the Oxford Eagle, May 31, 1951, p. 1. 



93 



PART THREE 
THE ENGLISH EDITIONS 



Introduction 



I. Published in England: 

1. Soldiers' Pay 1930 15. 

2. The Sound and the Fury 16. 

3. Sanctuary 1931 18. 

4. Sartoris 1932 19. 

5. Light in August 1933 20. 

6. These Thirteen 1933 21. 

7. Doctor Martino 1934 22. 

8. Pylon 1935 

9. As I Lay Dying 1935 23. 
10. Absalom, Absalom! 1937 

II. The Unvanquished 1938 24. 

12. The Wild Palms 1939 

13. The Hamlet 1940 25. 

14. Go Doiun, Moses 1942 26. 



Intruder in the Dust 1949 
Knight's Gambit 1951 
Collected Stories 1951 
Requiem for a Nun 1953 
^4 Fable 1955 
Faulkner's County 1955 
T/ze Toivn 1958 
Collected Short Stories, 

Vol. I 1958 
Collected Short Stories, 

Vol. II 1958 
Collected Short Stories, 

Vol. Ill 1959 
New Orleans Sketches 1959 
The Mansion 1961 



II. Published in Other Countries: 

A. FRANCE 

B. GERMANY 

C. JAPAN 

D. SWEDEN 



INTRODUCTION 

Faulkner's text is becoming the subject of sufficiently close 
critical scrutiny to make worth while at this time a fairly detailed 
study of the English editions of his works. In this bibliographical 
listing I have therefore been primarily concerned with the print- 
ing history of the English text, and I have tried to provide sufficient 
description to identify each edition, impression, and issue I have 
encountered. Final solution of some of the problems described 
here — chiefly those concerning the so-called Chatto and Windus 
"cheap editions" — will have to await the passage of time and 
the examination of many more copies of several of the books, 
and the present listing should be regarded as a preliminary de- 
scription rather than an attempt to cover the ground in any 
final fashion. A more definitive treatment of the subject, in 
addition to answering the questions raised here, would properly 
concern itself with variations between the English and American 
texts, by collation of the impressions and editions which I have 
tried to determine here. 

In preparation for this listing I examined, in the summer of 
1958, all copies of Faulkner's books to be found in four of the 
British copyright depositories: the British Museum, the Bodleian, 
the Library of Cambridge University, and the Scottish National 
Library. All four had complete or nearly complete sets of the 
first English editions issued through 1955. Also examined were 
the copies of the books to be found in the libraries of Trinity 
College, Dublin; Queen's College, Belfast; the University of 
Glasgow; and the University of Edinburgh. In addition, the file 
copies in the office of Chatto and Windus, London, were ex- 
amined. In this country, a few copies were found in the libraries 
of Princeton, Yale, and Harvard, and more in the private col- 
lections of the individuals mentioned below. In every case, a 
total of at least six copies were seen of each of the "first editions" 
described in the primary bibliographical listings provided, save 
for the dust jackets. These were missing from all the copies in the 
British libraries, of course, and from many seen elswhere, so that 
in many cases I saw only one copy of the jacket described, and 
in one case have seen none at all. For all the subsequent or 
variant states, issues, impressions, and editions listed, I have seen at 
least two copies unless otherwise noted. 

99 



Where I have listed a later impression or edition as "not 
examined," the information given was taken from the annual 
volumes of the English Catalogue of Books. Prices and dates of 
publication were sometimes taken from the same source. In every 
case, the date of publication and number of copies of the first 
impression were supplied by Chatto and Windus. I have also given 
the acquisition date which the Scottish National Library so help- 
fully provides for its books, as a piece of evidence which supports 
the claims of these copyright deposit copies for primacy in the 
descriptions. This evidence may prove particularly helpful in 
the case of those books which Chatto and Windus, in the 1930's, 
issued in their so-called "cheap editions," where it is obvious in 
some cases that they were merely issuing unsold copies of the 
original (and probably only) impression, perhaps newly bound 
up, perhaps with only the dust jacket to indicate their newly 
lowered status. 

A few Faulkner books which have been published in English 
in non-English-speaking countries are listed separately at the end 
of this section. 

To the staffs of the various British libraries where I worked, 
particularly those of the British Museum, the Bodleian, and the 
Scottish National Library, I am indebted for many courtesies. 
My chief obligation in Britain, however, is to Mr. Bertram 
Rota, upon whose patience I imposed more often than I care 
to think, and whose advice frequently pointed the way toward 
the solution of problems beyond the capacities of my biblio- 
graphical inexperience. Mr. Anthony Brett-James and Miss Anne 
Grint, of Chatto and Windus, were likewise subjected to repeated 
impositions upon their busy schedules, and I should like to thank 
them especially for their assistance. 1 But perhaps my greatest debt 
in Britain, measured by hours and tolerance expended, is to my 
wife, who spent an inordinate amount of what was supposed to 
be a vacation in transcribing title-pages and doing other harmless- 
seeming drudgery in libraries. 

In this country, for helpful correspondence and for permitting 
me to examine their books, I am indebted to three collectors, 
Carl Petersen, James Bloom, and particularly to Linton Massey, 
who kindly placed at my disposal his English editions at a time 
that was most inconvenient to him. 

1 After I had received the galley proof of this book, Mr. Gordon Price-Stevens 
was kind enough to check a number of details for me in British libraries. 

100 



I. Published in England: 

1. Soldiers' Pay 1930 

soldiers' / pay I By I William Faulkner / with a preface 
by / Richard Hughes / London / Chatto and Windus / 1930 

Green cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained green. 
Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 7/16 X 4 3/4 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered in black and decorated in red. 

[A] 6 B-X 8 Y 4 [Z] 2 . Pp. [i-ii] blank; [iii] half-title; [iv] publisher's 
statement of intent to publish three other books by author; 
[v] title-page, as above; [vi] copyright page; [vii-viii] epigraph, 
verso blank; ix-xi Preface by Richard Hughes; [xii] blank; 
[i]-326 text; [327-328] colophon, verso blank; [329-332] ads. 

Publication date, 20 June, 1930. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 23 
June.) 2000 copies. 75. 6d. 

Later impressions and editions: 

Second impression, September 1930. (So states on copyright 
page.) 75. 6d. 

Centaur Library (Chatto and Windus "cheap edition"), Feb- 
ruary 1932. 35. 6d. The only copy I have examined is one of 
the second impression (see above entry), but with a Centaur 
Library label pasted on the spine of the dust jacket. Addi- 
tional evidence that this "cheap edition" consisted merely 
of unsold copies of the second impression is supplied by the 
publisher's advertisement in the 1935 As I Lay Dying, which 
states that the second impression of Soldiers' Pay may be 
obtained for either 75. 6d. or $s. 6d. 

Penguin edition, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books Limited, 
January 1938. 310 pp. 6d. Includes the Hughes Preface. 

New Phoenix Library, Chatto and Windus, March 1951, 326 
pp. 55. Text reproduced by photo-offset from the original 
Chatto and Windus setting, but without the Hughes Preface. 

note: Within a few weeks of publication, the price was raised to 65., and 
the book was issued with a dust jacket bearing the new price. 

"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, 1957. 326 pp. 95. 6d. 
Reproduced by photo-offset, without the Hughes Preface. 

101 



2. The Sound and the Fury 1931 

THE SOUND / AND THE FURY / WILLIAM FAULKNER / WITH AN 
INTRODUCTION BY / RICHARD HUGHES / CHATTO AND WINDUS, 
LONDON / 1931 

Black cloth, stamped in red on spine. Top edges stained red. 
Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 4 7/8 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered and decorated in red and black. 

[A] 6 B-X 8 Y 2 [Z] 2 . Pp. [i-ii] blank; [iii] half-title; [iv] list of books 
by author; [v] title-page, as above; [vi] copyright page; vii-ix 
Introduction by Richard Hughes; [x] blank; [xi-xii] Con- 
tents, verso blank; 1-321 text; [322] colophon; [323-326] ads; 
[327-328] blank. 

Publication date, 16 April, 1931. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 18 
April.) 2000 copies. 75. 6d. 

note: In all copies examined of this issue in black cloth, the two conjugate 
leaves of ads (signature [Z]2 in the above collation) have been inserted between the 
two leaves of signature Y. The ads are missing from two copies seen of what appears 
to be a later binding-up of sheets from the first impression. These two copies, other- 
wise apparently identical to the issue in black cloth, are bound in tan cloth, stamped 
in red on spine, top edges unstained, and bottom edges trimmed. Both are in dust 
jackets apparently identical to that of the only copy with dust jacket I have seen of 
the issue in black cloth, but the price has been removed from the jacket of one. It is 
possible that the removal of the price in this copy indicates that it was issued in the 
Centaur Library and consequently sold at a lower price. 

Later impressions and editions: 

Centaur Library, Chatto and Windus, March 1933. 35. 6d. Not 

examined, but see above note. 
"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, 1954. 321 pp. 105. 6d. 

Text reproduced by photo-offset from the original Chatto 

and Windus setting. 
Four Square edition, London, Landsborough Publications 

Limited, April 1959. 223 pp. 25. 6rf. 

3. Sanctuary 1931 

sanctuary / By / William Faulkner / London / Chatto and 
Windus / 1931 

Red cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained gray. 
Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 4 7/8 inches. Dust 
jacket light gray, lettered in red and blue and decorated in 
blue. 

102 



[A] 2 B-U 8 X 6 [Y] 2 . Pp. [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by author; 
[iii] title-page, as above; [iv] copyright page; 1-316 text; 
[317-320] ads. (Colophon at foot of 316.) 

Publication date, 10 September, 1931. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 
14 Sept.) 2000 copies. 75. 6d. 

note: I have seen a copy in rose cloth, stamped in black on spine, the 
top edges unstained, and without the ads. There is no indication that the 
sheets are other than those of the first impression; nor, if so, whether this 
copy represents an earlier state of the binding or a later one. 

Later impressions and editions: 

Phoenix Library (Chatto and Windus "cheap edition"), Feb- 
ruary 1933. 315 pp. 35. 6d. Text reproduced by photo-offset 
from the original Chatto and Windus setting (omitting the 
number of the final page). 

"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, February 1952. 254 
pp. 8s. 6d. Printed in Sweden. A 1957 impression is printed 
in England. 

Penguin edition, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books Ltd., Feb- 
ruary 1953. 252 pp. 25. 

4. Sartor is 1932 
A Novel / SARTORIS / by / william faulkner / 1932 / chatto 

& WINDUS / LONDON 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained blue. 
Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 4 7/8 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered in blue and black, and decorated in blue. 

[A] 8 B-Z 8 AA 10 [BB] 2 . Pp. [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by author; 
[iii] title-page, as above; [iv] copyright page; [v] dedication; 
[vi] Contents; i-[38o] text; [381-382] colophon, verso blank; 
[383-386] ads. 

Publication date, 18 February, 1932. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 
24 Feb.) 2000 copies. 75. 6d. Text reproduced by photo-offset 
from the American setting (New York, Harcourt, Brace, 1929). 

note: I have seen only two copies of the book in which the two conjugate 
leaves of ads appeared as described above, i.e., properly inserted at the end, 
between the final leaf of signature AA (the colophon and its verso) and 
the back free end paper. In six other copies, including the copyright deposit 
copies at the Scottish National Library, the Bodleian, and the British 
Museum, the ads were inserted between the last page of the text and the 

103 



colophon. This binding variant was noted in the fall, 1932 catalogue of 
the Casanova Bookshop, Milwaukee, which stated that in "most" copies 
the ads were correctly inserted following the colophon. There seems little 
point in attempting to assign priority to either variant, despite the fact 
that all three copyright deposit copies examined were the same in this 
respect, as the variation might have taken place either accidentally or on 
purpose at any time during the period when the sheets were being bound up. 

Later impressions: 

Centaur Library, Chatto and Windus, September 1933. f,s. 6d. 

note: The only copy I have examined appears to consist of sheets of the 
first impression, bound in tan cloth, the top edges unstained, and with the 
dust jacket having a Centaur Library label pasted on the spine. The 
original price has been cut from the flap of the dust jacket, and the label 
gives the price as 35. 6d. The ads (inserted after the colophon) mention 
As I Lay Dying, which was not published until 1935. A Chatto and 
Windus file copy, similarly bound, has a label pasted to its dust jacket 
identifying it as a "Cheap Edition" but not Centaur Library, and with the 
price 45. 6<2. 

"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, 1954. 379 pp. 105. 6d. 
Text reproduced by photo-offset. 

5. Light in August 1933 
light in / august / William I Faulkner / 1933 / chatto & 

WINDUS / LONDON 

Brown cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained 
brown. Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 8 1/8X5 */4 inches. 
Dust jacket white, lettered and decorated in black. 

[A] 8 B-Z 8 AA-FF 8 GG 10 . Pp. [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by 
author; [iii] title-page, as above; [iv] copyright page; 1-480 
text. (Colophon at foot of p. 480.) 

Publication date, 26 January, 1933. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 
8 Feb.) 2500 copies. 85. 6d. Text reproduced from the Amer- 
ican setting (New York, Smith and Haas, 1932) by photo- 
offset. 

Later impressions and editions: 

Phoenix Library (Chatto and Windus "cheap edition"), Novem- 
ber 1934. 480 pp. 35. 6d. 

"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, July 1952. 479 pp. 
125. 6d. Text reproduced by photo-offset (omitting the num- 
ber from the final page). 

104 



Penguin edition, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books Ltd., Nov. 
i960. 380 pp. Not examined. 

6. These Thirteen 1933 

these thirteen / stories / by / William Faulkner / 1933 / 

CHATTO & WINDUS / LONDON 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained green. 
7 7/16 X 4 3/4 inches. Dust jacket white, lettered and deco- 
rated in black and green. 

[A] 8 B-Z 8 [AA] 2 . (The final two conjugate leaves of ads are in- 
serted between the last page of text and the blank last leaf 
of gathering Z in all six copies so far examined.) Pp. [i] half- 
title; [ii] list of books by author; [iii] title-page as above; 
[iv] copyright page; [v-vi] dedication, verso blank; [vii-viii] 
Contents, verso blank; [1-2] fly-title, verso blank; 3-[358] 
text; [359-362] ads; [363-364] blank. (Colophon at foot of 
P- [358].) ' 

Publication date, 21 September, 1933. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 
28 Sept.) 1500 copies. 75. 6d. Text reproduced from the Amer- 
ican setting (New York, Cape and Smith, 1931) by photo- 
offset. 

Contents: the contents are the same as in the original American 
text. 

Later impression: 

Chatto and Windus "cheap edition," October 1938. 35. 6d. Not 

examined. 
[See also No. 23, Vol. II of the Collected Short Stories, 1958.] 

7. Doctor Martino 1934 

doctor martino / and other stories I By I William Faulkner / 
London / chatto & windus / 1934 

Orange cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained red. 
Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 4 3/4 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered in red. 

[A] 8 B-Z 8 AA 8 [BB] 2 . (The final 2 conjugate leaves of ads are 
inserted between the last two leaves of signature [BB], i.e. 

105 



between the last page of the text and the blank final leaf.) 
Pp. [i-ii] blank; [iii] half-title; [iv] list of books by author; 
[v] title-page, as above; [vi] copyright page; [vii-viii] Contents, 
verso blank; [ix-x] acknowledgments, verso blank; [i]-37 1 
text; [372] blank; [373-376] ads; [377-378] blank. (Colophon 
at foot of p. 371.) 

Publication date, September, 1934. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 19 
Sept.) 1500 copies. 75. 6d. Text reproduced by photo-offset 
from the American setting (New York, Smith and Haas, 

J 934)- 

Contents: the contents are the same as in the original American 
text. 

note: The copyright deposit copy at the British Museum is actually a 
copy of the original American edition (New York, 1934), with a printed 
slip bearing the name of the English publisher pasted, on the title-page, over 
the American. 

Later impression: 

Chatto and Windus "cheap edition," September 1934. Not 

examined. 
[See also No. 24, Vol. Ill of the Collected Short Stories, 1959.] 

8. Pylon 1935 

PYLON / A Novel / BY / WILLIAM FAULKNER / 1935 / CHATTO & 
WINDUS / LONDON 

Rose-brown cloth, stamped in white on spine. Top edges 
stained rose. Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 4 3/4 
inches. Dust jacket white, lettered and decorated in blue 
and black. 

[A] 4 B-X 8 [Y] 2 . Pp. [i-ii] blank; [iii] half-title; [iv] list of books 
by author; [v] title-page, as above; [vi] copyright page; vii- 
[viii] Contents, verso blank; i-[3ig] text; [320] blank; [321- 
324] ads. (Colophon at foot of p. [319].) 

Publication date, March 25, 1935. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 9 
April.) 2900 copies. 75. 6d. 

Later impressions and editions: 

Centaur Library (Chatto and Windus "cheap edition"), Sep- 
tember 1936. 35. 6d. 

106 



note: The one copy I have examined, in the library of Mr. Faulkner, 
appeared identical to the first edition save in the following respects: the 
binding was a darker reddish-brown, the top edges were unstained, the 
bottom edges were trimmed, and on the spine of the dust jacket was pasted 
a Centaur Library label, with the price %s. 6d. It is highly questionable 
whether the cloth, the stain, and the bottom trim are points which determine 
if the book were issued in the Centaur Library, since the only direct 
evidence — the altered dust jacket — is not an integral part of the book. A 
copy in the Massey collection lacks the staining and has the bottom edges 
trimmed, but the cloth is of a lighter hue than the Faulkner copy, the 
dust jacket bears no Centaur Library label, and the final two conjugate 
leaves of ads are missing. Conceivably both the Faulkner and Massey copies 
represent sheets of the first impression, bound up later than the original 
issue represented by the copyright deposit copies, the one issued in Centaur 
Library when the decision was made to get rid of unsold copies by lower- 
ing the price, and the other, which was possibly bound up at the same time, 
either sold earlier at the original price, or possibly sold at the lower price 
but without the identifying label. It is also possible that it once bore such 
a label which has been now lost. The printing history noted on the copy- 
right page of the 1950 Holiday Library edition makes no mention of a second 
impression of the original edition, additional evidence that the "cheap 
edition" consisted of sheets or copies from the first impression. 

Holiday Library edition, John Lehmann, October 1950, 230 

pp. 6s. 
New Phoenix Library, Chatto and Windus, 1954, 230 pp. 6s. 

Text apparently printed from the same plates as the Holiday 

Library edition. 
"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, 1955. 230 pp. 8s. 6d. 

Text apparently printed from the same plates as the two 

preceding entries. 

9. As I Lay Dying 1935 

as 1 / lay dying / By / William Faulkner / London / Chatto 
& Windus / 1935 

Blue cloth, lettered in white on spine. Top edges stained blue. 
Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 4 3/4 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered in blue. 

[A] 4 B-Q 8 R 4 [S] 2 . Pp. [i-ii] blank; [iii] half-title; [iv] list of books 
by author; [v] title-page, as above; [vi] copyright page; [vii- 
viii] dedication, verso blank; 1-248 text; [249-252] ads. (Col- 
ophon at foot of p. 248.) 

Publication date, 26 September, 1935. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 
8 Oct.) 1500 copies. 75. 6d. 

107 



Later impressions: 

Chatto and Windus "cheap edition," October 1938. 35. 6d. Not 

examined. 
"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, May 1952. 248 pp. 

8s. 6d. Text reproduced from the original Chatto and Windus 

setting by photo-offset. 

10. Absalom, Absalom! 1937 

William Faulkner / Absalom, Absalom! [in red] / Chatto & 
Windus I London 

[on copyright page:] Copyright, 1936, by William Faulkner 

Cream cloth, lettered in red and decorated in red and black 
on front cover and spine. Top edges stained red. 8 1/16 X 
51/4 inches. No copy in dust jacket yet examined, but two 
copies in the library of Mr. Faulkner had what appeared to 
be jacket flaps, which were held inside the covers by glassine 
wrappers. 

[1-24] 8 . Pp. [1] half-title; [2] list of books by author; [3] 
title-page, as above; [4] copyright page, including the 
above (identical to original American issue); [5-6] fly-title, 
verso blank; 7-384 text (including appended Chronology 
and Genealogy); between final leaf of last signature and the 
back free endpaper is a tipped-in leaf, folded, with a map 
of Yoknapatawpha County. 

Publication date, 11 February, 1937. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 
12 Feb.) 1750 copies (sheets imported from America). 85. 6d. 

Later impressions: 

Chatto and Windus "cheap edition," February 1938. 35. 6d. 

note: A copy in the Massey collection, in other respects apparently 
identical to the copyright deposit copies described above, lacks the staining 
on the top edges, and may possibly represent a later binding-up of the 
sheets which was issued at a lower price. On the other hand, it may rep- 
resent a binding variant which was produced at the same time or even 
before the copyright deposit copies. A file copy in the Chatto and Windus 
Library also lacks the top staining, but as the front cover bears no title 
or ornaments, it is quite likely to represent only an advance copy sent to the 
publisher by the binder for approval. 

108 



"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, September i960. 384 
pp. 155. Text reproduced from the original setting by photo- 
offset. Not examined. 

11. The Unvanquished 1938 
the / unvanquished / [swelled rule] I William Faulkner / 

LONDON / CHATTO & WINDUS / 1938 

Pale blue cloth, with pale blue lettering showing against irreg- 
ular black ground on front cover and spine. Top edges 
stained purple. Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 1/2X4 3/4 
inches. No copy in dust jacket yet examined. 

[A] 4 B-X 8 . Pp. [i-ii] blank; [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by 
author; [iii] title-page, as above; [iv] copyright page; v-[vi] 
Contents, verso blank; 1-319 text; [320] colophon. 

Publication date, 12 May, 1938. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 20 
May.) 1750 copies. 75. 6d. 

Later impressions and editions: 

Penguin edition, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books Ltd., May 

J 955- 19 1 PP- M- 6d - 
"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, September i960. 319 
pp. 125. 6d. Text reproduced from the original Chatto and 
Windus setting by photo-offset. 

12. The Wild Palms 1939 
the / wild palms / By / William Faulkner / 1939 / chatto & 

WINDUS / LONDON 

Vari-toned cloth, separated by narrow band of dark green, 
the upper part white and blue mixture lettered in green on 
spine, the lower part green lettered in white on spine. Top 
edges stained green. Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 
43/4 inches. Dust jacket green and yellow, lettered in yel- 
low and green. 

[A] 2 B-U 8 X 6 . Pp. [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by author; 
[iii] title-page, as above; [iv] copyright page; 1-315 text; [316] 
colophon. 

Publication date, 16 March, 1939. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 29 
March.) 2000 copies. 75. 6d. 

109 



Later impression: 

"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, February 1952. 314 
pp. 85. 6d. Printed in Sweden. The text is reproduced from 
the original Chatto and Windus setting by photo-offset (omit- 
ting the number of the final page). 

13. The Hamlet 1940 
the hamlet / a novel by / William Faulkner / 1940 / chatto & 

WINDUS / LONDON 

Yellow cloth, stamped in green on spine. Top edges stained 
yellow. Bottom edges rough-trimmed. 7 3/8 X 4 7/8 inches. 
Dust jacket yellow, lettered and decorated in green. 

[A]* B-Y 8 . Pp. [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by author; [iii] title- 
page, as above; [iv] copyright page; [v-vi] dedication, verso 
blank; vii-[viii] Contents, verso blank; [1-2] fly-title, verso 
blank; 3-333 text; [334] blank; [335-336] colophon, verso 
blank. 

Publication date, 12 September, 1940. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 28 
Sept.) 2000 copies. 85. 6d. 

Later impression: 

"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, January 1958. 333 pp. 
125. 6d. Reproduced by photo-offset from the original English 
setting. 

14. Go Down, Moses 1942 

go down, moses / And Other Stories I by I william faulkner / 
1942 / Chatto & Windus / London [the whole enclosed in chain 
design between two thin lines with a third line, thicker, at the 
outer edge] 

Green cloth, stamped in white on spine. 8X5 1/4 inches. Dust 
jacket pinkish-white, lettered in dark green. 

[A] 8 B-R 8 . Pp. [1] notice that book conforms to War Economy 
Standard; [2] list of books by author; [3] title-page, as above; 
[4] copyright page; [5] Contents; [6] dedication; 7^269] text; 
[270] colophon; [271-272] blank. 

Publication date, 8 October, 1942. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 20 
Oct.) 2500 copies, qs. 

110 



Later editions and impressions: 

Penguin edition, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books Ltd., 1960. 
288 pp. 35. 6d. 

"Uniform Edition," Chatto and Windus, September i960. 268 
pp. 125. 6d. Text reproduced from the original Chatto and 
Windus setting by photo-offset. 

15. Intruder in the Dust 1949 
intruder / in the dust / A Novel by / William Faulkner / 

1949 / CHATTO & WINDUS / LONDON 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained blue- 
green. 8 1/8X5 3/8 inches. Dust jacket white, lettered in 
black, and decorated in yellow, green, blue, and black. 

[A] 8 B-P 8 Q 6 . Pp. [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by author; [iii] 
title-page, as above; [iv] copyright page; [1-2] fly-title, verso 
blank; 3-247 text; [248] colophon. 

Publication date, 29 September, 1949. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 
24 Oct.) 2000 copies. Text reproduced from the American set- 
ting (New York, Random House, 1948) by photo-offset, gs. 6d. 

Later edition: 

Penguin edition, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books Ltd., Nov. 
i960. 237 pp. 35. 6d. 

16. Knight's Gambit 1951 
knight's / gambit / Six Stories by / william faulkner / 1951 

/ CHATTO & WINDUS / LONDON 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained light 
blue. 7 7/8 X 5 inches. Dust jacket white, lettered in black, 
decorated in blue, gray, and black, lettered in gray against 
black ground, lettered in black against gray ground, and 
with white lettering showing against blue and gray grounds. 

[1] 8 2-14 8 . The front and back endpapers are the pasted-down 
first leaf of the first signature and last leaf of the last signa- 
ture, and are not included in the following collation. Pp. 
[1-2] blank; [3] half-title; [4] list of books by author; [5] 
title-page, as above; [6] copyright page; [7-8] Contents, verso 
blank; 9-218 text; [219-220] blank. 

Ill 



Publication date, 16 April, 1951. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 5 
May.) 4000 copies. 95. 6d. Recommended by the Book Society. 

Contents: the contents are the same as in the original American 
text. 

17. Collected Stories 1951 

Collected Stories of / william faulkner / 1951 / chatto & 
windus / London [the first two lines against a blue ground] 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. Top edges stained light 
blue. 8 1/4X5 1/2 inches. Dust jacket white, lettered in 
blue, and with white lettering showing against blue ground. 

[1] 8 [2-29] 16 . Pp. [i] half-title; [ii] list of books by author; [iii] 
title-page, as above; [iv] copyright page; [v-vi] Contents; 
[1-2] fly-title, verso blank; 3-900 text; [901-906] blank. 

Publication date, 18 October, 1951. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 30 
Oct.) 1526 copies (sheets imported from America). 255. 

Contents: the contents are the same as in the original American 
text. 

Later impressions: See Nos. 22, 23, and 24, Vols. I, II, and III of 
the Collected Short Stories. 

18. Requiem for a Nun 1953 
william faulkner / [ornamented rule] / Requiem for a Nun / 

1953 / CHATTO & WINDUS / LONDON 

Pale blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. 7 1/4X47/8 inches. 
Dust jacket white, lettered in black and with white lettering 
showing against black ground, and decorated in yellow and 
black. 

[A] 8 B-Q 8 . Pp. [1] half-title; [2] list of books by author; [3] title- 
page, as above; [4] copyright page; [5-6] Contents, verso 
blank; [7-8] fly-title, verso blank; 9-251 text; [252] blank; 
[253] colophon; [254-256] blank. 

Publication date, 9 February, 1953. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 18 
Feb.) 5500 copies. 1 15. 6d. 

Later edition: 

Penguin edition, Harmondsworth, Penguin Books Ltd., i960. 

239 PP- 3^- 6rf - 

112 



19. A Fable 1955 
a / fable J By I William Faulkner / 1955 / chatto & windus / 

LONDON 

Red cloth, stamped in gold on spine. 7 3/4 X 5 1/8 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered in black and red; and lettered in black 
and with white lettering and decorations showing against red 
ground. 

[A] 16 B-M 16 N 4 . Pp. [1] half-title; [2] list of works by author; 
[3] title-page, as above; [4] copyright page; [5-6] dedication, 
verso blank; [7-8] acknowledgments, verso blank; g-[392] 
text. (Colophon at foot of p. [392].) 

Publication date, 9 June, 1955. (Acq. date, SNL copy, 23 Aug.) 
13,160 copies. 155. Recommended by the Book Society. 

20. Faulkner's County 1955 
Faulkner's County / Tales of / Yoknapatawpha County / by / 

WILLIAM FAULKNER / 1955 / CHATTO & WINDUS / LONDON 

Green cloth, stamped on spine in gold and in gold against 
brown ground. 73/4X5 inches. Dust jacket off-white, let- 
tered in green and red. 

[1-14] 16 [15] 12 [16] 16 . Pp. [i-ii] half-title, verso blank; [iii] title- 
page, as above; [iv] copyright page; [v-vi] Contents, verso 
blank; [vii-viii] Nobel Prize address; [1-2] fly-title, verso 
blank; 3-494 text; [495-496] blank. 

Publication date, 11 July, 1955. 5000 copies. 155. 

Contents: contains the Nobel Prize address; As I Lay Dying; "The 
Bear" (from Go Down, Moses); "Spotted Horses" (from The 
Hamlet); "A Rose for Emily"; "Barn Burning"; "Dry Septem- 
ber"; "That Evening Sun"; "Turnabout"; "Shingles for the 
Lord"; "A Justice"; "Wash"; "Percy Grimm" (episode from 
Light in August); and "The Courthouse" (Act I, with its nar- 
rative prologue, from Requiem for a Nun). 

21. The Town 1958 
the town / [ornament] / William Faulkner / 1958 / chatto 

AND WINDUS / LONDON 

113 



Orange-brown cloth, stamped in gold on spine. 7 3/4 X 5 3/16 
inches. Dust jacket cream, lettered and decorated in brown 
and black. 

[A] 16 B-K 16 . Pp. [1] publisher's note; [2] list of books by author; 
[3] title-page, as above; [4] copyright page; [5-6] dedication, 
verso blank; [7]-3ig text; [320] colophon. 

Publication date, 30 January, 1958. 10,000 copies. 16s. Recom- 
mended by the Book Society. 

22. Collected Short Stories, Vol. I 1958 

uncle willy / and other stories / Volume One of the / Collected 
Short Stories / of / william faulkner / 1958 / chatto & 

WINDUS / LONDON 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. 73/4X5 1/8 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered and decorated in blue and red, and 
with white lettering showing against red and blue grounds. 

[A] 8 B-U 8 . Pp. [1-2] blank; [3] half-title; [4] list of books by 
author; [5] title-page, as above; [6] copyright page; [7-8] 
Contents, verso blank; 9-320 text. 

Publication date, 24 March, 1958. 6000 copies. 155. 

Contents: contains "Shingles for the Lord," "The Tall Men," "A 
Bear Hunt," "Two Soldiers," "Shall Not Perish," "Centaur in 
Brass," "Uncle Willy," "Mule in the Yard," "That Will Be 
Fine," "A Courtship," "Pennsylvania Station," "Artist at 
Home," "The Brooch," "My Grandmother Millard and Gen- 
eral Bedford Forrest and the Battle of Harrykin Creek," and 
"Golden Land." 

23. Collected Short Stories, Vol. II 1958 
these thirteen / Volume Two of the / Collected Short Stories / 

Of / WILLIAM FAULKNER / 1958 / CHATTO 8c WINDUS / LONDON 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. 7 11/16 X 5 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered and decorated in purple and orange, 
and with white lettering showing against purple and orange 
grounds. 

[A] 8 B-I 16 . Pp. [1-2] blank; [3] half-title; [4] list of works by 

114 



author; [5] title-page, as above; [6] copyright page; [7-8] 
Contents, verso blank; 9-272 text. 

Publication date, 18 September, 1958. 155. Text reproduced 
by photo-offset from the Collected Stories. 

Contents: the contents are the same as in the original English issue 
(1933)- 

24. Collected Short Stories, Vol. Ill 1959 

dr martino / and other stories / Volume Three of the / 
Collected Short Stories / of / william faulkner / 1958 / 

CHATTO 8c WINDUS / LONDON 

Blue cloth, stamped in gold on spine. 7 11/16 X 5 1/8 inches. 
Dust jacket white, lettered and decorated in green and red, 
and with white lettering showing against green and red 
grounds. 

[A] 16 B-H 16 [I] 16 K 16 . Pp. [1-2] blank; [3] half-title; [4] list of 
works by author; [5] title-page, as above; [6] copyright page; 
[7-8] Contents, verso blank; [9J-320 text. 

Publication date, 5 February, 1959. 155. Text reproduced by 
photo-offset from the Collected Stories. 

Contents: the contents are the same as in the original English 
issue (1934), save that "Lo!" and "Barn Burning" replace 
"The Hound" and "Smoke," which had in the meantime 
been incorporated into The Hamlet and Knight's Gambit, 
respectively. 

25. New Orleans Sketches 1959 

NEW ORLEANS / SKETCHES / WILLIAM FAULKNER / INTRODUCTION 
BY CARVEL COLLINS / SIDGWICK AND JACKSON LIMITED / LONDON 

[on copyright page:] First published in this edition 1959 

Issued simultaneously in both black and tan boards (with imi- 
tation cloth grain), stamped in gold on spine. 7 1/4X4 7/8 
inches. Dust jacket white, lettered in black, and lettered in 
white and decorated in black against yellow ground. 

[i] 16 2-4 16 [5] 16 6-7 16 . Pp. [1-2] half-title, verso blank; [3] title- 
page, as above; [4] copyright page, including above; [5-6] 

115 



Contents; [7-8] fly-title, verso blank; 9-34 introduction; [35- 
36] fly-title, verso blank; 37-223 text; [224] blank. 

Publication date, 15 May, 1959. 155. Text reproduced by photo- 
offset from the Rutgers University Press edition. 

26. The Mansion 1961 
The Mansion / [ornament] / William Faulkner / 1961 / chatto 

AND WINDUS / LONDON 

Orange boards (imitation cloth grain), stamped in gold on 
spine. Top edges stained orange. 7 5/8 X 5 1/8 inches. Dust 
jacket white, lettered in black and green; lettered in blue and 
black against black, blue, and green grounds, and with white 
lettering showing against blue and green grounds. 

A-M 16 N 8 . Pp. [1] publisher's note; [2] list of works by author; 
[3] title-page, as above; [4] copyright page; [5-6] dedication, 
verso blank; [7-8] Contents, verso blank; [9-10] author's note, 
verso blank; [11-12] fly-title, verso blank; 13-399 text > [4°°] 
blank. 

Publication date, 12 January, 1961. 215. 

note: I have examined only two copies of this book. 

II. Published in Other Countries: 

A. FRANCE 

Sanctuary. Paris: Crosby Continental Editions, 1932. 308 pp. 
Wrappers. [Only three copies examined.] 

B. GERMANY 

Pylon. Hamburg, Paris, Bologna: Albatross Verlag, 1935. 243 pp. 
Wrappers, with dust jacket. [Only one copy examined.] 

The Unvanquished. Leipzig, Paris, Bologna: Albatross Verlag, 
1938. 252 pp. Wrappers, with dust jacket. [Only one copy ex- 
amined.] 

The Unvanquished. Bielefeld, Berlin, Hannover: Velhagen & 
Klasing, [1957]. 47 pp. Wrappers. No. 22 in a series of English 
and American readings edited by Friedrich Lange. With a fore- 
word and notes. (Excerpts from chapters one, three, and four 
of the book.) [Only one copy examined.] 

116 



The Bear. Paderborn: Verlag Ferdinand Schoningh, 1958. 15 pp. 
Wrappers. No. 134 in a series of English-language readings. With 
an afterword and notes by Alex Niederstenbruch. (Brief ex- 
cerpts from the 1942 version in Go Down, Moses.) [Only two 
copies examined.] 

The Bear. Verden/ Alien Silva-Verlag, 1959. 96 pp. Wrappers. No. 
24 in a series of English-language school texts. With an Intro- 
duction and Notes by Paul Fussell. (Text reprinted from the 
1955 version in Big Woods.) 

C. JAPAN 

A Rose for Emily and Other Stories. Tokyo: Kairyudo, 1956. 141 
pp. Wrappers, with dust jacket. No. 5 in Kairyudo's Mentor 
Library. Edited, with an introduction and notes, by Kenzaburo 
Ohashi. (Contains "A Rose for Emily," "That Evening Sun," 
"Dry September," and "Red Leaves.") [Only one copy ex- 
amined.] 

The Unvanquished. Tokyo: Kairyudo, 1957. 114 pp. Wrappers, 
with dust jacket. No. 7 in Kairyudo's Mentor Library. Edited, 
with an introduction and notes, by Katsuji Takamura. (Con- 
tains only chapters three and seven from the book.) [Only one 
copy examined.] 

W. Faulkner's Short Stories and Speeches. Tokyo: Kaibunsha, 1957. 
66 pp. Wrappers, with dust jacket. Edited, with an introduction 
and notes, by Shuichi Motoda. (Contains "A Rose for Emily," 
the Nobel Prize Address, "To the Youth of Japan," and 
"Wash.") [Only two copies examined.] 

D. SWEDEN 

The Wild Palms. Stockholm, London: Continental Book Com- 
pany, 1945. 314 pp. Wrappers, with dust jacket. Vol. 68 in the 
Zephyr Books Library of British and American authors. [Only 
two copies examined.] 

Sanctuary. Stockholm, London: Continental Book Company, 1947. 
254 pp. Wrappers, with dust jacket. Vol. 120 in the Zephyr 
Books Library of British and American authors. [Only two 
copies examined.] 



117 



PART FOUR 
THE TRANSLATIONS 



Introduction 



I. List of Books by Faulkner Which Have Been Translated 



II. Check List of Translations 

1 . Argentina 

2. Belgium 

3. Brazil 

4. Chile 

5. Czechoslovakia 

6. Denmark 

7. Finland 

8. France 

9. Germany 

10. Greece 

11. Holland 

12. Hungary 

13. Iceland 

14. Iran 

15. Italy 



16. Japan 

17. Korea 

18. Lebanon 

19. Mexico 

20. Norway 

21. Poland 

22. Portugal 

23. Rumania 

24. Russia 

25. Spain 

26. Sweden 

27. Switzerland 

28. Turkey 

29. Yugoslavia 



INTRODUCTION 

This check list of Faulkner translations I offer unhappily, and 
with apologies. The unhappiness can be attributed to the fact 
that though such a list was needed, for several years I have been 
hoping that someone else would undertake it, and no one has 
proved foolish enough to do so. The apologies are for the fact 
that the list is quite certainly both incomplete and inaccurate. 

When I began, in the spring of 1956, to compile a check list 
of Faulkner's writings, I quickly (and, I now know, correctly) 
decided that to include the translations would add more to the 
labor than to the value of the project. Translations are an index 
to an author's popularity, they are vital to the study of literary 
influences, they may just possibly shed light upon obscure pas- 
sages in the original, 1 and they may well include valuable in- 
troductions — if written by the translator, at any rate, one is 
assured of reading criticism by someone who has a closer knowl- 
edge of the text than do most critics who have written about 
Faulkner. But no bibliography of translations can conform to 
even the most lenient standards of bibliographic completeness, 
much less accuracy, unless the compiler has an extraordinary com- 
bination of linguistic competence and the time and means for 
sufficient travel to examine multiple copies of many translations. 

This check list, then, is offered, with all its deficiencies in com- 
pleteness and accuracy, merely as a contribution toward a bib- 
liography of Faulkner translations. The twenty-nine countries 
where translations have been published are listed alphabetically; 
under each country, the main entry for each translation appears 
alphabetically according to the original English title. For some 
countries the dual rendering of original and translated title may 
seem superfluous, but I hope that the practice will justify itself 
on the whole. As a table of contents and cross reference to these 
main entries, a preliminary table lists alphabetically the titles 
of all Faulkner's books which have been translated, each followed 
by a chronological list of the countries where translations have 
appeared. Unfortunately, where two or more translations ap- 

1 An example is the French translation of The Sound and the Fury by Maurice 
E. Coindreau. As Professor Coindreau indicates in his Preface, he worked closely 
with Faulkner himself upon the translation. I should add, however, that this is 
the only case which has come to my attention where Faulkner has taken any 
part in the process of translating his books. 

123 



peared the same year, I have not obtained sufficient data to 
determine the proper chronological order, and therefore within 
each year, the order is merely alphabetical. 

The main entry for each translation includes the original title, 
the translated title (occasionally in somewhat shortened form), 
the name of the translator, the place and date of publication, 
the pagination, and notice of the presence of additional matter 
like introductions and illustrations. Since I have been able to 
examine only about half the translations listed, and of those ex- 
amined was able to see only one copy of the majority, it was not 
possible to adhere to any general standard of description which 
might have made it easier for the user of this list to distinguish 
between various impressions or issues by the presence or absence 
of certain information on the title page. Therefore there is no 
certainty that a date of publication or name of translator or even 
name of publisher, as given here, appears upon the title-page 
or any other page of the translation described. Further, though 
I have given, where possible, the number of the last numbered 
page of each book, it is fairly certain that in some of the cases 
where I have relied upon information supplied by others, a 
method of description has been followed which supplied in- 
ferred numbers. For such discrepancies in the format, as well 
as the errors, I ask the reader's indulgence, and welcome his 
corrections. 

No attempt has been made to list impressions subsequent to 
the first, or the binding variants and different issues of the 
original editions described. Gallimard, for example, has com- 
monly published its translations of Faulkner into French in 
multiple issues, and several countries have released what appear 
to be the same sheets in both wrappers and in cloth — whether 
simultaneously or not I do not know. Nor have I attempted to 
include translations which appeared in foreign periodicals, or 
in anthologies of work by several authors. These problems call 
for final resolution, I believe, by individuals working within the 
countries of origin of the translations. 2 I have noted later edi- 

2 For a fine example of what can be done along such lines, see Stanley D. 
Woodworth's list of periodical appearances of Faulkner translations in his William 
Faulkner en France (1931-1952), Paris, 1959. I know of no other such listing. How- 
ever, as libraries in eight countries (Argentina, Belgium, Holland, Hungary, 
Poland, Portugal, Russia, and Sweden) were kind enough to include information 
about periodical and anthology appearances in their replies to my questions about 
books, I have deposited this correspondence in the Faulkner Collection of the 
Princeton University Library, where it can be consulted by anyone who wishes 
to pursue the subject beyond the scope of the present check list. 

124 



tions — i.e., new settings-up of type — whenever possible, but have 
noted later impressions of each edition only when there was 
evidence of a significant change — addition or omission of an 
introduction, or a change in publisher or place of publication 
that mioht cause confusion. 

In all, Faulkner has written twenty-eight books published in 
this country, counting as books the two separately published short 
stories (Idyll in the Desert and Miss Zilphia Gant), and the epi- 
sode in A Fable published earlier as Notes on a Horsethief. Of 
this total, twenty-three have been translated: all but The Marble 
Faun (his first book, a volume of verse), Notes on a Horsethief, 
Idyll in the Desert, Big Woods, and the recently published The 
Mansion. Several of these gaps are likely to be soon filled: the 
translation rights to Big Woods have been secured in Japan, foi 
Idyll in the Desert in Italy, and for The Mansion in Italy, Sweden, 
and Switzerland. 

These translations have appeared in twenty-nine countries. As 
might be expected, France leads with a total of twenty books 
translated — I count here only those translations which were orig- 
inal books by Faulkner, not the various combinations and col- 
lections made by foreign publishers without regard for the original 
form of the works. Italy follows with seventeen. Surprisingly 
enough, Argentina is a close third, tied with Germany, at fifteen. 
To turn to the works translated, as might also be expected, 
Sanctuary leads in number of translations, with sixteen countries 
and thirteen languages. (Germany and Switzerland commonly 
share the same German translation. Argentina and Spain have 
occasionally shared the same translation, more often used different 
ones. Portugal and Brazil share a language but not, so far, any 
Faulkner translations.) Unexpectedly, The Wild Palms follows, 
with thirteen countries. Light in August appears in twelve. Many 
of the books have appeared in from four to eight countries, and 
indeed the spread of translations is a remarkable one. Transla- 
tions of A Fable and As I Lay Dying, for instance, have appeared 
in a total of nine countries each, but both novels have appeared 
in only four of them. It might be tempting to speculate upon 
what national variations in literary taste account for such discrep- 
ancies, but the passage of even a small amount of time is apt to 
change the evidence radically. The records of Faulkner's pub- 
lishers reveal that permissions have been obtained, some of them 
for many years, for many more books than have been translated, 
and the discrepancy between the date when permission was ac- 

125 



quired and the date when the translation appeared for not a 
few of the published books indicates how soon the picture may 
change. 

I have of necessity depended to an unusual degree upon the 
efforts of others in compiling this list. I am grateful to four col- 
lectors who made available to me their Faulkner translations, or 
corresponded with me about them: Carl Petersen, H. Richard 
Archer, James Bloom, and Linton Massey. Albert Erskine and 
Emmanuel Harper of Random House, Inc., Faulkner's publisher, 
made available records and many copies of the more recent 
translations. Mrs. Marguerite Cohn, of the House of Books, called 
attention to several recent translations I might otherwise have 
missed. Joe C. Rees, of the University of North Carolina Library 
School, did much of the preliminary work of consulting the an- 
nual volumes of the Index Translationum and the various national 
bibliographies, and assembling the data from other sources as 
it was added to the list. At the Princeton University Library, I 
am indebted to Alexander D. Wainwright, Noburu Hiraga, and 
Miss Katharine S. Pearce for their assistance in identifying and 
transliterating Japanese, Yugoslavian, and Russian names and 
titles. 

But my heaviest obligation is to these scholars and librarians 
in various foreign countries: Miss Laura Martinez of the Bib- 
lioteca Nacional in Buenos Aires; Dr. F. Rennhofer of the Oster- 
reichische Nationalbibliothek in Vienna; L. Danckaert, Librarian 
of the Bibliotheque Royale in Brussels; Miss Celuta Moreira 
Gomes of the Biblioteca Nacional in Rio de Janeiro; Ernesto Gal- 
liano of the Biblioteca Nacional in Santiago; Mrs. Lis Rigun of 
the Det Kgl. Bibliotek in Copenhagen; H. Sauget of the Societe 
des Amis de la Bibliotheque Nationale et des Grandes Bib- 
liotheques de France; H. Holme and Dr. Schaaf of the Deutsche 
Biicherei in Leipzig; Miss M. van Laarhoven of the Koninklijke 
Bibliotheek in The Hague; Dr. Alice Goriupp of the Bibliotheque 
Nationale Szechenyi in Budapest; Mansuino Carlo of Florence, 
Italy; I. Hatsukade of the National Diet Library in Tokyo; Dr. 
Manuel Alcala of the Biblioteca Nacional in Mexico City; Erling 
GrOnland of the Universitetsbiblioteket in Oslo; Dr. Bogdan 
Horodyski, Director of the Biblioteka Narodowa in Warsaw; 
Luisa Maria de Castro e Azevedo of the Biblioteca Nacional in 
Lisbon; V. Candea and Professor Gh. Vladescu-Racoasa of the 
Academiei Republicii Populare Romine in Bucharest; I. Rudo- 

126 



mino, Director of the Library of Foreign Literatures, Moscow; 
Justo Garcia Morales of the Biblioteca Nacional in Madrid; Olof 
von Feilitzen of the Kungl. Biblioteket in Stockholm; Cevat 
Capan of the Department of English, University of Istanbul; the 
Director of the Schweizerische Landesbibliothek in Berne; and 
Cedomir Minderovic of the Narodna Biblioteka in Belgrade. 
To my requests for information they responded patiently and 
carefully, though the demand for a complete list of translations 
into their languages was an imposition and the following corre- 
spondence often even more so. I can only thank them again, and 
acknowledge that this list would not have been possible without 
their assistance. 

I. List of Books by Faulkner Which Have Been Translated 

Absalom, Absalom!, 1936: Germany (1938); Argentina (1950); 
France (1953); Italy (1954); Japan (1958); Poland (1959). 

As I Lay Dying, 1930: France (1934); Argentina (1942); Sweden 
(1948); Finland (1952); Denmark (1954); Spain (1954); Hol- 
land (1955); Italy (1958); Japan (1959). 

Collected Stories, 1950: Poland (1958). See also under Doctor 
Marti no and These 75. 

Doctor Martino and Other Stories, 1934: France (1948). 

A Fable, 1954: Germany and Switzerland (1955); Mexico (1955); 
Spain (1955); Argentina (1956); Brazil (1956); Chile (1956); 
France (1958); Japan (1960). 

Go Down, Moses, 1942: Italy (1947); Germany* and Switzer- 
land* (1953); France (1955); Spain (1955). 

A Green Bough, 1933: France (1955); Germany* and Switzer- 
land* (1957). 

The Hamlet, 1940: Italy (1942); Argentina (1947); Spain (1953); 
Germany and Switzerland (1957); France (1959). 

Intruder in the Dust, 1948: Denmark (1950); Sweden (1950); 
Argentina (1951); Belgium and Holland (1951); Germany and 
Switzerland (1951); Italy (1951); Japan (1951); France (1952); 
Portugal (1952); Yugoslavia (1953); Czechoslovakia (1958). 

Knight's Gambit, 1949: Argentina (1951); France* (1951); Japan 
(1951); Denmark (1952). 

Light in August, 1932: Norway (1934); France (1935); Germany 
(1935); Czechoslovakia (1936); Holland (1938); Italy (1939); 

* Substantially the same, but part of contents omitted in translation. 

127 



Argentina (1942); Sweden (1944); Denmark (1946); Brazil 
(1948); Yugoslavia (Slovenian, 1952; Serbo-Croatian, 1953); 
Poland (1959). 

Miss Zilphia Gant, 1932: Italy (1959). 

Mosquitoes, 1927: France (1948); Argentina (1956); Italy (1957); 
Spain (1959). 

Pylon, 1935: Germany (1936); Italy (1937); France (1946); Spain 
(1947); Denmark (1952); Japan (1954). 

Requiem for a Nun, 1951: Argentina (1952); Sweden (1952); 
Italy (1955); France (acting version, 1956; original version, 
1957); Germany and Switzerland (1956; acting version, Ger- 
many only, 1956); Brazil (acting version, 1958); Portugal 

(1958). 

Sanctuary, 1931: France (1933); Spain (1934); Czechoslovakia 
(i935); Denmark (1942); Italy (1943); Argentina (1945); 
Brazil (1948); Japan (1950); Holland (1951); Norway (1951); 
Sweden (1951); Switzerland (1951); Germany (1953); Yugo- 
slavia (1953); Poland (1957); Portugal (1958). 

Sartoris, 1929: France (1937); Italy (1946); Argentina (1953); 
Sweden (1955); Portugal (1958). 

Soldiers' Pay, 1926: Norway (1932); France (1948); Japan (1951); 
Argentina (1953); Italy (1953); Spain (1954); Japan (1957); 
Germany (1958). 

The Sound and the Fury, 1929: France (1938); Argentina (1947); 
Italy (1947); Japan (1954); Germany and Switzerland (1956); 
Yugoslavia (1958). 

These 13, 1931: France (1939); Italy (1948); Argentina (1944* 
and 1956). 

The Town, 1957: Germany and Switzerland (1958); Sweden 
(1958); Yugoslavia (1959); Spain (i960). 

The Unvanquished, 1938: Holland (1938); Italy (1948); Sweden 
(1948); France (1949); Spain (1951); Germany and Switzer- 
land (1954); Iran (1956); Norway (1957); Czechoslovakia 
(1958); Portugal (i960). 

The Wild Palms, 1939: Denmark (1939); Argentina (1940); Fin- 
land (1947); Sweden (1949); Japan (1950); France (1952); 
Italy (1956); Germany and Switzerland (1957); Korea (1958); 
Poland (1958); Yugoslavia (1959); Czechoslovakia (i960). 



128 



II. Check List of Translations 
ARGENTINA 

Absalom, Absalom! 

jAbsalon, Absalon! tr. by Beatriz Florencia Nelson. Buenos Aires, 
Emece, 1950. 409 pp. With a short prefatory note by the trans- 
lator. 

As I Lay Dying 

Mientras yo agonizo, tr. by Max Dickmann. Buenos Aires, San- 
tiago Rueda, 1942. 267 pp. With a preface by the translator. 

A Fable 

Una fdbula, tr. by Antonio Ribera. Buenos Aires, Jackson, 1956. 
365 pp. With a preface by Agustin Bartra. 

The Hamlet 

El villorrio, tr. by Raquel W. de Ortiz. Buenos Aires, Futuro, 

1947- 3*2 pp. 

Intruder in the Dust 

Intruso en el polvo, tr. by Aida Aisenson. Buenos Aires, Losada, 

1951. 222 pp. 

Knight's Gambit 
Gambito de caballo, tr. by Lucrecia Moreno de Saenz. Buenos 

Aires, Emece, 1951. 263 pp. 

Light in August 
Luz de Agosto, tr. by Pedro Lecuona. Buenos Aires, Sur, 1942. 
434 pp. Also Buenos Aires, Goyanarte, 1957, 353 pp. 

Mosquitoes 
Mosquitos, tr. by Jeronimo Cordoba. Buenos Aires, Siglo Veinte, 
1956. 318 pp. 

Requiem for a Nun 
Requiem para una mujer, tr. by Jorge Zalamea. Buenos Aires, 
Emece, 1952. 225 pp. 

Sanctuary 
Santuario, tr. by Lino Novas Calvo. Buenos Aires, Espasa-Calpe, 
1945. 217 pp. With a preface by Antonio Marichalar. 

Sartoris 
Sartoris, tr. by Francisco Gurza. Buenos Aires, Schapire, 1953. 340 
pp. 

129 



Soldiers' Pay 
La paga de los soldados, tr. by Francisco Gurza. Buenos Aires, 
Schapire, 1953. 323 pp. 

The Sound and the Fury 
El sonido y la furia, tr. by Floreal Mazia. Buenos Aires, Futuro, 
1947. 230 pp. 

These 13 
Victoria y otros relatos, tr. by Jose Blaya Lozano. Buenos Aires, 
Corinto, 1944. 316 pp. Contains twelve of the thirteen stories, 
omitting "Carcassonne." 
Estos trece, tr. by Aurora Bernardez. Buenos Aires, Losada, 1956. 
265 pp. 

The Wild Palms 
Las palmeras salvajes, tr. by Jorge Luis Borges. Buenos Aires, 
Sudamericana, 1940. 365 pp. 

BELGIUM 

Intruder in the Dust 
Ongenode gast, tr. into Dutch by Apie Prins. Amsterdam and 
Antwerp, Wereld-Bibliotheek, 1951. 237 pp. (Published simul- 
taneously in Belgium and Holland.) 

BRAZIL 

A Fable 
Uma fdbula, tr. by Olivia Krahenbuhl. Sao Paulo and Rio de 
Janeiro, Merito, 1956. 410 pp. With a preface by the translator. 

Light in August 
Luz de Agosto, tr. by Berenice Xavier. Rio de Janeiro, Porto 
Alegre, Globo, 1948. 348 pp. 

Requiem for a Nun 
Oracao para uma negra, tr. by Guilherme Figueiredo. Rio de 
Janeiro, Agir, 1958. 159 pp. (Translated from the Camus adap- 
tation.) 

Sanctuary 

Santudrio, tr. by Ligia Junqueira Smith. Sao Paulo, Instituto 
Progresso, 1948. 300 pp. 

130 



CHILE 

A Fable 
Una Fdbula, tr. by Antonio Ribera. Santiago, Circulo Literario, 
1956. 365 pp. With an introduction by Agustin Bartra. 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

Intruder in the Dust 
Neodpocivej v pokoji, tr. by Jifi Valja. Prague, Nase Vojsko, 1958. 
177 pp. With an afterword by Dr. Libuse Bubenikova. 

Light in August 
Srpnove Svcllo, tr. by Vilem Werner. Prague, Nakladatelske 
druzstvo Maje, 1936. 357 pp. 

Sanctuary 
Svatyne, tr. by Z. Wattersonova. Prague, Kvasnicka a Hampl, 1935. 
268 pp. 

The Unvanquished 
Nepfemozetu. tr. by Josef Schwarz. Prague, Nase Vojsko, 1958. 
167 pp. 

The Wild Palms 
Divoke palmy, tr. by Jifi Valja. Prague, Mlada Fronta, 1960. 288 
pp. With illustrations by Vladimir Fuka, and an afterword by 
the translator. 

twenty stories 
Rule pro Ernilii, tr. by Josef Schwarz and Zdenek Urbanek. Prague, 
Statni Nakladatelstvi, 1958. 383 pp. Contains an afterword by 
Vitezslav Kocourek, "Lo!," "Mountain Victory," "Wash," 
"Barn Burning," "A Rose for Emily," "That Will Be Fine," 
"That Evening Sun," "Dry September," "A Bear Hunt," "Elly," 
"The Brooch," "Pennsylvania Station," "Golden Land," 
"Crevasse," "Ad Astra," "Victory," "Turnabout," "The Tall 
Men," "Two Soldiers," and "Shall Not Perish." 

DENMARK 

As I Lay Dying 
/ min sidste time, tr. by Gunnar Juel-J0rgensen. Copenhagen, 
Carit Andersen, 1954. 172 pp. 

131 



Intruder in the Dust 

Ubuden gaest i st0vet, tr. by Mogens Boisen. Copenhagen, Asche- 
houg, 1950. 277 pp. 

Knight's Gambit 
H0je ret!, tr. by Georg Gjedde. Copenhagen, Wangel, 1952. 240 pp. 

Light in August 
Lys i August, tr. by Sven M0ller Kristensen. Copenhagen, Athe- 
naeum, 1946. 456 pp. 

Pylon 
Trekanten, tr. by Peter Toubro. Copenhagen, F0nss, 1952. 231 pp. 
(I am informed that the original issue bore no date, and that 
later in 1952, F0nss Forlag was taken over by Winthers Forlag, 
which reissued the book the same year.) 

Sanctuary 
Det allerhelligste, tr. by Sven M0ller Kristensen. Copenhagen, 
Athenaeum, 1942. 272 pp. 

The Wild Palms 
De vilde palmer, tr. by Niels Haislund and Sven M0ller Kristen- 
sen. Copenhagen, Athenaeum, 1939. 308 pp. Also Copenhagen, 
Gyldendal, 1959, 237 pp., with an introduction by Harald 
Engberg. 

The Nobel Prize address 
William Faulkners Nobelpristale, tr. by Kay Nielsen. Copen- 
hagen, Aschehoug, 1951. (Two leaves, without pagination.) 

"The Bear" (from Go Down, Moses) 
Bj0rnen, tr. by Ole Storm. Copenhagen, Gyldendal, 1957. 154 pp. 
With a preface by the translator. 

FINLAND 

As I Lay Dying 

Run tein kuolemaa, tr. by Alex. Matson. Helsinki, Kustannuso- 
sakeyhtio Tammi, 1952. 261 pp. With a preface by the translator. 

The Wild Palms 

Villipalmut, tr. by Alex. Matson. Helsinki, Kustannusosakeyhtio 
Tammi, 1947. 307 pp. With a preface by the translator. 

132 



FRANCE 

Absalom, Absalom! 
Absalon! Absalon!, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault and Ch.-P. Vorce. Paris, 
Gallimard, 1953. 331 pp. 

As I Lay Dying 
Tandis que j'agonise, tr. by Maurice E. Coindreau. Paris, Galli- 
mard, 1934. 270 pp. With a preface by Valery Larbaud. Also 
Paris, Editions Jean Boisseau, 1946. 225 pp., with engravings 
by Pierre Courtin, and without the preface. 

Doctor Marti no 
Le Docteur Martino et autres histoires, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault 
and Ch.-P. Vorce. Paris, Gallimard, 1948. 335 pp. 

A Fable 
Parabole, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault. Paris, Gallimard, 1958. 481 pp. 

Go Down, Moses 
Descends, Mo'ise, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault. Paris, Gallimard, 1955. 
318 pp. 

A Green Bough 
Le rameau vert, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault. Paris, Gallimard, 1955. 
220 pp. With parallel English and French texts. 

The Hamlet 
Le hameau, tr. by Rene Hilleret. Paris, Gallimard, 1959. 400 pp. 

Intruder in the Dust 
L'intrus, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault. Paris, Gallimard, 1952. 301 pp. 

Knight's Gambit 
Le gambit du cavalier, tr. by Andre du Bouchet. Paris, Gallimard, 
1951. 263 pp. Omits the story "Smoke." 

Light in August 
Lumiere d'aout, tr. by Maurice E. Coindreau. Paris, Gallimard, 
1935. 421 pp. Preface by the translator. 

Mosquitoes 

Moustiques, tr. by Pierre Desgroupes. Paris, Editions de Minuit, 

1948. 388 pp. With an introduction by Raymond Queneau. 

133 



Pylon 

Pylone, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault and Mme. Germaine Louis- 
Rousselet. Paris, Gallimard, 1946. 270 pp. Of three copies of 
the first impression I have examined, two have contained an 
unattached errata slip correcting an error on p. 244, line 27. 

Requiem for a Nun 
Requiem pour une nonne, tr. by Maurice E. Coindreau. Paris, 
Gallimard, 1957. 314 pp. With a preface by Albert Camus. 

(acting version) 

, tr. and adapted by Albert Camus. Paris, Gallimard, 1956. 

196 pp. 

Sanctuary 
Sanctuaire, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault and Henri Delgove. Paris, 
Gallimard, 1933. 308 pp. With a preface by Andre Malraux. 
Also Gallimard, 1958?, 436 pp., in their series Le Livre de Poche. 

Sartoris 
Sartoris, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault and Henri Delgove. Paris, Gal- 
limard, 1937. 335 pp. 

Soldiers' Pay 
Monnaie de singe, tr. by Maxime Gaucher. Grenoble and Paris, 
Arthaud, 1948. 363 pp. With a preface by the translator. 

The Sound and the Fury 
Le bruit et la fureur, tr. by Maurice E. Coindreau. Paris, Galli- 
mard, 1938. 309 pp. With a preface by the translator. Also 
Gallimard, 1959, in their series Le Livre de Poche. 

These 13 
Treize histoires, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault, Ch.-P. Vorce, and Mau- 
rice E. Coindreau. Paris, Gallimard, 1939. 280 pp. With a 
preface by R.-N. Raimbault. 

The Unvanquished 
L'invaincu, tr. by R.-N. Raimbault and Ch.-P. Vorce. Paris, Gal- 
limard, 1949. 280 pp. 

The Wild Palms 
Les palmiers sauvages, tr. by Maurice E. Coindreau. Paris, Gal- 
limard, 1952. 348 pp. With a preface by the translator. 

134 



anthology 
Jefferson, Mississippi, edited by Michel Mohrt. Paris, Le Club 
du meilleur livre (by arrangement with Gallimard), 1956. 458 
pp. With illustrations by Jacques Noel. Contains a map (based 
upon that in the American edition of Absalom, Absalom!) of 
Jefferson and Yoknapatawpha County, an introduction by the 
editor, and translations of seven short stories and excerpts from 
seven books. These selections, all but one of which had previ- 
ously appeared, are grouped in six sections, each with a brief 
introduction by the editor: "Le Tribunal," containing "A Name 
for the City" from Requiem for a Nun; "Sutpen," containing 
an excerpt from Absalom, Absalom!, and "Wash" from Doctor 
Martino; "Les Sartoris," containing excerpts from Sartoris and 
The Unvanquished, and "All the Dead Pilots" and "There Was 
a Queen"; "Les Compson," containing "A Justice," "That Eve- 
ning Sun," and excerpts from The Sound and the Fury (includ- 
ing the Appendix, tr. by Maurice E. Coindreau, published here 
for the first time); "Les McCaslin," containing "The Bear" from 
Go Down, Moses; and "Deux Portraits de Femmes," contain- 
ing "A Rose for Emily" and "Dry September." 

GERMANY 

Absalom, Absalom! 
Absalom, Absalom!, tr. by Hermann Stresau. Berlin, Rowohlt, 
1 93^- 373 PP- Also Stuttgart, Hamburg, and Baden-Baden, 
Rowohlt, 1948. 373 pp. Also Hamburg, Rowohlt, 1956, 373 pp. 

A Fable 
Eine Legende, tr. by Kurt Heinrich Hansen. Stuttgart, Scherz & 
Goverts, 1955. 509 pp. (Published simultaneously in Switzer- 
land.) 

Go Down, Moses (see also "The Bear") 
Das verworfene Erbe, tr. by Hermann Stresau. Stuttgart and Ham- 
burg, Scherz & Goverts, 1953. 358 pp. This translation omits 
"Pantaloon in Black," and includes a genealogy of the McCaslin 
family. (Published simultaneously in Switzerland.) 

A Green Bough 
Ein griiner Ziveig, tr. by Hans Hennecke. Stuttgart, Goverts, 1957. 
80 pp. Contains twenty-five of the forty-four poems of the 
original, with parallel English and German texts, and an after- 

135 



word by the translator. (Published earlier in the same year in 
Switzerland.) 

The Hamlet (see also "Spotted Horses") 
Das Dorf, tr. by Helmut M. Braem and Elisabeth Kaiser. Stuttgart, 
Goverts, 1957. 413 pp. (Published simultaneously in Switzer- 
land.) 

Intruder in the Dust 
Griff in den Staub, tr. by Harry Kahn. Stuttgart and Hamburg, 
Scherz & Goverts, 1951. 275 pp. (Published simultaneously in 
Switzerland.) Also Darmstadt, Das goldene Vlies, [no date; 
J 954 or 1955?,] 184 pp. 

Light in August 
Licht in August, tr. by Franz Fein. Berlin, Rowohlt, 1935. 455 pp. 
Other editions of this translation are: Hamburg and Stuttgart, 
Rowohlt, 1949, 95 pp. (a paperback without wrappers, the for- 
mat resembling a newspaper, 11 x 15 inches), illustrated by 
John A. Krause and Wilhelm M. Busch; Stuttgart, Hamburg, 
and Baden-Baden, Rowohlt, 1949, 455 pp.; Berlin and Darm- 
stadt, Deutsche Buch-Gemeinschaft, 1951, 406 pp.; Hamburg, 
Rowohlt, 1955, 365 pp.; Berlin, Volk k Welt, 1957, 508 pp. 

Pylon 

Wendemark, tr. by Georg Goyert. Berlin, Rowohlt, 1936. 295 pp. 
Also Hamburg, Rowohlt, 1951, 222 pp. 

Requiem for a Nun 
Requiem fur eine Nonne, tr. by Robert Schnorr. Stuttgart, Scherz 
& Goverts, 1956. 316 pp. (Published simultaneously in Switz- 
erland.) Also Darmstadt, Moderner Buch-Club, 1958, 271 pp. 

(acting version) 

, tr. and adapted by Robert Schnorr. Frankfurt, Fischer, 

1956. 171 pp. This translation, reproduced from typewritten 
copy, was available for acting purposes only and not for general 
sale. 

Sanctuary 

Die Freistatt, tr. by Herberth E. Herlitschka. Cologne and Berlin, 
Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 1953. 218 pp. (Published in Switzer- 
land in 1951.) Also Frankfurt, Das goldene Vlies, 1955, 218 pp. 
(includes the Modern Library introduction). 

136 



Soldiers' Pay 
Soldatenlohn, tr. by Susanna Rademacher. Hamburg, Rowohlt, 
1958. 242 pp. 

The Sound and the Fury 

Schall und Wahn, tr. by Helmut M. Braem and Elisabeth Kaiser. 
Stuttgart, Scherz fe Goverts, 1956. 336 pp. (Published simul- 
taneously in Switzerland.) 

The Town 
Die Stadt, tr. by Elisabeth Schnack. Stuttgart, Goverts, 1958. 387 
pp. (Published simultaneously in Switzerland.) 

The Unvanquished 
Die Unbesiegten, tr. by Erich Franzen. Stuttgart, Scherz & Goverts, 
1954. 274 pp. With a preface by the translator. (Published si- 
multaneously in Switzerland.) Also Frankfurt and Hamburg, 
Fischer, 1957, 210 pp. 

The Wild Palms 
Wilde Palmen und Der Strom, tr. by Helmut M. Braem and Elisa- 
beth Kaiser. Stuttgart, Scherz & Goverts, 1957. 321 pp. (Pub- 
lished simultaneously in Switzerland.) 

"The Bear" (from Go Down, Moses) 
Der Bar, tr. by Hermann Stresau. Frankfurt and Vienna, Forum, 
1955. 169 pp. (Published simultaneously in Switzerland.) Also 
Berlin and Frankfurt, Suhrkamp, i960, 180 pp. 

"Mountain Victory" 
Sieg in den Bergen, tr. by Hans Hennecke. Munich, Langen & 
Miiller, 1956. 67 pp. With an afterword by the translator. 

"Spotted Horses" (episode from The Hamlet) 
Scheckige Mustangs, tr. by Kurt Alboldt. Wiesbaden, Insel, 1956. 
76 pp. 

three stories 
Abendsonne: Drei Erzahlungen, tr. by Erich Franzen. Munich, 
Piper, 1956. 76 pp. Contains "That Evening Sun," "Red 
Leaves," and "Dry September." 

two stories 
Meine Grossmutter Millard und die Schlacht am Harry kin-Bach; 

137 



Schwarzer Harlekin, tr. by Elisabeth Schnack and Hermann 
Stresau. Stuttgart, Reclam, 1958. 91 pp. Contains "My Grand- 
mother Millard and General Bedford Forrest and the Battle of 
Harrykin Creek," and "Pantaloon in Black" (from Go Down, 
Moses), with an afterword by Helmut M. Braem. 

GREECE 

"Smoke" and Other Stories 
Kapnos kai alia diegemata, tr. by Bas. L. Kazantzes. Athens, Ek- 
lekta, [no date]. 128 pp. Contains an introduction by the trans- 
lator, and "Smoke," "Tomorrow," "Knight's Gambit," and 
"Hand upon the Waters" from Knight's Gambit. 

HOLLAND 

As I Lay Dying 

Uitvaart in Mississippi, tr. by Apie Prins and John Vandenbergh. 
Amsterdam, Bezige Bij, 1955. 197 pp. 

Intruder in the Dust 
Ongenode gast, tr. by Apie Prins. Amsterdam and Antwerp, 
Wereld-Bibliotheek, 1951. 237 pp. (Published simultaneously 
in Holland and Belgium.) 

Light in August 

Het licht in Augustus, tr. by I. E. Prins-Willekes Macdonald. 
Rotterdam, Van Staal & Co., 1938. 476 pp. With an introduc- 
tion by Theun de Vries. 

Geboorte in Augustus, tr. by I. E. Prins-Willekes Macdonald. Am- 
sterdam, Querido, 1951. 365 pp. (Translation originally pub- 
lished in 1938 as Het licht in Augustus.) 

Sanctuary 
Grijze zomer, tr. by Johan van Keulen. The Hague, Oisterwijk, 
1951. 201 pp. Later impressions, with 208 pp., contain an intro- 
duction by the translator. 

The Unvanquished 
De familie Sartoris, [name of translator not indicated]. Haarlem, 
Spaarnestad, 1938. 318 pp. With illustrations by Edward Shen- 
ton. 

138 



"Go Down, Moses" and "The Old People" 
(from Go Down, Moses) 
Het Oude Volk, tr. by Hans Edinga. Delft, W. Gaade, 1957. 76 
pp. With a preface by the translator. 

HUNGARY 

"The Bear" (from Go Down, Moses) 
A medve, tr. by Viktor Janos. Budapest, Europa Konyvkiado, 
1959. 201 pp. With a genealogy of the McCaslin family, p. [203]. 

ICELAND 

stories 
Smdsognr, tr. by Kristjan Karlsson, Reykjavik, Almenna Boka- 
felagid, 1956. 140 pp. Contains a foreword, and "Dry Septem- 
ber," "Elly," "That Evening Sun," "Wash," "A Rose for Emily," 
and "A Justice." 

IRAN 

The Unvanquished 
Taskhlr na pazir, tr. into Persian by Parviz Daryush. Teheran, 
Amir Kablr, 1956. 296 pp. 

ITALY 

Absalom, Absalom! 
Assalonne, Assalonne!, tr. by Glauco Cambon. Milan and Verona, 
Mondadori, 1954. 449 pp. With a preface by the translator, and 
illustrations by Bianca de Feo. 

As I Lay Dying 
Mentre Morivo, tr. by Giulio de Angelis. Milan and Verona, 
Mondadori, 1958. 242 pp. 

Go Down, Moses 
Scendi, Mose, tr. by Edoardo Bizzarri. Milan and Verona, Monda- 
dori, 1947. 386 pp. 

The Hamlet 
II Borgo, tr. by Cesare Pavese. Milan and Verona, Mondadori, 
1942. 420 pp. 

139 



Intruder in the Dust 
Non si Fruga nella Polvere, tr. by Fernanda Pivano. Milan and 
Verona, Mondadori, 1951. 309 pp. With an introduction by 
the translator. 

Light in August 
Luce d'Agosto, tr. by Elio Vittorini. Milan and Verona, Monda- 
dori, 1939. 484 pp. (Also Mondadori, 1954, 505 pp.) 

Miss Zilphia Gant 
La pallida Zilphia Gant, tr. by Fernanda Pivano. Milan, II Sag- 
giatore, 1959. 45 pp. With a preface by the translator. 

Mosquitoes 

Zanzare, tr. by Giulio de Angelis. Milan and Verona, Mondadori, 

!957- 374 PP- 

Pylon 

Oggi si Vola, tr. by Lorenzo Gigli. Milan and Verona, Mondadori, 
1937. 287 pp. (I have seen a 1947 copy of this translation with 
276 pp.) 

Requiem for a Nun 

Requiem per una Monaca, tr. by Fernanda Pivano. Milan and 
Verona, Mondadori, 1955. 228 pp. 

Sanctuary 
Santuario, tr. by Aldo Scagnetti. Milan and Rome, Jandi Sapi, 

1943- 327 PP- 
, tr. by Paola Ojetti Zamattio. Milan and Verona, Monda- 
dori, 1946. 368 pp. With an introduction by the translator, and 
illustrations by Renato Guttuso. (Also Mondadori, 1958, 327 
pp., without the illustrations.) 

Sartoris 
Sartoris, tr. by Filiberto Storoni. Milan and Rome, Jandi Sapi, 

1946. 350 pp. 
, tr. by Maria Stella Ferrari. Milan, Garzanti, 1955. 450 pp. 

Soldiers' Pay 

La Paga del Soldato, tr. by Massimo Alvaro. Milan, Garzanti, 1953. 

379 PP- 

The Sound and the Fury 

L'Urlo e il Furore, tr. by Augusto Dauphine. Milan and Verona, 
Mondadori, 1947. 261 pp. 

140 



These 13 
Questi Tredici, tr. by Francesco Lo Bue. Turin, Lattes, 1948. 323 
pp. With an introduction by the translator. 

The Unvanquished 
Gli Invitti, tr. by Alberto Marmont. Milan and Verona, Monda- 
dori, 1948. 226 pp. 

The Wild Palms 
Palme Selvagge, tr. by Bruno Fonzi. Milan and Verona, Monda- 
dori, 1956. 335 pp. 

anthology (The Portable Faulkner) 
664 Pagine di William Faulkner, tr. by Edoardo Bizzarri, Augusto 
Dauphine, Alberto Marmont, Cesare Pavese, Fernanda Pivano, 
and Elio Vittorini. Milan, II Saggiatore, 1959. 652 pp. With an 
introduction and notes by Malcolm Cowley. The contents are 
the same as in the Viking Portable Faulkner (New York, 1946), 
with the addition of two excerpts from Requiem for a Nun. 

New Orleans sketches 
New Orleans, tr. by Cesare Salmaggi. Milan, II Saggiatore, 1959. 
71 pp. Contains an abridged version of Carvel Collins' intro- 
duction to his edition of these sketches (Rutgers Univ. Press, 
1958), and six of the sixteen sketches: "Out of Nazareth," "The 
Kingdom of God," "The Kid Learns," "The Liar," "Country 
Mice," and "Yo Ho and Two Bottles of Rum." 

JAPAN 

Absalom, Absalom! 

(and other works) 
Gendai Amerika Bimgaku Zenshu . . . , tr. by Junzaburo Nishi- 
waki, et al. Tokyo, Arechi Shuppansha, 1958. 478 pp. (No. 8 in 
the series, Collection of Contemporary American Literature.) 
Contains Absalom, Absalom!, "The Bear," "A Rose for Emily," 
and "That Evening Sun." 

As I Lay Dying 
(and other works) 
[Works by Faulkner and Hemingway,] tr. by Kenzo Ohashi, et al. 
Tokyo, Chikuma, 1959. 473 pp. Contains As I Lay Dying, Pylon, 
and "Mississippi" by Faulkner, with Hemingway's A Fareiuell 
to Arms. 

141 



A Fable 
Guwa, tr. by Tomoji Abe. Tokyo, Iwanami, i960. 473 pp. 

Intruder in the Dust 
Bo jo eno chinnyusha, tr. by ShozS Kato. Tokyo, Hayakawa Shobo, 
1951. 273 pp. 

Knight's Gambit 

Kishi no kansei, tr. by Yasuo okubo. Tokyo, Yukeisha, 1951. 
360 pp. Also Tokyo, Shin'eisha, 1957, 255 pp. 

Pylon 

Sora no yuwaku, tr. by Kenzo Ohashi. Tokyo, Dabiddosha, 1954. 
263 pp. See also above, under As I Lay Dying. 

Sanctuary 
Tsumi no saidan, tr. by Masami Nishikawa and Naotaro Tatsuno- 
kuchi. Tokyo, Getsuyo Shobo, 1950. 330 pp. Also Tokyo, 
Shinchosha, 1955, 427 pp. 

Soldiers' Pay 
Heishi no kyiiyo, tr. by Saburo Yamaya. Tokyo, Hayakawa ShobS, 

1951. 410 pp. Also published in 1957 in two volumes, 250 and 

269 pp. 
Heishi no moratta hoshu, tr. by Ichiro Nishizaki. Tokyo, Jiji 

Tsushinsha, 1956. 319 pp. 

The Sound and the Fury; five stories 
Hibiki to Ikari, tr. by Masao Takahashi. Tokyo, Mikasa Shobo, 
1954. 461 pp. Contains, in addition to the novel, the stories "A 
Rose for Fmily," "Doctor Martino," "Red Leaves," "The Un- 
vanquished" [?], and "That Evening Sun." 

The Wild Palms 
Yasei no jonetsu, tr. by Yasuo Okubo. Tokyo, Hibiya Shuppansha, 
1950. 414 pp. Also Tokyo, Mikasa ShobS, 1951, 312 pp. 

five stories 
Emily no bara; Ryoken, tr. by Masao Takahashi and Kichinosuke 
Ohashi. Tokyo, Eihosha, 1956. 190 pp. Contains "A Rose for 
Emily," "Cievasse," "The Hound," "Pantaloon in Black," and 
"Eula." 

six stories 

Tampenshu, tr. by Naotaro Tatsunokuchi. Tokyo, Shinchosha, 

142 



ig55- 168 pp. Contains "Jealousy," "A Rose for Emily," "Dry 
September," "That Evening Sun," "Barn Burning," and 
"Wash." 

eight stories 
Emily no bara, tr. by Naotaro Tatsunokuchi. Tokyo, Cosmopoli- 
tansha, 1952. 344 pp. Contains "A Rose for Emily," "That Eve- 
ning Sun," "Dry September," "An Odor of Verbena," "Delta 
Autumn." "Barn Burning," "Turnabout," and "The Hound." 

KOREA 

The Wild Palms 

Yasaeng eui zongyeol. Beommungak. Seoul, Bak Seung Hun, 1958. 

323 PP- 

LEBANON 

five stories 
Dukhan wa qisas ukhra, tr. into Arabic by Adil Hamid. Beirut, 
Dar al-Kitab, 1957. 168 pp. Contains "Smoke," "Monk," "Hand 
upon the Waters," "Tomorrow," and "An Error in Chemistry" 
(all but the title story from Knight's Gambit), with a preface 
by the translator. 

MEXICO 

A Fable 
Una Fdbula, tr. by Antonio Ribera. Mexico City, Editorial 
Cumbre, 1955. 365 pp. With an introduction by Agusti [sic] 
Bartra. 

NORWAY 

Light in August 
M0rk August, tr. by Sigurd Hoel. Oslo, Gyldendal, 1934. 442 pp. 
(Also 1951, 426 pp.) 

Sanctuary 
Det aller helligste, tr. by Leo Str0m. Oslo, Gyldendal, 1951. 289 
pp. With a foreword by Sigurd Hoel, and the Modern Library 
introduction. 

Soldiers' Pay 
Soldatens sold, tr. by Hans Heiberg. Oslo, Gyldendal, 1932. 

The Unvanquished 
De ubeseirede, tr. by Leo Str0m. Oslo, Gyldendal, 1957. 206 pp. 

143 



fourteen stories 
Noveller, tr. by Leo Str0m. Oslo, Gyldendal, 1951. 261 pp. Con- 
tains a preface by the translator, "Was," "Barn Burning," "Two 
Soldiers," "Dry September," "All the Dead Pilots," "That Eve- 
ning Sun," "Red Leaves," "A Justice," "A Courtship," "Ad 
Astra," "Wash," "Honor," "Doctor Martino," and "Carcas- 
sonne." 

POLAND 

Absalom, Absalom! 
Absalomie, Absalomie, tr. by Zofia Kierszys. Warsaw, Pahstwowy 
Instytut Wydawniczy, 1959. 528 pp. With an afterword by the 
translator. 

Collected Stories 
Opowiadania, tr. by Zofia Kierszys, Ewa Zyciehska, and Jan 
Zakrzewski. Warsaw, Pahstwowy Instytut Wydawniczy, 1958. 2 
vols. 470, 605 pp. Vol. I contains the first twenty stories of the 
original edition, Vol. II contains the remaining twenty-two. 

Light in August 

Siviatlosc w Sierpniu, tr. by Maciej Slomczyhski. Warsaw, Czytel- 

nik > 1959- 5°9 PP- 

Sanctuary 

Azyl, tr. by Zofia Kierszys. Warsaw, Pahstwowy Instytut Wy- 
dawniczy, 1957. 317 pp. 

The Wild Palms 
Dzikie Palmy; Stary, tr. by Kalina Wojciechowska. Warsaw, Czytel- 
nik, 1958. 410 pp. With an afterword by the translator. The 
two parts of the novel are printed separately, instead of alter- 
nately, chapter by chapter, as in the original. 

PORTUGAL 

Intruder in the Dust 
O Mundo nao Perdoa, tr. by Antonio de Sousa. Lisbon, Publicacoes 
Europa- America, 1952. 356 pp. With a prefatory note by the 
publisher. 

Requiem for a Nun 
Requiem por uma Freira, tr. by Luis de Sousa Rebelo. Lisbon, 
Minerva (Coleccao Folio), 1958. 297 pp. With an introduction 
by the translator. 

144 



Sanctuary 
Santudrio, tr. by Marilia de Vasconcelos. Lisbon, Minerva, 1958. 
277 pp. 

Sartoris 

Sartoris, tr. by Carlos Vieira. Lisbon, Ulisseia, 1958. 422 pp. With 
a translation of the introduction by Robert Cantwell from the 
Signet edition (New York, 1953). 

The Unvanquished 
Os Invencidos, tr. by Abel Marques Ribeiro. Lisbon, Minerva, 
i960. 285 pp. 

"Old Man" (from The Wild Palms) 
O Homem e O Rio, tr. by Luis de Sousa Rebelo. Lisbon, Portu- 
galia, n.d. [1959 or i960?]. 200 pp. With a preface by the trans- 
lator. (No. 1 in the series, O Livro de Bolso.) 

six stories 

Antologia do Conto Moderno: William Faulkner, tr. by Victor 

Palla. Coimbra, Atlantida-Livraria, 1948. 201 pp. Contains a 

preface by the translator, "That Evening Sun," "Elly," "Two 

Soldiers," "The Old People," "The Bear," and "Delta Au- 



tumn. 



RUMANIA 



five stories 
Victorie, tr. by Margareta Sterian. Bucharest, Editura de stat 
pentru literatura si arta, 1957. 169 pp. Contains "Victory," "Dry 
September," "A Rose for Emily," "Red Leaves," and "A 
Justice." A 4 pp. publisher's note precedes the text. 

RUSSIA 

seven stories 
Sem' rasskazov, tr. by I. Kashkin, O. Kholmskaya, R. Raim-Kova- 
leva, M. Bekker, and M. Bogoslovskaya. Moscow, Izdatel'stvo 
inostrannoi literatury, 1958. 177 pp. Contains an afterword by 
I. Kashkin, and "Barn Burning," "A Justice," "Red Leaves," 
"That Evening Sun," "Smoke," "Percy Grimm" [episode from 
Light in August], and "Victory." 

145 



SPAIN 

As I Lay Dying 

Mientras agonizo, tr. by Agusti'n Caballero Robredo and Arturo 
del Hoyo. Madrid, Aguilar, 1954. 243 pp. With an introduction 
by the translators. 

A Fable 

Una Fdbula, tr. by Antonio Ribera. Barcelona, Exito, 1955. 373 pp. 

Go Down, Moses 

jDesciende, Aloises!, tr. by Ana-Maria de Foronda. Barcelona, 

Caralt, 1955. 296 pp. With a prefatory note by the translator. 

The Hamlet 
El Villorrio, tr. by J. Napoletano Torre and P. Carbo Amiguet. 
Barcelona, Caralt, 1953. 328 pp. (In three copies examined of 
what appears to be the first impression, the last page number 
is 283, but this is in error for 328.) 

Mosquitoes 
Mosquitos, tr. by Domingo Manfredi. Barcelona, Caralt, 1959. 
256 pp. 

Pylon 
Pylon, tr. by Julio Fernandez-Yanez. Barcelona, Caralt, 1947. 

221 pp. 

Sanctuary 
Santuario, tr. by Lino Novas Calvo. Madrid, Espasa-Calpe, 1934. 
269 pp. With a preface by Antonio Marichalar. 

Soldiers' Pay 
La Paga de los Soldados [name of translator not indicated]. Barce- 
lona, Caralt, 1954. 303 pp. 

The Town 
En la Ciudad, tr. by Ramon Hernandez. Barcelona and Buenos 
Aires, Plaza & Janes, 1960. 351 pp. (Though the imprint lists 
both the Spanish and the Argentine branches of the publisher, 
the only two copies I have examined were issued by the Spanish 
branch.) 

The Unvanquished 
Los invictos, tr. by Alberto Vila de Aviles. Barcelona, Caralt, 1951. 

222 pp. 

146 



COLLECTED WORKS 

Obras escogidas, Vol. I, tr. by Agustin Caballero Robredo, Arturo 
del Hoyo, Julio Fernandez-Yanez, Alberto Vila de Avil£s, J. 
Napoletano Torre, P. Carbo Amiguet, and Ana-Maria de 
Foronda. Madrid, Aguilar, 1956. 1266 pp. Contains a preface 
by Agustin Caballero Robredo; the Nobel Prize address; 
Mientras agonizo; Pylon; Los invictos; El Villorrio; and 
jDesciende, Aloises! 

note: The firm of Caralt have announced their intention of bringing out 
an Obras completas of Faulkner, of which the first volume, bound in leather, 
will contain La Paga de los Soldados; Mosquitos; El Villorrio; and iDesciende, 
Aloises! Each work will be illustrated by a different artist. 

SWEDEN 

As I Lay Dying 
Medan jag lag och dog, tr. by Marten Edlund. Stockholm, Bon- 
nier, 1948. 205 pp. 

Intruder in the Dust 
Inkraktare i stojtet, tr. by Th. Warburton. Stockholm, Bonnier, 
1950. 202 pp. 

Light in August 
Ljus i augusti, tr. by Erik Lindegren. Stockholm, Bonnier, 1944. 
387 pp. 

Requiem for a Nun 
Sjalamassa for en nunna, tr. by Marten Edlund. Stockholm, Bon- 
nier, 1952. 272 pp. 

Sanctuary 
Det allra heligaste, tr. by Marten Edlund. Stockholm, Bonnier, 

195 1 - 2 3 6 PP- 

Sartoris 
Sartoris, tr. by Th. Warburton. Stockholm, Bonnier, 1955. 285 
pp. 

The Town 
Staden, tr. by Pelle Fritz-Crone. Stockholm, Bonnier, 1958. 345 pp. 

The Unvanquished 
De obesegrade, tr. by Hakan Norlen. Stockholm, Folket i Bild, 
1948. 267 pp. With an introduction by Thorsten Jonsson. 

147 



The Wild Palms 
De vilda palmerna, tr. by Marten Edlund. Stockholm, Bonnier, 
1949. 260 pp. 

"The Bear" (from Go Down, Moses) 

Bjdrnen, tr. by Olov Jonason. Stockholm, Raben & Sjogren, 1959. 

186 pp. With a foreword by the translator, and a genealogy. 

SWITZERLAND 

A Fable 

Eine Legende, tr. by Kurt Heinrich Hansen. Zurich, Fretz & 
Wasmuth, 1955. 509 pp. (Published simultaneously in Ger- 
many.) 

Go Down, Moses 
(see also "Was") 
Das verworfene Erbe, tr. by Hermann Stresau. Zurich, Fretz & 
Wasmuth, 1953. 358 pp. This translation omits "Pantaloon in 
Black," and includes a genealogy of the McCaslin family. (Pub- 
lished simultaneously in Germany.) 

A Green Bough 
Ein griiner Zweig, tr. by Hans Hennecke. Zurich, Fretz & Was- 
muth, 1957. 80 pp. Contains twenty-five of the forty-four poems 
of the original, with parallel English and German texts, and 
an afterword by the translator. (Published later in the same 
year in Germany.) 

The Hamlet 
Das Dorf, tr. by Helmut M. Braem and Elisabeth Kaiser. Zurich, 
Fretz & Wasmuth, 1957. 413 pp. (Published simultaneously in 
Germany.) 

Intruder in the Dust 
Griff in den Staub, tr. by Harry Kahn. Zurich, Fretz & "Wasmuth, 
1951. 275 pp. (Published simultaneously in Germany.) 

Requiem for a Nun 
Requiem fur eine Nonne, tr. by Robert Schnorr. Zurich, Fretz & 
Wasmuth, 1956. 316 pp. (Published simultaneously in Ger- 
many.) 

Sanctuary 
Die Freistatt, tr. by Herberth E. Herlitschka. Zurich, Artemis, 
1951. 279 pp. Includes the Modern Library introduction. Also 

148 



ig53> 218 pp. (1953 edition also published in Germany in that 
year.) 

The Sound and the Fury 
Schall und Wahn, tr. by Helmut M. Braem and Elisabeth Kaiser. 
Zurich, Fretz & Wasmuth, 1956. 336 pp. (Published simul- 
taneously in Germany.) 

The Town 
Die Stadt, tr. by Elisabeth Schnack. Zurich, Fretz & Wasmuth, 

1958. 387 pp. (Published simultaneously in Germany.) 

The Unvanquished 
Die Unbesiegten, tr. by Erich Franzen. Zurich, Fretz & Wasmuth, 
1954. 274 pp. With a preface by the translator. (Published 
simultaneously in Germany.) 

The Wild Palms 
Wilde Palmen und Der Strom, tr. by Helmut M. Braem and 
Elisabeth Kaiser. Zurich, Fretz & Wasmuth, 1957. 321 pp. (Pub- 
lished simultaneously in Germany.) 

"Was" (from Go Down, Moses) 
Jagdgliick, tr. by Elisabeth Schnack. Zurich, Arche, 1956. 46 pp. 
With an afterword by the translator. 

TURKEY 

four stories 
Doktor Mar lino, tr. by Bilge Karasu. Istanbul, Yenilik Yayinevi, 
! 956- 79 PP- Contains "Go Down, Moses," "Elly," "Carcas- 
sonne," and "Doctor Martino." 

five stories 
Duman, tr. by Talat Halman. Istanbul, Varlik Yayinevi, 1952. 
124 pp. Contains "Smoke," "Hand upon the Waters," "To- 
morrow," "An Error in Chemistry," and "Monk" (all save the 
title story from Knight's Gambit). 

anthology 
Kirmizi Yapraklar, tr. by Ulkii Tamer. Istanbul, Atac Kitapevi, 

1959. Contains the Nobel Prize address and four stories: "That 
Evening Sun," "Dry September," "Red Leaves," and "A 
Justice." 

149 



YUGOSLAVIA 

Intruder in the Dust 
Uljez u prasinu, tr. into Serbo-Croatian by Svetozar Brkic. Bel- 
grade, Novo pokoljenje, 1953. 234 pp. 

Light in August 
Svetloba v Avgustu, tr. into Slovenian by Mira Mihelic. Ljubljana, 

Cankarjeva zalozba, 1952. 457 pp. 
Svjetlo u Augustu, tr. into Serbo-Croatian by Sime Balen. Zagreb, 
Zora, 1953. 370 pp. 

Sanctuary 
Svetiliste, tr. into Serbo-Croatian (Cyrillic alphabet) by Milica 
Mihajlovic. Novi Sad, Bratstvo jedinstvo, 1953. 325 pp. 

The Sound and the Fury 
Krik i bijes, tr. into Serbo-Croatian by Stjepan Kresic. Zagreb, 
Naprijed, 1958. 352 pp. Includes the Modern Library Appendix, 
and an introduction by the translator. 

The Town 
Grad, tr. into Serbo-Croatian by Branko Brusar. Zagreb, Mladost, 
1959. 403 pp. With an afterword by the translator. 

The Wild Palms 
Divlje palme, tr. into Serbo-Croatian by Herbert Griin. Ljubljana, 
Drzavna zalozba Slovenije, 1959. 278 pp. 

"The Bear" (from Go Down, Moses) 
Medved, tr. into Serbo-Croatian (Cyrillic alphabet) by Aleksandar 
Nejgebauer. Novi Sad, Matica srpska, 1954. 125 pp. 

"Knight's Gambit" (from Knight's Gambit) 
Konjicki gambit, tr. into Serbo-Croatian (Cyrillic alphabet) by 
Bozidar Markovic. Belgrade, Prosveta, 1954. 149 pp. Contains 
the title story only from Knight's Gambit, and an afterword, 
presumably by the translator. 

two stories 
Rida za Emily; Sumi Septembar, tr. into Serbo-Croatian by Ivan 
Slamnig and Antun Soljan. Zagreb, Sloga, 1957. 42 pp. Con- 
tains "A Rose for Emily" and "Dry September." 

150 



PART FIVE 

MOTION PICTURES AND 
TELEVISION 



Introduction 155 

I. Faulkner's Writing for Motion Pictures 

a. Pictures for which Faulkner received screen credit 156 

b. Pictures on which Faulkner worked for which he 

did not receive screen credit 158 

c. Unproduced properties upon which Faulkner worked 160 

II. Motion Pictures Adapted from Faulkner's Writings 161 

III. Faulkner's Writing for Television 162 

IV. Television Plays Adapted from Faulkner's Writings 162 



INTRODUCTION 

Faulkner's career as a writer for the screen has been a long one. 
His professional connection with Hollywood began in 1933 with 
the MGM Today We Live, based on his short story "Turn About," 
and adapted for the screen by Faulkner himself, among others. 
Though this is the only movie based on his own writings which 
Faulkner has had a hand in adapting, five of his novels have been 
produced as motion pictures, and for a span of twenty years, off and 
on, he worked as a writer in Hollywood. In 1953 he similarly made 
his debut as a television writer by helping adapt one of his own 
stories, "The Brooch," and since that date there have been per- 
formances of an original Faulkner television play, and of eleven 
more adaptations from his stories or novels, one made by Faulk- 
ner himself. 

To compile a list of Faulkner's works that have been adapted 
for movies or TV presents few problems, and the only scripts 
which he did for TV received wide publicity. But his own work 
for Hollywood is another matter. He has said that he has received 
film credit for work he did not do, and has not received credit 
for work which he did. The whole question of credits and attri- 
butions in film writing is a complex and, to the outsider, often 
insoluble one. A writer's part in a film may be anything from a 
small collaborative part in a screenplay to the writing of the 
entire script. He may do a treatment (that is, a preliminary out- 
line of a script, perhaps with some dialogue) of a property (that 
is, a novel or play or other source for the script), or he may be 
assigned to the revision of someone else's treatment or screenplay. 
Whatever part he plays, even in the writing of the final screen- 
play used in the actual production of the movie, is unlikely to 
be reliably recorded in any detail anywhere that it is available for 
such a purpose as this check list. In short, there is likely to be 
very little point in attempting to determine anything about a 
film writer from the spoken dialogue of a movie or even from 
the script itself, save for the remote possibility of certain knowl- 
edge that the writer is the sole author of the final script. 

Because of these factors, much of the information presented 
here about Faulkner's writing for Hollywood is speculative, with 
a high possibility of inaccuracy. But it still seems proper to me 
to attempt to assemble what is known about the subject, though 

155 



the reliability of the data may be open to question. No trace 
of Faulkner's hand may remain in a film, yet to record the fact 
or even the possibility that he worked on it may not only point 
the way toward eventual proof but also can help round out our 
picture of Faulkner — not Faulkner the artist and pioneer in 
fiction, but Faulkner the hardworking twentieth-century literary 
craftsman engaged in the business of making a living by his 
writing. 

Most of the basic facts about the films provided in sections 
I and II of this listing were taken from three sources: the Library 
of Congress Copyright Office Catalogue of Copyright Entries . . . : 
Motion Pictures, igi 2-1 939 (Washington, 1951), and its supple- 
ment for 1940-1949 (Washington, 1953); the biennial, later annual, 
volumes of the Motion Picture Almanac (published in New York 
by Quigley); and the annual volumes of the Film Daily Year 
Book of Motion Pictures (published in New York by the Film 
Daily). But for the attribution to Faulkner of most of the items 
listed in lb. and Ic. I am indebted to George Sidney, who has 
kindly permitted me to make use here of his unpublished doctoral 
dissertation, "Faulkner in Hollywood: A Study of His Career as 
a Scenarist" (University of New Mexico, 1959). With few ex- 
ceptions, all of them noted, the list of Faulkner's writing for the 
movies for which he did not receive screen credit is based on Dr. 
Sidney's valuable study. 

Undocumented information concerning television adaptations 
is taken from the daily or weekly schedules, announcements, and 
advertisements of the Radio and Television programs in the New 
York Times, or the weekly listings of the TV Guide published 
by Triangle Publications, Inc., where they can be referred to by 
the date of the broadcast. Miss Anne Louise Davis of Harold 
Ober Associates was kind enough to supply me with a list of many 
of the titles and dates of performances. 

I. FAULKNER'S WRITING FOR 
MOTION PICTURES 

a. Pictures for which Faulkner received screen credit: 

1. Today We Live, released 28 April, 1933. Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer Corp. Producer and director, Howard Hawks. Story 
and dialogue, William Faulkner. Screenplay, Edith Fitzgerald 

156 



and Dwight Taylor. Cast includes Joan Crawford, Gary 
Cooper, and Robert Young. [Based on the Faulkner short 
story "Turn About." Faulkner did original treatment of 
the story.] 

2. Road to Glory, released 4 September, 1936. Twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox Film Corp. Director, Howard Hawks. Screenplay, 
Joel Sayre and William Faulkner. 1 Cast includes Fredric 
March, Warner Baxter, and Lionel Barrymore. [Based on 
the novel Wooden Crosses by Roland Dorgeles, New York, 
1921.] 

3. Slave Ship, released 2 July, 1937. Twentieth Century-Fox 
Film Corp. Director, Tay Garnett. Story, William Faulkner. 2 
Screenplay, Sam Hellman, Lamar Trotti, and Gladys Leh- 
man. Cast includes Wallace Beery and Warner Baxter. 
[Based on the novel The Last Slaver, by George S. King, 
New York, 1933-] 

4. To Have and Have Not, released 20 January, 1945. Warner 
Brothers Pictures, Inc. Director, Howard Hawks. Screen- 
play, Jules Furthman and William Faulkner. Cast includes 
Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. [Based on the novel 
by Ernest Hemingway, New York, 1937.] 

5. The Big Sleep, released 31 August, 1946. Warner Brothers 
Pictures, Inc. Director, Howard Hawks. Screenplay, Wil- 
liam Faulkner, Leigh Brackett, and Jules Furthman. Cast 
includes Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. [Based on 
the novel by Raymond Chandler, New York, 1939.] 

6. Land of the Pharaohs, released July 2, 1955. Continental 
Co., released by Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc. Producer 
and director, Howard Hawks. Screenplay, William Faulk- 
ner, Harry Kurnitz, and Harold Jack Bloom. Cast includes 
Jack Hawkins and Joan Collins. 

1 According to Sidney, p. 44, the final version of the screenplay was done by 
Nunnally Johnson, who "threw out much of what they had written, ... at the 
same time insisting that Faulkner and Sayre receive screen credit." Sidney thinks 

(p. 42n.) that Faulkner may have written a treatment of it. 

2 Sidney concludes, p. 85 in the dissertation cited above, that "the attribution . . . 
to Faulkner is inexplicable and probably incorrect," basing his decision on records 
at the Twentieth Century-Fox offices which show no evidence that Faulkner worked 
on this property until the final credits were released. However, Sidney thinks 
that Faulkner may possibly have written a treatment of The Last Slaver (see pp. 
42n. and 84). 

157 



b. Pictures on which Faulkner worked for xvhich he did not receive 

screen credit: 

note: Included in this highly speculative listing are pictures in which 
Faulkner is supposed to have had a share in the finished production, and 
those for which he is supposed to have done work which was discarded before 
production. 

1. Lazy River, released 7 March, 1934. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
Corp. Producer, Lucien Hubbard. Director, George B. Seitz. 
Screenplay, Lucien Hubbard. Cast includes Jean Parker and 
Robert Young. [Faulkner did some work on the screenplay.] 

2. Banjo on My Knee, released 4 Dec, 1936. Twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox Film Corp. Director, John Cromwell. Screenplay, 
Nunnally Johnson. Cast includes Barbara Stanwyck and Joel 
McCrea. [Faulkner wrote a part of a discarded screenplay. 3 ] 

3. Four Men and a Prayer, released 29 April, 1938. Twentieth 
Century-Fox Film Corp. Director, John Ford. Screenplay, 
Richard Sherman, Sonya Levien, and Walter Ferris. Cast 
includes Loretta Young and Richard Greene. [Faulkner was 
assigned to this screenplay, but apparently did not complete 
the assignment. 4 ] 

4. Submarine Patrol, released 25 Nov., 1938. Twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox Film Corp. Associate producer, Gene Markey. 
Director, John Ford. Screenplay, Rian James, Darrell Ware, 
and Jack Yellen. Cast includes Richard Greene and Nancy 
Kelly. [Based on the book The Splinter Fleet of the Otranto 
Barrage, by Ray Millholland, Indianapolis and New York, 
1936. Faulkner's screenplay, done in collaboration with 
Katherine Scola, was never used.] 

5. Gunga Din, released 17 Feb., 1939. RKO Radio Pictures, 
Inc. Producer, George Stevens. Author, Rudyard Kipling. 
Screenplay, Ben Hecht, Charles MacArthur, Joel Sayre, 
Fred Guiol. Cast includes Cary Grant, Victor McLagen, and 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. 5 

6. Drums along the Mohawk, released 10 Nov., 1939. Twen- 
tieth Century-Fox Film Corp. Director, John Ford. Screen- 

3 Sidney, pp. 161-165, quotes part of Faulkner's unused sequence. 

* Sidney, pp. 41-42. 

s A friend of Faulkner who had at one time been his literary agent is responsible 
for the statement, made in August 1937, that Faulkner had done work on this film, 
before going on to Drums along the Mohawk. (Information provided by Mr. H. 
Richard Archer, January 30, i960.) 

158 



play, Lamar Trotti and Sonya Levien. Cast includes Henry 
Fonda and Claudette Colbert. [Based on the novel by 
Walter Edmonds, Boston, 1936. Faulkner's original treat- 
ment was never used. 6 ] 

7. The Southerner, released 10 Aug., 1945. United Artists. 
Producers, David Loew and Robert Hakim. Director, Jean 
Renoir. Author, George Sessions Perry. Screenplay, Jean 
Renoir. Adaptation, Hugo Butler. Cast includes Zachary 
Scott and Betty Field. [Based on the novel, Hold Autumn 
in Your Hand, by George Sessions Perry, New York, 1941. 7 ] 

8. Stallion Road, released 12 April, 1947. Warner Brothers 
Pictures, Inc. Producer, Alex Gottlieb. Director, James V. 
Kern. Screenplay, Stephen Longstreet. Cast includes Ronald 
Reagan, Alexis Smith, and Zachary Scott. [Based on the 
novel of the same name by Stephen Longstreet, New York, 
1945. Faulkner is supposed to have done some work on this 
property between June and September, 1945.] 

g. The Left Hand of God, released September, 1955. Twen- 
tieth Century-Fox Film Corp. Producer, Buddy Adler. Di- 
rector, Edward Dmytryk. Screenplay, Alfred Hayes. Cast in- 
cludes Humphrey Bogart and Gene Tierney. [Based on the 
novel by William E. Barrett, New York, 1951. 8 ] 
note: Sidney, p. 48, states that according to the Twentieth Century-Fox 
files, Faulkner did some work for Universal, where he did a treatment of 
Sutter's Gold (released 9 April, 1936). But Universal, according to Sidney, 
denies the affiliation. While at Warner, between July 1942 and September 
1945, Faulkner may well have had a hand in the following films, Sidney 
feels (p. 47), though proof is lacking: Background to Danger (released 
25 June, 1943); God Is My Copilot (7 April, 1945); Mildred Pierce (20 Dec, 
1945); Deep Valley (29 Aug., 1947); and The Adventures of Don Juan 
(29 Jan., 1949). 

6 Sidney, pp. 113-151, quotes this treatment in full. 

7 According to Zachary Scott, Faulkner wrote the screenplay for this film, but 
could not receive credit because of contractual obligations. (Information provided in 
interview with Mr. Scott, January 23, 1958. See also p. 47.) 

s Apparently Faulkner did a screenplay based on this novel for Howard Hawks 
in 1951, which was not used. Hedda Hopper, in her column of March 24, 1951 
(Chicago Daily Tribune, Part 2, p. 2), quotes Hawks as saying that Faulkner's script 
is "terrific." A collector has shown me a copy of Faulkner's script reproduced from 
typewritten copy, 170 pp., with the cover-title the left hand of god / Screen Play / 
by / William Faulkner / first draft continuity / January 24, 1952. 



159 



c. Unproduced properties upon which Faulkner worked: 

For Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, between May 1932 and May 1933: 

1. "Man Servant" Faulkner wrote original screenplay. 

2. "Faulkner Story #2" Faulkner wrote original screenplay. 

3. "Honor" Faulkner wrote original screenplay, based on 
his short story. 

4. "Latin American Kingdom" Faulkner wrote original 
screenplay. 

5. "War Birds" Faulkner wrote original screenplay, based on 
his novel Sartoris (New York, 1929) and stories "Ad Astra" 
and "All the Dead Pilots" (both 1931). 

6. "Flying the Mail" Faulkner wrote original treatment. 

7. "Turn to the Right" Faulkner wrote original treatment. 

For Twentieth Century-Fox, between November 1935 and 
August 1937: 

8. "The Giant Swing" Faulkner was assigned to this screen- 
play but apparently turned in nothing on it. 

For Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., between July, 1942 and Sep- 
tember, 1945: 

9. "The DeGaulle Story" Faulkner wrote original screen- 
play. 

10. "The Life and Death of a Bomber" Faulkner wrote orig- 
inal treatment. 

11. "Country Lawyer" Faulkner wrote original treatment of 
the novel by Bellamy Partridge (New York, 1939). 

12. "Battle Cry" Faulkner did some work on this collaborative 
screenplay. 9 

13. "The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse" Faulkner rewrote the 
screenplay for a remake of the 1938 film adapted from the 
Barre Lyndon play of the same name. Faulkner's revision 
was tentatively entitled "Fog over London." 

14. "Revolt in the Earth" Faulkner and Dudley Murphy col- 
laborated upon this treatment of Absalom, Absalom!, which 
exists in Faulkner's collection of his manuscripts. (See p. 
92-) 

s This completed but unproduced screenplay has no connection with the 1955 
Warner Brothers film based on the novel by Leon Uris (New York, 1953). 

160 



Note: Sidney, p. 4811., states that according to the Twentieth 
Century-Fox files, Faulkner in the 1930's did some work for 
Paramount, where he collaborated on a screenplay entitled 
"Bride of the Bayou." But Paramount, according to Sidney, 
denies the affiliation. Sidney also feels (p. 47) that Faulkner 
may well have had a hand in an unproduced rewriting, for 
Warner in the ig4o's, of the 1936 Petrified Forest. For Faulkner 
manuscripts relating to his Hollywood career which cannot be 
dated or more precisely identified, see pp. 92/93. 



II. MOTION PICTURES ADAPTED FROM 
FAULKNER'S WRITINGS 

1. Today We Live. (See under la.) 

2. The Story of Temple Drake, released 12 May, 1933. Para- 
mount Productions, Inc. Director, Stephen Roberts. Screen- 
play, Oliver H. P. Garrett. 10 Cast includes Miriam Hopkins 
and Jack LaRue. [Based on the novel Sanctuary, New York, 
193 1 -] 

3. Intruder in the Dust, released 3 Feb., 1950. Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer Corp. Producer and director, Clarence Brown. Screen- 
play, Ben Maddow. Cast includes David Brian, Claude Jar- 
man, Jr., and Juano Hernandez. [Based on the novel of the 
same name, New York, 1948.] 

4. The Tarnished Angels, released January, 1958. Universal. 
Producer, Albert Zugsmith. Director, Douglas Sirk. Screen- 
play, George Zuckerman. Cast includes Rock Hudson and 
Robert Stack. [Based on the novel Pylon, New York, 1935.] 

5. The Long Hot Summer, released March, 1958. Twentieth 
Century-Fox. Producer, Jerry Wald. Director, Martin Ritt. 
Screenplay, Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank, Jr. Cast in- 
cludes Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, and Orson Welles. 
[Based on the novel The Hamlet, New York, 1940.] 

6. The Sound and the Fury, released March 1959. Twentieth 
Century-Fox. Producer, Jerry Wald. Director, Martin Ritt. 

10 A shooting script in the Paramount files, however, bears the name of Maurice 
Watkins as co-author. See p. 48. 

161 



Screenplay by Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank, Jr. Cast 
includes Yul Brynner and Joanne Woodward. [Based on 
the novel of the same name, New York, 1929.] 

note: Several other Faulkner novels have been bought by Hollywood, 
including The Unvanquished, Light in August, and Requiem for a Nun. 



III. FAULKNER'S WRITING FOR 
TELEVISION 

1. The Brooch, telecast 2 April, 1953. Lux Video Theatre. 
Adapted by William Faulkner, Ed Rice, and Richard Mc- 
Donogh from Faulkner's short story of the same name. Cast 
includes Dan Duryea, Sally Forrest, and Mildred Natwick. 

note: Although the advertising for "The Brooch" credited only Faulkner 
with the adaptation (see ad in the New York Times, 2 April, 1953, p. 38), 
both Rice, who was an editor for the Lux Video Theatre, and McDonogh, 
who was a producer-editor on the show, collaborated with him on the final 
script. (Information in a letter from Edward B. Roberts, 17 May, i960.) 

2. "Shall Not Perish," telecast 1 1 Feb., 1954. CBS, Video Thea- 
tre. Adapted by Faulkner from his short story of the same 
name. Cast includes Fay Bainter and Raymond Burr. 

3. The Graduation Dress, telecast 30 Oct., 1960. CBS, General 
Electric Theatre. Original television play by Faulkner. Cast 
includes Hu°h O'Brian and Stella Stevens. 

IV. TELEVISION PLAYS ADAPTED FROM 
FAULKNER'S WRITINGS 

1. The Brooch. (See under III.) 

2. Shall Not Perish. (See under III.) 

3. Smoke, telecast 4 May, 1954. CBS, Suspense. Adapted by 
Gore Vidal from Faulkner's story of the same name. Pro- 
ducer, Martin Manulis. Director, Robert Mulligan. Cast 
includes E. G. Marshall, George Mitchell, Pat Hingle, and 
Bart Burns. Winner of the 1954 Mystery Writers of Amer- 
ica Award for the year's best television play. 11 

4. Barn Burning, telecast 17 Aug., 1954. CBS, Suspense. 
Adapted by Gore Vidal from Faulkner's story of the same 

162 



name. Producer, David Heilweil. Director, Robert Mulli- 
gan. Cast includes E. G. Marshall, Charles Taylor, Peter 
Cookson, and Beatrice Straight. 11 

5. An Error in Chemistry, telecast 2 Dec, 1954. CBS, Climax. 
Adapted from Faulkner's story of the same name. Cast in- 
cludes Edmund O'Brien. 

6. Wild Stallion, telecast 7 July, 1955. CBS, Climax. Adapted 
from Faulkner's long story, "Knight's Gambit." Cast in- 
cludes Paul Henreid, Evelyn Keyes, and Mary Astor. 

7. The Sound and the Fury, telecast 6 Dec, 1955. NBC, Play- 
wrights '56. Producer, Fred Coe. Director, Vincent J. Done- 
hue. Adapted by Frank W. Durkee, Jr., from Faulkner's 
novel of the same name (New York, 1929). Cast includes 
Franchot Tone, Lillian Gish, and Ethel Waters. 

8. As I Lay Dying, telecast 7 Oct., 1956. CBS, Camera Three. 
Adapted by John McGiffert from Faulkner's novel of the 
same name. Cast includes Mildred Dunnock. 

g. Ad Astra, telecast 7 Sept., 1958. CBS, Camera Three. 
Adapted from Faulkner's story of the same name. Host, 
James Macandrew. Cast includes George Voskavek. 

10. The Tall Men, telecast 14 Sept., 1958. CBS, Camera Three. 
Adapted from Faulkner's story of the same name. Host, 
James Macandrew. Narrator, Richard Shepard. 

11. The Old Man, telecast 20 Nov., 1958. CBS, Playhouse go. 
Adapted by Horton Foote from the section entitled "Old 
Man" of Faulkner's novel, The Wild Palms. Producer, Fred 
Coe. Director, John Frankenheimer. Art director, Walter 
Scott Herndon. Cast includes Sterling Hayden and Ger- 
aldine Page. (Re-telecast 10 Sept., i95g.) 

12. Tomorrow, telecast 7 March, ig6o. CBS, Playhouse go. 
Adapted by Horton Foote from Faulkner's story of the 
same name. Producer, Herbert Brodkin. Director, Robert 
Mulligan. Cast includes Richard Boone, Kim Stanley, and 
Charles Bickford. 

11 The scripts of Smoke and Barn Burning were published in Visit to a Small 
Planet and Other Television Plays, by Gore Vidal (Boston: Little, Brown, 1956), 
from which some of the information given in this listing was derived. See also p. 48. 

163 



APPENDIX 

FAULKNER'S SHORT STORY SENDING 

SCHEDULE 



INTRODUCTION 

For a period of approximately two years during the early part 
of his career Faulkner kept on a sheet of cardboard a record of 
his attempts to place his short stories. Under fifteen headings — 
twelve magazines, an annual, and the names of two friends who 
served him occasionally as literary agents — he listed in his tiny, 
neat handwriting the titles of his stories as he sent them out, 
encircling them when they were accepted, crossing the titles out 
when they were rejected. For most of the stories Faulkner added 
the date — presumably the date when it was originally sent, not 
when it was accepted or rejected. 

The earliest date that appears on the schedule is January 23, 
1930; the latest is January g, 1932. Of a total of 129 entries, 
twenty-nine are undated, mostly at the beginning and the end of 
the record. From the rate at which he was sending out the stories, 
it is probable that the undated entries cover only a few weeks' 
time, and that the whole schedule covers a two-year period that 
began about the first of January, 1930. 

Despite the relatively brief period it covers, the schedule is an 
extremely interesting source of information concerning an im- 
portant part of Faulkner's literary career, and it is fortunate that 
he preserved it among his manuscripts. By the end of 1929, 
Faulkner had published four novels and written two more (the 
first version of Sanctuary and As I Lay Dying), but had made 
little money from them. He had published no stories. But at 
that time, barring the luck of producing a novel which would be 
a real commercial success, the best way of making a living from 
his writing would be the sale of short stories to magazines. (It is 
likely that Faulkner received more, on the average, from the 
sale of each of the four stories accepted by the Saturday Evening 
Post during the period covered by this schedule, than he did from 
any of his first five novels.) The luck of a commercial success, 
of course, came with his sixth novel, the revised Sanctuary. It was 
published in February 1931, a date that almost exactly divides in 
half the record of Faulkner's activity as a writer of short stories 
that is afforded by this schedule. A little over a year after the 
success of Sanctuary, he first went to Hollywood, which for the 
next decade and a half was to give him the opportunity to make 
the money, in short stints of writing for the films, to return home 
and write books. 

167 



Only five Faulkner short stories were published during the year 
that began with the appearance of "A Rose for Emily" in Forum 
(April, 1930) and ended with the success of Sanctuary, and a 
persistent legend has it that Faulkner collected rejection slips 
before Sanctuary for stories that he afterward sold, at fat prices, 
to the same editors who had previously rejected them. The legend, 
though it perhaps has a germ of truth, is not borne out by the 
statistics afforded by the sending schedule. It lists a total of forty- 
four separate titles, not counting minor or obvious variations. Of 
these forty-four, two can be proved to be alternate titles of other 
stories on the list. Of the forty-two remaining titles, twenty were 
published or accepted for publication during this two-year period, 
and ten were published later. Six titles are unpublished and are 
not known to survive; two others are unpublished but still exist 
in manuscript. Of the remaining four, two ("Dead Pilots" and 
"Point of Honor") may have been published under slightly dif- 
ferent names, or may be unpublished and have disappeared; one 
("Aria Con Amore") was marked accepted but was not pub- 
lished, at least under that title; one ("Peasants") was not marked 
accepted but may quite possibly have been published under a 
different name. This is an impressive list of stories, in number, 
even if a good many were written before 1930, and impressive 
too is the proportion known to have been published: thirty of 
the forty-two. 

But if only five had actually appeared before the publication 
of Sanctuary, eight had been accepted, and Faulkner marked only 
eight acceptances during the year following. (Several stories were 
published for the first time in the collection These 13 in Septem- 
ber 1931, but these were not recorded on the sending schedule.) 
Sanctuary may have helped the sale of Faulkner's stories, but there 
is little evidence that it did so in the first ten or twelve months 
after its publication. Of course, it may have raised prices some- 
what. But again this is doubtful, because the highest prices for 
fiction being paid by a magazine at that time were generally 
paid by the Saturday Evening Post, a fact that is reflected in the 
number of stories Faulkner submitted to it, according to the 
schedule: thirty-two separate submissions, with five acceptances. 
(One story, "Smoke," was submitted three times, presumably with 
some revision each time; two others were submitted twice.) But 
all five acceptances preceded the publication of Sanctuary, though 
Faulkner tried them with six stories afterward. 

168 



After the Post, Faulkner's favorite target was Scribner's, which 
also paid fairly well: twenty-six submissions, again including sev- 
eral more than once, with three acceptances. Third highest num- 
ber, sixteen, went to the American Mercury, which accepted four. 

In the two tables below the information from the sending sched- 
ule is recorded and annotated. The second table presents the 
entries just as Faulkner made them in the columns of the sched- 
ule, though for convenience I have rearranged the columns alpha- 
betically. The only information from the schedule omitted, in 
this table, is the brief address that Faulkner gave for most of 
the fifteen periodicals or persons. I have also expanded and nor- 
malized the titles for clarity (i.e., MERCURY to American Mer- 
cury). Below the column headings the only changes made were 
those made necessary by the change of manuscript to type, which 
are explained in footnotes, and in the omission of the neat, gen- 
erally one-line cancellation which Faulkner used to indicate the 
rejection of a story. All entries are presumed to be cancelled un- 
less there is a bracketed indication to the contrary. 

In the first table the titles which appear on the sending sched- 
ule are arranged alphabetically. Where a story appeared by more 
than one title, the entry appears under the main or final one, with 
the alternate appearing in smaller type only as a cross-reference. 
All titles are given just as they appear on the schedule; where, 
for convenience of reference or clarity, it seemed helpful, I have 
inserted, in reduced type and in brackets, the better-known title, 
with a cross-reference to the main entry. In the annotations under 
the main entries, I have tried to bring together the available evi- 
dence concerning the story, though many gaps remain to be filled. 

I. ALPHABETICAL LIST OF STORIES: 

"Ad Astra" Am. Merc. March 5, 1930; American Caravan* 
March 25, 1930. 

Publ. in American Caravan IV, New York, 1931. 

["All the Dead Pilots" see "Dead Pilots"] 

"Aria Con Amore" Sat. Eve. Post Feb. 2, 1931; Scribner's* Feb. 

*3> 193 1 - 

Though Faulkner encircled the title to indicate its acceptance by 
Scribner's, and though it does not appear again on the sending schedule, 

* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story on the sending 
schedule to show that it had been accepted. 

169 



Scribner's published no story by this title, by any author, and Faulkner 
has published no story by this title, anywhere. Nor do his unpublished 
manuscripts that I have seen afford any help. A possibly relevant piece 
of evidence is the fact that during the period covered by this sending 
schedule Faulkner published one story in Scribner's, "Spotted Horses" 
in the June 1931 issue, which appears by that name nowhere on the 
schedule. It might be tempting to speculate that "Aria Con Amore" 
was the original title, that it was accepted by Scribner's after being 
submitted in February 1931, and that it was published under the title 
"Spotted Horses" the following June. However, the title "Aria Con 
Amore" is a most unlikely one for "Spotted Horses." The title "Peasants" 
would be far more fitting, as Faulkner gives the title "The Peasants" to 
the section of The Hamlet in which he incorporated the final version 
of the story. "Peasants" appears, and is cancelled as rejected, in the 
Scribner's column of the schedule; possibly Faulkner erred in marking 
the one story as accepted, the other as rejected. Possibly he revised and 
resubmitted "Peasants" later, without recording the fact, and it was 
accepted and published as "Spotted Horses." Certainly "Peasants" and 
"Aria Con Amore" appear to be the only possibilities for the missing 
entry for "Spotted Horses" under Scribner's. But lacking further evidence 
we can only speculate. 

"Artist at Home" Sat. Eve. Post March 16, 1931; Scribner's June 

6, 1931; Ben Wasson [uncancelled; undated, but after June 5, 

i93i]- 

Publ. in Story, III (Aug. 1933). 

["Beyond" see "Beyond the gate"] 

"Beyond the gate" Sat. Eve. Post April 22, 1930. 

Publ. in Harper's, CLXVII (September 1933), entitled "Beyond." 
In the Faulkner collection are a typescript, entitled "Beyond the Gate," 
and a later manuscript, entitled "Beyond." 

"Big Shot" Am. Merc, [undated, but before Jan. 23, 1930]; Mis- 
cellany [undated, but before Feb. 5, 1930]; Liberty [undated, 
but before Feb. 14, 1930]; Forum [undated, but before March 

7, 1930]; Sat. Eve. Post April 14, 1930. 

Unpublished, but there is a typescript, entitled "The Big Shot," in 
the Faulkner collection. (See entry under the unpublished short story 
section of the manuscripts handlist.) 

"Black Music" Sat. Eve. Post July 27, 1931; Woman's Home 
Companion Aug. 7, 1931; Scribner's Sept. 1, 1931; Ben Wasson 
[uncancelled, undated]. 

Publ. in Doctor Martino and Other Stories, New York, 1934. 

"Brooch" Forum Jan. 29, 1931; College Humor Feb. 13, 1931. 

Faulkner's story "The Brooch" was published in Scribner's, XCIX 

(January 1936). Despite the disparity in dates, the likelihood of this 

170 



being the story published in 1936, or a version of it, is established by 
a manuscript note by Faulkner, dated January 1, 1931, on the verso of 
p. 7 of a carbon typescript of a version of this story in the Faulkner 
collection. 

"Built a Fence" Sat. Eve. Post Nov. 29, 1930 [entitled "Built 
Fence"]; Scribner's Dec. 20, 1930; Am. Merc. Jan. 29, 1931. 
Unpublished. 

"Centaur" Scribner's Aug. 11, 1931; Harper's Aug. 23, 1931; 
Am. Merc* Oct. 5, 1931. 

Publ., entitled "Centaur in Brass," in Am. Merc. XXV (Feb. 1932). 
["Centaur in Brass" see "Centaur"] 

"A Dangerous Man" Forum [undated, entitled "Dangerous 
Man"]; Am. Merc. Feb. 6, 1930. 

Unpublished. 

"Dead Pilots" Woman's Home Companion April 23, 1931. 

It would seem likely that this is the story "All the Dead Pilots" that 
was published in These 13, New York, 1931 (publication date was Sept. 
21). It is possible that the story was submitted to Collier's; see footnote 
ten. 

"Death Drag" Scribner's Dec. 16, 1930; Sat. Eve. Post Jan. 5, 

1931; Am. Merc. Feb. 1, 1931; Collier's April 5, 1931; Ben Was- 

son June 5, 1931; Scribner's* [undated, but between Sept. 1 and 

Oct. 16, 1931]; Ben Wasson* [undated, but after June 5, 1931]. 

Publ., entitled "Death-Drag," in Scribner's, XCI (Jan. 1932). On the 

sending schedule Faulkner encircled the title where it appeared in 

the column under the name of the agent who placed it, Wasson, and 

in the column under Scribner's he encircled it and added Wasson's name. 

The Collier's entry may instead refer to the Woman's Home Companion; 

see footnote nine. 

"Divorce in Naples" Forum May 21, 1930 [entitled "Equinox"]; 
Scribner's June 20, 1930; Am. Merc. June 30, 1930; Blues Oct. 
1, 1930; Ben Wasson April 7, 1931. 

Publ. in These 13, New York, 1931 (publication date was Sept. 21). 
A manuscript version in the Faulkner collection is entitled "Divorce 
in Naples," with the cancelled title "Equinox." 

"Dr Martino" Sat. Eve. Post March 5, 1931 [entitled "Martino"]; 
Woman's Home Companion March 16, 1931 [entitled "Mar- 
tino"]; Ben Wasson June 5, 1931; Sat. Eve. Post Sept. 1, 1931 
[entitled "Martino"]; Ben Wasson* [entitled "Martino"; un- 

* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story on the 
schedule to show that it had been accepted. 

171 



dated, but after June 5, 1931]; Harper's* [entitled "Martino"; 

undated]. 

Publ., entitled "Doctor Martino," in Harper's, CLXIII (Nov. 1931). 
On the sending schedule Faulkner encircled the title where it appeared 
the second time under the name of the agent who placed it, Wasson, and 
added the name "Harpers"; in the entry under Harper's he encircled 
it and added Wasson's name. 

"Drouth" Am. Merc. Feb. 8, 1930; Forum March 7, 1930; Scrib- 
ner's April 21, 1930; Scribner's* May 1, 1930. 

Publ., entitled "Dry September," in Scribner's, LXXXIX (Jan. 1931). 
A manuscript version in the Faulkner collection is entitled "Drouth." 

["Dry September" see "Drouth"] 

"Dull Tale" Sat. Eve. Post Nov. 14, 1930. 
Unpublished. 

["Elly" see "Selvage"] 

"Equinox" see "Divorce in Naples" 

"Evangeline" Sat. Eve. Post July 17, 1931; Woman's Home Com- 
panion July 26, 1931. 
Unpublished. 

"Fire & Clock" Am. Merc. Jan. 23, 1930; Sat. Eve. Post Feb. 6, 
1930; College Humor Feb. 14, 1930; Cosmopolitan March 1, 

i93°- 

Unpublished. 

"Fox" see "Fox Hunt" 

"Fox Hunt" Forum [entitled "The Fox"; undated, but before 
March 7, 1930]; Miscellany [entitled "Fox"; undated, but be- 
fore Feb. 5, 1930]; Liberty [entitled "Fox"; undated, but before 
Feb. 14, 1930]; Sat. Eve. Post Dec. 29, 1930 [entitled "Fox"]; 
College Humor January 9, 1931 [entitled "A Fox"]; Woman's 
Home Companion March 11, 1931 [entitled "Fox-Hunt"]; 
Ben Wasson* April 7, 1931; Harper's* [entitled "Foxhunt"; 
undated]. 

Publ. in Harper's, CLXIII (Sept. 1931). On the sending schedule 
Faulkner encircled the title where it appeared in the column under the 
name of the agent who placed it, Wasson, and in the column under 
Harper's he encircled it and added Wasson's name. 

"Hair" Am. Merc. March 20, 1930; Sat. Eve. Post April 3, 1930; 
Sat. Eve. Post January 1, 1931; Woman's Home Companion 

* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story on the 
schedule to show that it had been accepted. 

172 



January 10, 1931; Scribner's January 29, 1931; Am. Merc* 
Feb. 27, 1931. 

Publ. in Am. Merc, XXIII (May 1931). 

"Honor" Scribner's March 25, 1930; Am. Merc* April 22, 1930. 
Publ. in Am. Merc, XX (July 1930). It would seem very likely that 
this is the same story as "Point of Honor," submitted to the Sat. Eve. Post 
March 7, 1930. 

"The Hound" Sat. Eve. Post Nov. 17, 1930; Scribner's Nov. 29, 
1930 [entitled "Hound"]; Am. Merc. Jan. 29, 1931 [entitled 
"Hound"]; Ben Wasson* April 7, 1931 [entitled "Hound"]; 
Harper's* [undated; entitled "Hound"]. 

Publ. in Harper's, CLXIII (Aug. 1931). On the sending schedule 
Faulkner encircled the title where it appeared under the name of the 
agent who placed it, Wasson, and in the column under Harper's he 
encircled it and added Wasson's name. 

"Idyll in Desert" Am. Merc, [undated, but before Jan. 23, 
1930]; Liberty [undated, but before Feb. 14, 1930]; Forum 
[undated, but before March 7, 1930]; Sat. Eve. Post Feb. 4, 
1931; Scribner's March 2, 1931; Harper's April 18, 1931; 
Woman's Home Companion [undated, but between April 1 1 
and 23, 1931]; Ben Wasson* June 5, 1931. 

Publ., entitled Idyll in the Desert, in a limited edition by Random 
House, New York, 1931 (publication date was Dec. 10). 

"A Justice" Woman's Home Companion April 11, 1931; 
Harper's May 5, 1931 [entitled "Justice"]. 

Publ. in These 13, New York, 1931 (publication date was Sept. 21). 

"The Leg" Sat. Eve. Post Dec. 14, 1930; Scribner's June 8, 1931; 
Ben Wasson [uncancelled; undated, but after June 5, 1931]. 
Publ., entitled "Leg," in Doctor Martino and Other Stories, New York, 
1934. The reprinting in the 1950 Collected Stories is entitled "The Leg." 

"Lizards" Sat. Eve. Post May 27, 1930; Sat. Eve. Post* Aug. 7, 
1930 [entitled "Lizards in"]. 

Publ., entitled "Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard," in Sat. Eve. Post, 
CCIV (Feb. 27, 1932). For a change in the date this story was first 
submitted to the Post, see footnote four in Table II below. 

["Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard" see "Lizards"] 
"Martino see "Dr Martino" 

"Miss Z. Gant" Am. Merc, [undated, but before Jan. 23, 1930]; 
Scribner's [undated, but before March 25, 1930]; Miscellany 
Feb. 5, 1930; Southwest Review* March 16, 1930. 

* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story on the 
schedule to show that it had been accepted. 

173 



Publ., entitled Miss Zilphia Gant, by the Book Club of Texas, [Dallas,] 
1932, with a Preface by Henry Nash Smith. According to Mr. Smith, 
Faulkner was asked to submit a story to the Southwest Review, then 
edited by Smith and John McGinnis. When the typescript of "Miss 
Zilphia Gant" arrived, the editors liked it, but felt that it might offend 
some readers, and persuaded the Book Club of Texas to bring it out 
instead, an arrangement that was satisfactory to Faulkner. (Letter from 
Henry Nash Smith to JBM, June 15, i960.) 

"Mistral" Sat. Eve. Post June 19, 1930; Scribner's July 12, 1930. 
Publ. in These 13, New York, 1931. The Scribner's entry was cancelled 
with many lines, apparently to obliterate the entry rather than to indicate 
rejection of the story. 

"Mountain Victory" Sat. Eve. Post* September 24, 1930 [date 
cancelled, and above it inserted the new date October 4, 1930]. 
Publ., entitled "A Mountain Victory," in Sat. Eve. Post, CCV (Dec. 
3' 1932)- 

"Peasants" Scribner's Aug. 25, 1930. 

No Faulkner story by this title has been published, but it possibly 
refers to "Spotted Horses," which was originally published in Scribner's 
in June 1931, and appeared, revised, as an episode in the section entitled 
"The Peasants" of the novel The Hamlet, New York, 1940. 

If this is so, there remain several unsolved problems connected with 
the listing here. Why is there no entry for "Spotted Horses"? Why does 
Faulkner mark as accepted by Scribner's a story, "Aria Con Amore" 
(q.v.), which was not published, at least under that title? 

"Per Ardua" Sat Eve. Post Feb. 5, 1930; Liberty Feb. 14, 1930; 
Scribner's Aug. 30, 1930; Liberty Dec. 30, 1930. 

Unpublished. Though the Royal Air Force motto, "Per ardua ad 
astra," supplied the title for another Faulkner story, "Ad Astra" (q.v.), 
that these are two stories, not one story with alternate titles, is indicated 
by the fact that Faulkner was still submitting "Per Ardua" after "Ad 
Astra" had been accepted. 

"Point of Honor" Sat. Eve. Post March 7, 1930. 

Unpublished. However, the similarity of this title to "Honor" (q.v.) 
and the way it fits into the dates at which that story was sent out, argue 
rather strongly that the two titles belong to the same story. 

"Red Leaves" Sat. Eve. Post* July 24, 1930. 
Publ. in Sat. Eve. Post, CCIII (Oct. 25, 1930). 

"Rose for Emily" Scribner's [undated, but before March 25, 

1930]; Forum* [undated, but before March 7, 1930; Faulkner 

noted it elsewhere as sold to Forum on Jan. 20, 1930. See p. 85. 

Publ., entitled "A Rose for Emily," in Forum, LXXXIII (April 1930). 

* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story on the 
schedule to show that it had been accepted. 

174 



"Rose of Lebanon" Sat. Eve. Post Nov. 7, 1930; Woman's Home 
Companion Jan. 10, 1931; Scribner's July 23, 1931. 

Unpublished, but there is a manuscript in the Faulkner collection. 

"Selvage" Scribner's [entitled "Salvage"; undated, but before 
March 25, 1930]; Forum April 16, 1930; Liberty May 2, 1930. 
Unpublished under this title, and in this form. But in the Faulkner 
collection are a manuscript and a typescript, entitled "Selvage," and a 
manuscript, entitled "Elly," which is a substantial revision of "Selvage." 
The story "Elly" was published in Story, IV (Feb. 1934), somewhat re- 
vised from the manuscript. 

"Smoke" Sat. Eve Post [undated, but before Feb. 5, 1930]; Sat. 
Eve. Post Dec. 22, 1930; Sat. Eve. Post Oct. 5, 1931; Scribner's 
Oct. 16, 1931 [uncancelled]. 

Publ. in Harper's, CLXIV (April 1932). 

["Spotted Horses" see "Peasants"] 

"That Evening Sun" Scribner's Oct. 6, 1930; Am. Merc* Oct. 
28, 1930 [entitled "That Eve. Sun"]. 

Publ., entitled "That Evening Sun Go Down," in Am. Merc, XXII 
(March 1931). 

["There Was a Queen" see "Was a Queen"] 

"Thrift" Sat. Eve. Post* Feb. 14, 1930. 

Publ. in Sat. Eve. Post, CCIII (Sept. 6, 1930). 

"Two on Bench" Sat. Eve. Post Sept. 12, 1930 [entitled "2 
Bench"]; Scribner's Sept. 24, 1930. 

Unpublished under this title, and in this form. But in the Faulkner 
Collection at the University of Texas is an incomplete manuscript, en- 
titled "Bench for Two," which became, substantially revised, the story 
"Pennsylvania Station," published in Am. Merc, XXXI (Feb. 1934). 

"Thru the Window" see "Was a Queen" 

"Turn About" Ben Wasson Jan. 9, 1932 [uncancelled]. 
Publ. in Sat. Eve. Post, CCIV (March 5, 1932). 

"Was a Queen" Scribner's [entitled "Thru the Window"; un- 
dated, but before March 25, 1930]; Sat. Eve. Post Aug. 23, 1930; 
Hal Smith Sept. 12, 1930 [uncancelled]; Ben Wasson [uncan- 
celled; undated, but after June 5, 1931]. 

Publ., entitled "There Was a Queen," in Scribner's XCIII (January 
1933). The manuscript of an early version of this story in the Faulkner 
collection bears the cancelled title "Through the Window." 

• An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story on the 
schedule to show that it had been accepted. 

175 



II. ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PLACES SENT: 



A. 


Agents: 
Hal Smith 






Was a Queen 


9-12-30 [uncancelled] 




Ben Wasson 






Divorce in Naples 


i 4-7-31 




Hound* 


»1 




Fox Hunt* 


99 




Dr Martino 


6-5-3 1 




Death Drag 


11 




Idyll in Desert* 


n 




Martino* - Harpers 1 




Black Music 


[uncancelled] 




Death Drag* 






Was a Queen 


[uncancelled] 




Artist at Home 


[uncancelled] 




The Leg 


[uncancelled] 




Turn About 


1-9-32 [uncancelled] 


B. 


Annual: 
American Caravan 






Ad Astra* 


3-25-30 


C. 


Magazines: 

American Mercury 
Big Shot 
Miss Z. Gant 
Idyll in Desert 






Fire & Clock 


1-23-30 




A Dangerous Man 


2-6-30 




Drouth 


2-8-30 




Ad Astra 


3-5-30 




Hair 


3-20-30 




Honor* 


4-22-30 




Divorce in Naples 


6-30-30 



* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story to show that 
it had been accepted. 

1 Faulkner added the name of the magazine with which Wasson placed the story 
in this case, encircling the title of both story and magazine. 

176 



That Eve. Sun - * 


10-28-30 


Hound 


1-29-31 


Built a Fence 


1-29-31 


Death Drag 


2-1-31 2 


Hair* 


2-27-31 


Centaur* 


10-5-31 


Blues 




Divorce in Naples 


10-1-30 


College Humor 




Fire & Clock 


2-14-30 


A Fox 


1-9-3 1 


Brooch 


2-13-31 



[Collier's see "Death Drag" and "Dead Pilots" under Woman's 
Home Companion] 



Cosmopolitan 




Fire & Clock 


3-1-30 


Forum 




Big Shot 




The Fox 




Dangerous Man 




Rose for Emily* 




Idyll in Desert 




Drouth 


3-7-30 


Selvage 


4-16-30 


Equinox 


5-21-30 


Brooch 


1-29-31 


Harper's 




Idyll in Desert 


4-18-31 


Justice 


5-5-3 1 


Centaur 


8-23-31 


Foxhunt* Wasson 3 




Hound* 




Martino* 





* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story to show that 
it had been accepted. 

2 Faulkner appears first to have dated this entry 2-3-31, then to have cancelled the 
first 3 and written a 1 before it. 

3 For these three titles Faulkner listed the agent who had placed them with the 
magazine. 

177 



Liberty 




Big Shot 




Fox 




Idyll in Desert 




Per Ardua 


2-14-30 


Selvage 


5-2-30 


Per Ardua 


12-30-30 


Miscellany 




Big Shot 




Fox 




Miss Z. Gant 


2-5-30 


Saturday Evening Post 




Smoke 




Per Ardua 


2-5-30 


Fire & Clock 


2-6-30 


Thrift* 


2-14-30 


Point of Honor 


3-7-30 


Hair 


4-3-30 


Big Shot 


4-14-30 


Beyond the gate 


4-22-30 


Lizards 


5-27-30 4 


Mistral 


6-19-30 


Red Leaves* 


7-24-30 


Lizards in* 


8-7-30 


Was a Queen 


8-23-30 


2 Bench 


9-12-30 


Mountain Victory* 


10-4-30 5 


Rose of Lebanon 


11-7-30 


Dull Tale 


11-14-30 


The Hound 


11-17-30 


Built Fence 


11-29-30 


The Leg 


12-14-30 


Smoke 


12-22-30 


Fox 


12-29-30 


Hair 


1-1-31 



* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story to show that 
it had been accepted. 

* Faulkner first dated this story 5-16-30, then cancelled the 16 and inserted the 
27 above it. 

5 Faulkner first dated this entry 9-24-30, then cancelled the whole date and inserted 
the 10-4-30 above it. 

178 



Death Drag 


1-5-3 1 




Aria Con Amore 


2-2-31 




Idyll in Desert 


2-4-31 




Martino 


3-5-3 1 




Artist at Home 


3-16-31 




Evangeline 


7-17-31 




Black Music 


7-27-31 




Martino 


9-1-31 




Smoke 


10-5-31 




Scribner's Magazine 






Thru the Window 






Miss Z. Gant 






Rose for Emily 






Salvage 






Honor 


3-25-30 




Drouth 


4-21-30 




Drouth* 


5-i-3o 




Divorce in Naples 


6-20-30 




Mistral 


7-12-30 6 




Peasants 


8-25-30 




Per Ardua 


8-30-30 




Two on Bench 


9-24-30 




That Evening Sun 


10-6-30 




Hound 


11-29-30 




Built a Fence 


12-20-30 




Death Drag 


12-16-30 




Hair 


1-29-31 




Aria Con Amore* 


2-13-31 




Idyll in Desert - 


3-2-31 




Artist at Home 


6-6-31 




The Leg 


6-8-31 




Rose of Lebanon 


7-23-31 




Centaur 


8-11-31 




Black Music 


9-i-3i 




Death Drag* - Wasson 7 






Smoke 


10-16-31 


[uncancelled] 



* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story to show that 
it had been accepted. 

6 This title and date were cancelled with many lines, apparently to obliterate the 
entry rather than to indicate rejection of the story 

7 Faulkner here added to the title the name of the agent who had placed the story 
with this magazine. 

179 



Southwest Review 

Miss Z. Gant* 3-16-30 

Woman's Home Companion 

Hair 1-10-31 8 
Rose of Lebanon 8 

Fox-Hunt 3-11-31 

Martino 3-16-31 

Death Drag - Colliers 9 4-5-31 

A Justice 4-11-31 
Idyll in Desert 

Dead Pilots 10 4-23-31 

Evangeline 7-26-31 

Black Music 8-7-31 

* An asterisk indicates that Faulkner encircled the title of the story to show that 
it had been accepted. 

8 Faulkner used a ligature to indicate that this date went with both "Hair" and 
"Rose of Lebanon." 

9 The addition of the name of this magazine, which belonged to the same company 
as did The Woman's Home Companion, may mean that Faulkner submitted it first 
to one and then the other, or that he sent it only to Collier's. The address was the 
same for both magazines. 

10 After this title and slightly above the line Faulkner added a capital C, encircled. 
One possibility might be that it stands for Collier's (see preceding footnote). 



180 



INDEX 



INDEX OF PERSONS 

Not indexed are: actors, writers, and other movie personnel in 
Parts I and V; editors, translators, and writers of introductions 
for foreign editions in Parts I, III, and IV; individuals to whom 
acknowledgment is made for items lent to the exhibition or as- 
sistance rendered to this book. 



Aiken, Conrad, Faulkner's essay on Turns 
and Movies by, 8 

Anderson, Sherwood, 5, 11, 12, 14; Faulk- 
ner's letter on Al Jackson legend to, 
12; letter reproduced, Figs. 27-9 

Ayres, Lemuel, letter to Faulkner on 
stage production of Requiem for a 
Nun, 78-9 

Brown, Margaret, Faulkner writes child- 
ren's story "The Wishing-Tree" for, 

35 
Carter, Hodding 38, 50 

CHARACTERS IN FAULKNER'S FICTION: 

Beauchamp, Samuel Worsham 61 

Benbow, Narcissa 43 

Compson, Benjamin 17 

Comyn 15 

Cotton, Ernest 41 

Habersham, Miss 32 

[Hampton,] sheriff 32 

Jackson family 12 

McCaslin-Beauchamp family genealogy 

3i 
Mallison, Charles 34 
Ratliff, V.K. 41, 42, 43 
Sartoris family 43 
Sartoris, Bayard (son of Colonel John) 

3i 

Sartoris, Bayard (great-grandson of 
Colonel John) 15, 35 

Sartoris, Mrs. Bayard see Narcissa Ben- 
bow 

Sartoris, Evelyn 15 

Sartoris, Colonel John 15, 16 

Sartoris, John (great-grandson of Colo- 
nel John) 15 

Snopes family 6, 29, 40-44 

Snopes, Ab 42-3 

Snopes, Byron 40, 42, 44; his four 
children, 44 

Snopes, Clarence 40, 43 

Snopes, Colonel Sartoris 43, 62 

Snopes, Flem 40, 41, 42 



Snopes, I. O. 40, 42 

Snopes, Launcelot ("Lump") 30 

Snopes, Mink 41 

Snopes, Montgomery Ward 40 

Snopes, Mordred ("Maud") 30 

Snopes, Virgil 40 

Stevens, Gavin 32, 33 

Suratt, V. K. see Ratliff 

Sutpen, Henry Coldfield 61 

Sutpen, Thomas 26, 35 

Weddel, Charles 34 

Cochran, Louis 9 

Coindreau, Maurice, translator of Faulk- 
ner's works into French, 18, 20, 21, 23, 
29. 38, 43- 83. 123 n - 

Collins, Carvel, review of Mirrors of 
Chartres Street, 46 

Commins, Saxe, Faulkner's editor, 5, 36, 
39. 45 

Covarrubias, Miguel 1 1 

Eliot, T. S., Faulkner quotes from "Mr. 
Eliot's Sunday Morning Service" by, 36 

Falkner, Murry C, father of William 
Faulkner, 5, 7 

Falkner, William C, great-grandfather 
of William Faulkner, 15-6 

Faulkner, Jill, daughter of William 
Faulkner, 49, 50 

Faulkner, William: spelling of name, 
Falkner or Faulkner, 7; photographs 
of, 50, 51, 54; photograph of repro- 
duced, 7; drawing of, 12; drawing of 
reproduced, 11; birthplace New Al- 
bany, Miss., 5; moves to Oxford, Miss., 
5; serves in RAF in World War I, 7, 
25; student at University of Missis- 
sippi after war, 5, 7; member student 
dramatic group, The Marionettes, 8, 
9; in New Orleans in 1925, 5, 10, 23; 
trip to Europe in 1925, 13; draws on 
native region for fiction, 5-6, 14-15; 
writes for Hollywood, 47, 155-62, 167; 



183 



writes for television, 155; wins Nobel 
Prize in 1950, 5, 49; awarded Legion 
of Honor, 49; commencement address- 
es at daughter's graduation from high 
school and junior college, 49, 50; other 
addresses 50-1; twice wins National 
Book Award, 50; other awards 50-2; 
trip to Japan for State Department in 
•955> 46, 53, 6on.; trip to Greece for 
State Department in 1957, 51 

Ford, Ruth, adapts and acts in Requiem 
for a Nun, 36n. 

Garrett, George P. 59n. 

Gilmore, Sam 24, go 

Green, Raymond 9, 10 

Jelliffe, Robert A. 6on. 

McClure, John, review of The Marble 
Faun, 10; review of Sherwood Ander- 
son & Other Famous Creoles, 11 

O'Neill, Eugene, Faulkner's article on, 8 



Pearson, Norman Holmes 59n. 

Romaine, Paul 45 

Roth, Russell 5gn. 

Scott, Zachary 47, 159 

Shenton, Edward, illustrator of works by 

Faulkner, 27, 31, 39 
Sidney, George 156, 157, 158, 159, 160 
Smith, Harrison 175 
Smith, Henry Nash sgn., 61, 174 
Spratling, William, 11, 12, 13; Faulkner 

writes introduction for his book of 

drawings, Sherwood Anderson & Other 

Famous Creoles, 11-12 
Stone, Phil 9, 10, 29 
Stone, Philip Alston 29, 35 
Verlaine, Paul 8 
Walser, Richard 52 
Wasson, Ben 8, 17, 38, 81, 170, 171, 172, 

173. 175 
Wolfe, Thomas 52 



184 



INDEX OF WORKS BY FAULKNER 



PUBLISHED BOOKS: 

Absalom, Absalom! 6, 13, 35, 61; ex. cat. 
26-7; manuscript 26, 67; reproduction 
of manuscript listed, 5911.; typescript 
26, 67-8; typescript reproduced, Fig. 14; 
Engl, issue 108-9; translations 27, 127, 
129, 133, 135, 139. i4». 144; Faulkner 
collaborates on unproduced screenplay 
of, 92-3, 160 

As I Lay Dying 6, 22, 40, 167; ex. cat. 
17-8; manuscript 18, 65-66; reproduc- 
tions of manuscript listed, sgn., 66n.; 
typescript 18, 60, 66; Engl. eds. 107, 
113; translations 18, 125, 127, 129, 131, 
132- !33. !3 8 - !39. ML MG, 147; Faulk- 
ner's letter to Maurice E. Coindreau 
on translation of, 18, i8n.; television 
play based on, 163 

Big Woods ex. cat. 39-40; manuscript 39; 
setting copy 39, 79-80; Edward Shen- 
ton's drawings for, 39-40; page and 
foundry proof, 80; no translation of, 
125; see also the following short stories 
incorporated in this book: "The Bear," 
"The Old People," "A Bear Hunt," 
and "Race at Morning"; see also the 
stories "Delta Autumn," "A Justice," 
and "Red Leaves," the article "Missis- 
sippi" and the novel Requiem for a 
Nun, from which excerpts were incor- 
porated in this book 

Collected Stories 39, 45, 173; ex. cat. 34- 
5; for individual stories included in 
this volume see "Artist at Home," 
"Barn Burning," "A Bear Hunt," "The 
Brooch," "Centaur in Brass," "A Court- 
ship," "Mule in the Yard," "My Grand- 
mother Millard," "Pennsylvania Sta- 
tion," "Shall Not Perish," "Shingles 
for the Lord," "The Tall Men," and 
the stories listed under These ij and 
Doctor Martino and Other Stories 

Doctor Martino and Other Stories 33, 82, 
84, 170, 173; ex. cat. 24-5; Engl, issues 
105-6, 115; translation 25, 127, 133; see 
also the individual stories that make 
up this collection: "Beyond," "Black 
Music," "Death Drag," "Doctor Mar- 
tino," "Elly," "Fox Hunt," "Honor," 



"The Hound," "Leg," "Mountain Vic- 
tory," "Smoke," "There Was a Queen," 
"Turnabout," and "Wash" 

A Fable ex. cat. 38-9; manuscript 39, 79; 
typescript 38-9, 79; Engl. ed. 113; trans- 
lations 38, 127, 129, 130, 131, 133, 135, 
142, 143, 146, 148; episode from publ. 
as Notes on a Horsethicf, 38, 125; re- 
production of Faulkner's working notes 
for listed, 6on. 

Go Down, Moses 6, 34, 61; ex. cat. 30-2; 
typescript page of "The Bear," 74; 
setting copy 31, 60, 75; galley proof 75; 
Faulkner's manuscript genealogical 
note for, 31, 75; Faulkner's instruc- 
tions to printer on "The Bear," 31; 
Engl. eds. 110-11; translations 32, 127, 
133, 135, 139, 146, 148; excerpts incor- 
porated in Big Woods, 39; see also the 
following short stories incorporated in 
this book: "An Absolution," "The 
Bear," "Delta Autumn," "The Fire on 
the Hearth," "Go Down, Moses," "Gold 
Is Not Always," "Lion," "The Old 
People," "Pantaloon in Black," "A 
Point of Law," and "Was" 

A Green Bough 12; ex. cat. 23-4; type- 
scripts of poems collected in, 88, 89, 
go, 91; typescript of poem collected in 
reproduced, Fig. 4; translations 24, 127, 
»33. 135-6. 148 

The Hamlet 6, 34, 35, 40, 41, 43, 174; 
ex. cat. 29-30; manuscript 29-30, 61, 
70-71; reproduction of manuscript list- 
ed, 7 m.; discussion of changes in struc- 
ture revealed by manuscript, 61-2; 
typescript 29, 30, 71-3, 87; Faulkner 
inscribes carbon typescript for Philip 
Alston Stone, his godson, 29; manu- 
script and typescript of partial early 
version, entitled "Father Abraham," 
41 (reproduction, Fig. 18); typescript 
of partial early version, entitled "Abra- 
ham's Children," 41, 69 (reproduction, 
Fig. 19); Engl. ed. 110; translations 30, 
127, 129, 133, 136, 139, 146, 148; motion 
picture of, entitled The Long Hot 
Summer, 161; see also the short stories 
incorporated in this novel, "Afternoon 



185 



of a Cow," "Barn Burning," "Fool 
about a Horse," "The Hound," "Liz- 
ards in Jamshyd's Courtyard," and 
"Spotted Horses" 
Idyll in the Desert see under short 

STORIES 

Intruder in the Dust ex. cat. 32-3; manu- 
script 32, 75; typescript 32, 75-6; repro- 
duction of typescript listed, 76n.; Engl, 
eds. 111; translations 32, 33, 127, 129, 
130, 131, 132, 133, 136, 138, 140, 142, 
144, 147, 148, 150; motion picture of, 
48, 161 

Knight's Gambit ex. cat. 33-4; setting 
copy 77-8; dead matter, samples, and 
layout 78; Engl. ed. 111-2; translations 
34, 127, 129, 132, 133, 142; title story 
(short novel) based on unpubl. short 
story of same title, 33, 34, 77-8; see 
also the short stories included in this 
collection: "An Error in Chemistry," 
"Hand upon the Waters," "Monk," 
"Smoke," and "Tomorrow" 

Light in August 6; ex. cat. 22-3; manu- 
script 22, 23, 60, 66-7; typescript 60, 
67; Engl. eds. 22, 104-5; translations 
22, 23, 125, 127-8, 129, 130, 131, 132, 

133. 136- »3 8 . »40, 143. »44- »47. 150; 
motion picture rights sold, 162; dis- 
carded title "Dark House," 67 

The Mansion 44, 44n.; reproduction of 
typescript listed, 5gn.; Engl. ed. 116; 
translations 125 

The Marble Faun 5, 12, 24, 29; ex. cat. 
9-10; typescript 10; typescript repro- 
duced, Fig. 26; date written, 10 

Miss Zilphia Gant see under short 
stories 

Mosquitoes 5, 13; ex. cat. 12; manuscript 
missing, 60; typescript 12, 60, 61, 64; 
typescript reproduced, Fig. 6; transla- 
tions 128, 129, 133, 140, 146; Al Jack- 
son legend in, 12 

Notes on a Horsethief see A Fable 

Pylon 25; ex. cat. 25-6; manuscript 26, 
5gn., 60, 67; reproduction of manu- 
script, Fig. 13; typescript 25, 67; Engl, 
eds. 106-7, llf >: translations 25, 26, 128, 
132, 134, 136, 140, 141, 142, 146; mo- 
tion picture of, entitled The Tarnished 
Angels, 161 

Requiem for a Nun (novel) ex. cat. 36-8; 
manuscript 36, 78; typescript 36, 78; 
galley proof 36, 78; reproduction of 



galley proof, Fig. 22; Faulkner's note 
to his editor on, 36, 6on.; Engl. eds. 
112; translations 37-8, 128, 129, 134, 
136, 140, 144, 147, 148; motion picture 
rights sold, 162; a part incorporated in 
Big Woods, 79 

• (play version) Ruth Ford's adap- 



tation, 36n.; translations 37, 130, 134, 
136; productions listed, 36n.-37n.; 
Faulkner attends Greek production, 
51; program and poster of French pro- 
duction, 37; program, poster, and pho- 
tographs of German production, 37; 
letter to Faulkner from Lemuel Ayres 
on, 78-9 

Sanctuary 6, 20, 40, 47, 167, 168; ex. cat. 
18-20; manuscript 19, 59-60, 66; manu- 
script reproduced, Fig. 12; reproduc- 
tion of manuscript listed, 66n.; type- 
script 19, 60, 66; galley proof of first 
version, 19; Engl. eds. 102-3, 11 ^» 117; 
translations 20, 125, 128, 129, 130, 
131, 132, 134, 136, 138, 140, 142, 143, 
144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 150; motion 
picture of, entitled The Story of Tem- 
ple Drake, 48, 161; Faulkner's intro- 
duction to Modern Library issue of, 
17, 18-9 

Sartoris 5, 6, 13, 14, 16, 35, 40, 41; ex. 
cat. 14-6; manuscript 15, 59, 61, 64; 
manuscript reproduced, Fig. 9; type- 
script 15, 60, 64-5; typescript repro- 
duced, Fig. 8; Engl, issue 103-4; trans- 
lations 15, 128, 129, 134, 140, 145, 147; 
originally entitled "Flags in the Dust," 
15, 64, 65; first book of Yoknapatawpha 
series, 5-6; Faulkner bases part of mo- 
tion picture script on, 160 

Soldiers' Pay 5, 10, 13, 14; ex. cat. 12; 
manuscript missing, 60; typescript 12, 
60, 61, 63; reproduction of typescript, 
Fig. 5; Engl. eds. 101; translations 128, 
129, 134, 137, 140, 142, 143, 146 

The Sound and the Fury 6, 17, 40; ex. 
cat. 16-17; manuscript 17, 59, 65; manu- 
script reproduced, Figs. 10, 11; repro- 
duction of manuscript listed, 65n.; 
typescript 17, 60, 65; Engl. eds. 102; 
translations 17, i23n., 128, 130, 134, 
137, 140, 149, 150; Faulkner's unpubl. 
letter to Ben Wasson on, 17; projected 
1933 Random House ed. of, 16, 17; 
Faulkner's unpubl. note on quoted 



186 



from, 16; motion picture of, 161-2; 
television play of, 163 

These ij 81, 82, 83, 84, 86, 168, 171, 
173, 174; ex. cat. 20-1; Engl, issue 105, 
114-5; translations 21, 128, 130, 134, 
141; see also the individual stones 
that make up this collection: "Ad 
Astra," "All the Dead Pilots," "Car- 
cassonne," "Crevasse," "Divorce in 
Naples," "Dry September," "Hair," "A 
Justice," "Mistral," "Red Leaves," "A 
Rose for Emily," "That Evening Sun," 
and "Victory" 

The Town 5, 6, 13, 40, 41; ex. cat. 44-5; 
manuscript worksheet for, 44, 6on.; 
typescript 44, 80; galley proof 44, 45, 
80; reproductions of galley proof listed, 
8on.; page proof 45, 80; foundry proof 
45, 80; specifications print sample, 80; 
Engl. ed. 113-4; translations 128, 137, 

146, 147, 149, 150; final episode, en- 
titled "The Waifs," published in mag- 
azine, 44; line omitted from first print- 
ing, 45; see also the two short stories 
incorporated in this novel, "Centaur 
in Brass" and "Mule in the Yard" 

The Unvanquished 31, 34, 39, 42, 43; 
ex. cat. 27-8; manuscript (of final 
chapter, "An Odor of Verbena") 27, 
68; typescript (of final chapter, "An 
Odor of Verbena") 27, 60, 68; Engl, 
eds. 109, 116; translations 27-8, 128, 131, 

134. '37- »3 8 . 139. 141. 143. 145. "46. 

147, 149; motion picture rights sold, 
162; see also the following short stories 
incorporated in this novel: "Skirmish 
at Sartoris," "The Unvanquished," and 
"Vendee" 

The Wild Palms ex. cat. 28-9; manuscript 
28, 60, 68-9; typescript 28, 69; Engl, 
eds. 109-10, 117; translations 29, 125, 
128, 130, 132, 134, 137, 141, 142, 144, 

148, 149, 150; translation of "Old Man" 
section, 145; television play of "Old 
Man," 163; Faulkner's unproduced tel- 
evision treatment of "Old Man," 92; 
discarded title "If I Forget Thee, Je- 
rusalem" 28, 69 

UNPUBLISHED BOOKS: 

"Abraham's Children" see under The 
Hamlet 



"The American Dream" (projected col- 
lection of essays) 53 

"The Devil Beats His Wife" (unfinished 
novel?) manuscript 81 

"Elmer" (unfinished novel) 13; manu- 
script 81; typescript 13, 81; reproduc- 
tion of typescript, Fig. 7; central char- 
acter of lives in Jefferson, Mississippi, 
in one version, 13 

"Father Abraham" see under The Ham- 
let 

"The Marionettes" (play) manuscript 
booklet 8-9; reproduction, Fig. 1 

ANTHOLOGIES: 

Faulkner at Nagano 46, 52, 53, 6on. 

Faulkner's County 113 

The Indispensable Faulkner 46 

Jealousy and Episode 46 

Mirrors of Chartres Street 46; review by 
Carvel Collins of, 46 

New Orleans Sketches (Toyko) 46 

New Orleans Sketches (London) 115-6 

A Rose for Emily and Other Stories 45 

Salmagundi 45 

Viking Portable Faulkner 13, 46; type- 
script 93 

SHORT STORIES: 

"An Absolution" (also entitled "Apo- 
theosis") typescript 31, 73; reproduc- 
tion of typescript, Fig. 17; relationship 
to "The Fire on the Hearth" and Go 
Down, Moses, 74 

"Ad Astra" 15, 21, 35, 169, 176; manu- 
script 21, 81; Faulkner bases motion 
picture script on, 160; television play 
based on, 163; title derived from RAF 
motto, 174 

"Adolescence" (unpubl.) typescript 86 

"Afternoon of a Cow" 29, 43; typescript 

43 
"All the Dead Pilots" 35, 169, 171; manu- 
script 81; Faulkner bases motion pic- 
ture script on, 160 
"Apotheosis" see "An Absolution" 
"Aria con Amore" (unpubl.) 168, 169- 

70. 174 
"Artist at Home" 170; manuscript 81 
"Barn Burning" 29; manuscript 29, 43, 

70; reproduction of manuscript, Fig. 

15; typescript 29, 70; television play 



187 



based on, 162-3; originally planned as 
first chapter of The Hamlet 43, 62 

"The Bear" (Sat. Eve. Post version) 31, 
39; relationship to "Lion" and the 
chapter of Go Down, Moses entitled 
"The Bear," 31 

"The Bear" (Go Down, Moses version) 
see under Go Down, Moses 

"The Bear" (Big Woods version) tear- 
sheets used as setting copy, 79 

"A Bear Hunt" 39; tearsheets used as 
setting copy in Big Woods, 79 

"Bench for Two" see "Two on Bench" 

"Beyond" (also entitled "Beyond the 
Gate") 170; manuscript 81; typescript 
81 

"The Big Shot" (unpubl.) 170; type- 
script, 35, 87 

"Black Music" 170; manuscript 82 

"The Brooch" 170-1; manuscript 82; 
typescript 82; television play based on, 
48, 155, 162 

"Built a Fence" (unpubl.) 171 

"By the People" 43; typescript 44; incor- 
porated in The Mansion, 43n. 

"Carcassonne" typescript 82 

"Centaur in Brass" 41, 45, 171; incorpo- 
rated in The Town, 45 

"A Courtship" 35; typescript 82, 85 

"Crevasse" see "Victory" 

"A Dangerous Man" (unpubl.) 171 

"Dead Pilots" see "All the Dead Pilots" 

"Death Drag" 25, 171; manuscript 25, 82; 
typescript 82 

"Delta Autumn" typescript 31, 74; incor- 
porated in Go Down, Moses, 31; a part 
incorporated in Big Woods, 39, 80 

"Divorce in Naples" (also entitled "Equi- 
nox") 171; manuscript 82; typescript 
82 

"Doctor Martino" 171-2; manuscript 82; 
typescript 83 

"Drouth" see "Dry September" 

"Dry September" (also entitled 
"Drouth") 172; manuscript 83; type- 
script 83; tearsheets of French trans- 
lation by Maurice E. Coindreau in 
Faulkner collection, 83 

"Dull Tale" (unpubl.) 172 

"Elly" (also entitled "Salvage" or "Sel- 
vage") 172, 175; manuscript 83; type- 
script 83 

"An Empress Passed" see "There Was a 
Queen" 

"Equinox" see "Divorce in Naples" 



"An Error in Chemistry" 33-4; typescript 
77; entered in Ellery Queen's Mystery 
Magazine detective short-story contest 
in 1946, 33-4; first book appearance in 
The Queen's Awards, 1946, 34; tear- 
sheets used for setting copy in Knight's 
Gambit, 77 

"Evangeline" (unpubl.) 172 

"Fire and Clock" (unpubl.) 172 

"The Fire on the Hearth" typescript 73, 
74; relationship to "An Absolution" 
and Go Down, Moses, 74 

"Fool about a Horse" 29, 42; manuscript 
42, 69; reproduction of manuscript, Fig. 
21; typescript 42, 69-70; reproduction 
of typescript, Fig. 20; incorporated in 
The Hamlet 42 

"Fox Hunt" 172; manuscript 83; type- 
script 83 

"Go Down, Moses" typescript 31, 74-5; 
relationship to final chapter of Go 
Down, Moses, 31; Faulkner changes 
name of character from Henry Cold- 
field Sutpen to Samuel Worsham Beau- 
champ in, 61 

"Gold Is Not Always" typescript 73; in- 
corporated in Go Down, Moses, 73 

"Hair" 172-3 

"Hand upon the Waters" typescript 76; 
tearsheets used for setting copy in 
Knight's Gambit, 77 

"Honor" 173; "Point of Honor" a pos- 
sible alternate title, 174 

"The Hound" 29, 41, 173; incorporated 
in The Hamlet, 41 

"Idyll in the Desert" 173, 176, 177, 178, 
179, 180; ex. cat. 21-2; manuscript 22, 
83; no translation of, 125 

"A Justice" 173; manuscript 83; a part 
incorporated in Big Woods, 79 

"Knight's Gambit" (unpubl. short story 
version) 33; typescript 34, 77; relation- 
ship to short novel in Knight's Gambit, 
with change of character's name from 
Charles Weddel to Charles Mallison, 34 

"Landing in Luck" 8 

"The Leg" 170, 173; manuscript 83; type- 
script 83-4 

"Lion" 31; incorporated in Go Down, 
Moses, 31 

"Lizards in Jamshyd's Courtyard" 29, 
173; incorporated in The Hamlet, 41 

"Love" (unpubl.) manuscript 87; type- 
script 87 

"Miss Zilphia Gant" 173-4, 176, 178, 179, 



188 



180; ex. cat. 22; manuscript 22, 84; 
typescript 22, 84; translation 125, 128, 
140; certificate of copyright registra- 
tion, 22, 84; book club edition an- 
nouncement quoted from, 22; Henry 
Nash Smith's letter on publication of, 

'74 

"Mistral" 174; manuscript 84; typescript 
84 

"Monk" tearsheets used for setting copy 
in Knight's Gambit, 77 

"Moonlight" (unpubl.) typescript 87 

"Mountain Victory" 25, 174; manuscript 
84; typescript 84 

"Mule in the Yard" 42, 45; manuscript 
42, 45, 80; manuscript reproduced, Fig. 
23; typescript 80; incorporated in The 
Town, 45 

"My Grandmother Millard" 43; type- 
script 43, 84 

"An Odor of Verbena" see under The 
Unvanquished 

"The Old People" typescript 74; incor- 
porated in Go Down, Moses 74; tear- 
sheets used as setting copy in Big 
Woods, 79 

" 'Once Aboard the Lugger' " 35 

"Pantaloon in Black" typescript 74; in- 
corporated in Go Down, Moses 74 

"Peasants" possible title for "Spotted 
Horses," 168, 174 

'Pennsylvania Station" 175; manuscript 
84; typescript 84-5 

'Per Ardua" (unpubl.) 174 _ 

'Point of Honor" see "Honor" 

'A Point of Law" typescript 73; incor- 
porated in Go Down, Moses 73 

'Red Leaves" 21, 174; manuscript 21, 85; 
typescript 21, 85; a part incorporated 
in Big Woods, 79 

'Race at Morning" galley proofs used for 
setting copy in Big Woods, 80 

'A Rose for Emily" 20-1, 168, 174; manu- 
script 21, 85; typescript 85 

'Rose of Lebanon" (unpubl.) 175; manu- 
script 87 

'Salvage," "Selvage" see "Elly" 

'Shall Not Perish" typescript 34, 35, 82, 
85; Faulkner's television play based on, 
92, 162 

'Shingles for the Lord" typescript 85 

'Skirmish at Sartoris" 27; incorporated 
in The Unvanquished 27 

'Smoke" 33, 168, 175; manuscript 33, 76; 
typescript 33, 77; typescript and tear- 



sheets used for setting copy in Knight's 
Gambit, 77; television play based on, 
162 

"Snow" (unpubl.) typescript 87 

"Spotted Horses" 29, 40-1, 6gn., 170; 
"Peasants" a possible title for, 170, 
174; relationship to "Father Abraham," 
"Abraham's Children," and The Ham- 
let, 41 

"The Tall Men" typescript 86 

"That Evening Sun" 175; reproduction 
of manuscript listed, sgn.; typescript 
85-6 

"There Was a Queen" (also entitled 
"An Empress Passed" and "Thru the 
Window") 25, 42, 175; manuscript 24, 
25, 41-2, 86; typescript 25, 42, 86 

"Thrift" 35, 175; manuscript 35, 86; 
typescript 86 

"Thru the Window" see "There Was a 
Queen" 

"Tomorrow" typescript 76; tearsheets 
used for setting copy in Knight's Gam- 
bit, 77 

"Turnabout" 87, 175; manuscript 86; mo- 
tion picture based on, 47, 48, 155, 156- 
7, 161 

"Two on Bench" 175; manuscript enti- 
tled "Bench for Two," 175; revised as 
"Pennsylvania Station" 175 

"The Unvanquished" story revised for 
chapter entitled "Riposte in Tertio" 
in The Unvanquished, 42 

"Vendue" incorporated in The Unvan- 
quished, 42 

"Victory" manuscript 86; typescript 86; 
story "Crevasse" originally constituted 
part of, 86 

"Was" typescript 30-1, 73, 74; reproduc- 
tion of typescript, Fig. 16; incorporated 
in Go Down, Moses 31, 73 

"Was a Queen" see "There Was a Queen" 

"Wash" incorporated in Absalom, Ab- 
salom! 26 

"The Wishing-Tree" (unpubl.) type- 
script 35, 87; Faulkner inscribes copy 
for Philip Alston Stone, 35 

"With Caution and Dispatch" (unpubl.) 
typescript 35, 87-8; reproduction of 
typescript, Fig. 25 

untitled (unpubl.) typescript 88 

VERSE: 

"Adolescence" (unpubl.) typescript 91 
"L'Apres Midi d'un Faune" 5, 7-8 



189 



"April" typescript 88 

"Cathay" 8; typescript 8, 88; typescript 
reproduced, Fig. 25 

"A Child Looks from His Window" type- 
script 89 

"Clair de Lune" 8 

"Cleopatra" (A Green Bough, XXXVII) 
typescript 91 

"The Dancer" (unpubl.) typescript 91 

"Eunice" (unpubl.) typescript 91 

"The Flowers That Died" typescript 91 

"I Will Not Weep for Youth" typescript 
88 

"Knew I Love Once" (A Green Bough, 
XXXIII) typescript 88 

"La Lune ne Grade Aucune Rancune" 
(A Green Bough, XXXII) typescript 
24, 90; typescript reproduced, Fig. 4 

"Man Comes, Man Goes" (A Green 
Bough, VI) typescript 89-90 

"Marriage" (A Green Bough, II) type- 
script 89 

"My Epitaph" (A Green Bough, XLIV; 
also publ. as "This Earth") typescript 
24, 88 

"Nativity" (A Green Bough, XXXIV) 
typescript 91 

"Night Piece" (A Green Bough, VII) 
typescript 90 

"Nocturne" 8, 9; reproduced, Fig. 2 

"On Seeing the Winged Victory for the 
First Time" (A Green Bough, XVII) 
typescript go 

"Philosophy" (A Green Bough, V) type- 
script 89 

"Portrait" 10 

"Puck and Death" (A Green Bough, 
XVI) typescript 90 

"The Shepherd's Love" (unpubl.) type- 
script 91 

"Spring" (A Green Bough, XXXVI) type- 
script 24, 88 

"Study" 10 

"This Earth" see "My Epitaph" 

"To a Co-ed" quoted 9 

"To Elise" (unpubl.) typescript 91 

"To a Virgin" (A Green Bough, XXXIX) 
typescript 89 

"Twilight" (A Green Bough, X) type- 
script 8g 

"Vision in Spring" typescript 89 

"Winter Is Gone" typescript 89 

four untitled poems (A Green Bough, 
IX, XI, XII, XIII) typescripts 90 



three untitled poems (unpubl.) type- 
scripts 92 

ARTICLES: 

"A Letter to the North" 53; typescript, 
entitled "Letter to a Northern Editor," 

53 

"Mississippi" 43; typescript 43, 92; a 
part incorporated in Big Woods, 79 

"On Fear: The South in Labor" 53; type- 
script, 53; Faulkner reads at Nagano, 

53 

"On Privacy: The American Dream: 
What Happened to It" 50, 53; type- 
script of speech version, entitled "Free- 
dom American Style," 50 

"Sherwood Anderson" 11, 12, 14, 15 

SPEECHES: 

Athens Academy, acceptance of Silver 
Medal of, 51; text quoted, 51 

to Delta Council, 50 

"Freedom American Style" (delivered at 
the University of Oregon), 50-1; type- 
scripts 50-1; publ. as article, entitled 
"On Privacy," see articles 

Legion of Honor acceptance, 49-50; re- 
production of manuscript listed, 4gn. 

National Book Award acceptance, 50; 
typescript 50 

Nobel Prize acceptance, 4g; text of scroll 
translated, 49 

Pine Manor Junior College commence- 
ment, 50 

to Southern Historical Association, 51; 
typescript 51 

University High School commencement, 
4g; manuscript g3 

LETTERS: 

To Anderson, Sherwood, on Al Jackson 
legend, 12; letter reproduced, Figs. 27- 

9 

To the Chamber of Commerce of Bates- 
ville, Miss., 52 

To Coindreau, Maurice E., on transla- 
tion of As I Lay Dying, 18 

To Coindreau, Maurice E., on transla- 
tion of "A Rose for Emily," 2 in. 

To the Editor of The New York Times, 
52 



190 



To the Editor of The Oxford Eagle, 52 

To Green, Raymond, on authorship of 
manuscript play "Marionettes," quot- 
ed, 9 

To the Secretary of the American Acad- 
emy of Arts and Letters, on accept- 
ance of Howells Medal, 52 

To Thompson, Mr., on character Suratt 
in Sartoris and "Spotted Horses," quot- 
ed, 41 

To Walser, Richard, on Thomas Wolfe, 

52 
To Wasson, Ben, on The Sound and the 

Fury, 17 
"A Letter to the North," "Letter to a 

Northern Editor" see articles 

MISCELLANEOUS: 

"beer broadside" 53 

contributions to The Mississippian (col- 
lege weekly) 5, 7, 8 

contributions to Ole Miss (college an- 
nual) 7, 9 

drawings 7, 9 

Faulkner issue of Contempo 24 

interview in The Paris Review 5, 6, 14, 

15. }7> 47 

interview in The New York Times 39 

Introduction to Sherwood Anderson ir 
Other Famous Creoles, by William 
Spratling 1 1 

sending schedule of short stories 35, 167- 
80 

sketches in the New Orleans Times- 
Picayune 5, 10, ii, 12-13, 46, 115-6; 
"The Cobbler" 13; "Country Mice" 
13; "Episode" 46; "Jealousy" 46; "The 
Kid Learns" 88; "The Liar" 13, 14; 
"Mirrors of Chartres Street" 12, 13; 
"Out of Nazareth" 13; "Yo Ho and 
Two Bottles of Rum" 12-13 

To the Youth of Japan (pamphlet) 52 

MOTION PICTURE WRITING BY 
FAULKNER: 

The Adventures of Don Juan 159 
"The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse" (unpro- 
duced; also entitled "Fog over Lon- 
don") 160 
Background to Danger 159 
Banjo on My Knee 158 
"Battle Cry" (unproduced) 160 



The Big Sleep 47, 157; manuscript 92; 
script 48 

"Bride of the Bayou" (unproduced) 161 

"Continuous Performance" (unproduced) 
typescript 92 

"Country Lawyer" (unproduced) 160 

Deep Valley 159 

"The De Gaulle Story" (unproduced) 160 

Drums along the Mohawk 158-9 

"Faulkner Story #2" (unproduced; un- 
official title) 160 

"Flying the Mail" (unproduced) 160 

"Fog over London" (unproduced) see 
"The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse" 

Four Men and a Prayer 158 

"The Giant Swing" (unproduced) 160 

God Is My Copilot 159 

Gunga Din 158 

"Honor" (unproduced) 160 

Land of the Pharaohs 47, 157 

"Latin American Kingdom" (unpro- 
duced) 160 

Lazy River 158 

The Left Hand of God 159; Faulkner's 
unproduced screen play for, I5gn. 

"The Life and Death of a Bomber" (un- 
produced) 160 

"Man Servant" (unproduced) 160 

Mildred Pierce 159 

"One Way to Catch a Horse" (unpro- 
duced) typescript 92 

"Petrified Forest" (unproduced) 161 

"Revolt in the Earth" (unproduced) 160; 
typescript 92 

Road to Glory 47, 157 

Slave Ship 47, 48, 157 

The Southerner 47, 159 

Stallion Road 159 

Submarine Patrol 158 

Sutter's Gold 159 

To Have and Have Not 47, 157 

Today We Live 47, 156-7 

"Turn to the Right" (unproduced) 160 

"War Birds" (unproduced) 160 

two untitled typescripts 93 

MOTION PICTURES ADAPTED 
FROM FAULKNER'S WRITINGS: 

"Honor" (unproduced) 160 
Intruder in the Dust 48, 161 
The Long Hot Summer 161 
"Revolt in the Earth" (unproduced) 60; 
typescript g2 



191 



The Sound and the Fury 161-2 
The Story of Temple Drake 48, 161 
The Tarnished Angels 161 
Today We Live 47, 156-7 
"War Birds" (unproduced) 160 

TELEVISION PLAY WRITING BY 
FAULKNER: 

The Brooch 48, 162 

The Graduation Dress 162 

"Old Man" (unproduced) typescript 

treatment, 92; letter by Saxe Commins 

on, 92 
Shall Not Perish 162; typescript 92 



TELEVISION PLAYS ADAPTED 
FROM FAULKNER'S WRITINGS: 

Ad Astra 163 
As I Lay Dying 163 
Barn Burning 48, 162-3 
The Brooch 48, 162 
An Error in Chemistry 163 
The Old Man 163; see also 92 for Faulk- 
ner's treatment 
Shall Not Perish 162; typescript 92 
Smoke 48, 162 

The Sound and the Fury 48, 163 
The Tall Men 163 
Tomorrow 163 
Wild Stallion 163 



192 



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